Impact of Microirrigation on Florida Horticulture

in HortTechnology
Authors:
G. J. HochmuthHorticultural Sciences Department, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0690.

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S. J. LocascioHorticultural Sciences Department, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0690.

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T.E. CrockerHorticultural Sciences Department, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0690.

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C.D. StanleyGu1f Coast Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, Bradenton, FL 34203-9324.

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G.A. ClarkGu1f Coast Research and Education Center, IFAS, University of Florida, Bradenton, FL 34203-9324.

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L.R ParsonsCitrus Research and Education Center, IFAS, Lake Alfred, FL 33850-2299.

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The Florida horticulture industry (vegetables, ornamentals, citrus, and deciduous fruit), valued at $4.5 billion, has widely adopted microirrigation techniques to use water and fertilizer more efficiently. A broad array of microirrigation systems is available, and benefits of microirrigation go beyond water conservation. The potential for more-efficient agricultural chemical (pesticides and fertilizer) application is especially important in today's environmentally conscious society. Microirrigation is a tool providing growers with the power to better manage costly inputs, minimize environmental impact, and still produce high-quality products at a profit.

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