Effects of Core Cultivation Tine Entry Angle on Golf Putting Greens

in HortTechnology

Hollow tine cultivation is a routine practice on golf course putting greens, where the tine entry angle normally is 90°. Effects of various tine entry angles impacting putting green surfaces have not been investigated. The hypothesis was that different tine entry angles during cultivation would impact a greater area of the soil profile by enhancing water infiltration rates, reducing localized dry spots, and enhancing turf quality. Therefore, a 2-year field study in 2003 and 2004 was conducted to determine the impact of core cultivation tine entry angle on `Crenshaw' creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stoloniferous var. palustris). Treatments included three angles of hollow tine entry at 50°, 70°, and 90° and an untreated plot without cultivation. Manual cultivators consisted of four 1/4-inch- and 1/2-inch-diameter hollow tines 3 inches in length, spaced 2 inches apart. Treatment applications were in April, May, September, and October. Measurements included visual turfgrass quality (TQ), molarity ethanol droplet test (MED), and water infiltration. No treatment (control, 50°, 70°, 90°) effects in years I and II for TQ were noted. MED scores in May were 23% higher than in August and September. Tines of 1/2-inch diameter reduced soil hydrophobicity (MED) 6% compared to tines of 1/4-inch-diameter tines. Tines of 50°, 70°, and 90° had 129%, 163%, and 211% greater water infiltration than the untreated, respectively.

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Corresponding author: haibol@clemson.edu

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