Solid Matrix Priming Hastens Canterbury Bells Seed Germination

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  • 1 Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078-6027.
  • | 2 Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078-6027.
  • | 3 Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078.
  • | 4 Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078-6027. Present address: Department of Horticultural Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7609.

Canterbury bells (Campanula medium `Champion Blue') seeds were primed using calcined clay at 68 °F (20 °C) for 1, 3, or 5 days at water potentials (Ψ) of -25, -20, -18, or -16 bars (-2.5, -2.0, -1.8, or -1.6 MPa). Germination was fastest (3.0 to 3.1 days) after priming with a Ψ of -18 or -16 bars for 5 days. Seeds primed for 3 or 5 days with moisture present germinated faster than nonprimed seeds, but time to 50% germination (T50) was longer when seeds were primed for 1 day regardless of Ψ compared to nonprimed seed. Germination uniformity decreased (time from 10% to 90% germination, T10-90, increased) as Ψ increased. Although a curvilinear relationship existed between T10-90 and priming duration, T10-90 did not differ between nonprimed seeds and seeds in any priming treatment except those primed for 3 days with 20% moisture (-16 bars). Priming did not affect total germination percentage (97%).

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