Register of Magnolia Cultivars

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Register of Magnolia Cultivars

This document serves as a register of Magnolia cultivars known to have been historically selected and/or introduced into horticulture. The purpose of this register is, first and foremost, to provide clarification on what Magnolia Society International (MSI), in their capacity as International Cultivar Registration Authority (ICRA) for Magnoliaceae, views to be the currently accepted name for each cultivar in accordance with the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP). Accepted cultivar epithets typically need to be published in printed media or similarly duplicated material, include a description as to their distinct characteristics, and represent the earliest published epithet applied to the cultivar. Cultivar epithets may also be rejected for reasons including use of prohibited words and symbols, use against the wishes of the introducer, and/or use as a trademarked or otherwise controlled trade designation not available for unrestricted public use. Please reference the ICNCP for additional information. In many cases, I have included reference to the relevant articles of the ICNCP (9th Ed., June 2016) leading me to accept or reject a particular cultivar epithet.

Each cultivar epithet is associated with a reference in which the cultivar was listed or described. Whenever possible, the earliest such reference is listed. Though this paper is primarily intended for use as a bibliographic reference as opposed to a horticultural monograph, when available, descriptions as to the pedigree and morphology of plants are provided, with additional information including hardiness, flowering time, fragrance, names of hybridizers and introducers, and years of introduction.

Taxonomy used in this register is per Magnolia Society International. The primary differences from other commonly accepted treatments (Meyer, 1997; Nianhe et al., 2008) are acceptance of the varieties Magnolia sprengeri var. diva and Magnolia virginiana var. australis (Kang and Ejder, 2011; Azuma et al., 2011), and acceptance of Magnolia fraseri var. pyramidata and Magnolia macrophylla var. ashei as lower taxa instead of species (Dick Figlar, pers. comm).

Magnolia Society International has been recording information on cultivars since its founding in the 1960s. The first edition of the register (checklist) was prepared by John M. Fogg Jr. and Joseph C. McDaniel, seeing publication through the American Horticultural Society Plant Sciences Data Center in 1975. An update was completed in 1994 by Larry Langford, then Editor for Magnolia Society International. In 2000, the register was digitized and uploaded to the webpage for Magnolia Society International, where it continued to see semi-regular updates until 2004. Beginning in 2008, Tim Boland, then Registrar for the Magnolia Society, initiated an effort to update the register, design an online cultivar registration form, and align both with the redesign of the Magnolia Society International website led by Dove Coggeshall. Over the next few years, current literature was reviewed with the bulk of the research and consolidation completed by Susan Mintun, volunteer at the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College and member of Magnolia Society International’s Board of Directors from 2015 to 2017.

I began working towards an update in 2018 by consolidating all previous cultivar research into BRAHMS (Botanical Research and Herbarium Management System) a proprietary database developed by University of Oxford. I then spent the next two years researching additional names, making determinations as to accepted and rejected cultivar epithets and preparing a final written report. This register represents the culmination of those efforts.

I would like to conclude this introduction with a plea for registration. Only a small fraction of the new cultivars added to this register since 1994 underwent a formal registration process through Magnolia Society International. Much of the confusion present in cultivated Magnolia nomenclature results from cultivars appearing solely in largely ephemeral media including listings in sparsely or regionally distributed nursery catalogs, web catalogs, or other temporary internet references. Registration with Magnolia Society International helps to ensure that the cultivar epithet chosen for the selection is available, acceptable, and results in publication in a current issue of Magnolia: The Journal of Magnolia Society International. There is no charge associated with this process. Please visit the MSI website, http://www.magnoliasociety.org, for more information.

Alphabetical Listing of Magnolia Cultivars

Accepted cultivar epithets are indicated in bold type

‘14-Karat’

Fairweather Gardens nursery catalog, p. 46, Spring 1999

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii). Gresham hybrid selected and distributed by John Giordano (JG#14). Thick, porcelain-white flowers, mid-season.

‘18-60’

Fairweather Gardens nursery catalog, p. 63, Fall 1999

See ‘Sunsation’.

‘24 Below’

Magnolia 27(1) [Issue 51]: 26, 1991

M. grandiflora. Frank Galyon, Knoxville, TN, 1985. Cold-hardy selection named for surviving a minimum temperature of -24°F. The actual minimum temperature, however, has been disputed. It was based on a reading from the Knoxville Airport Weather Station and may not account for the distance to, or microclimates present on, Dr. Galyon’s property.

‘A.E. Bold’

lunaplant.de website. http://www.lunaplant.de/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘J. C. Williams’ × ‘JURmag1’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Narrow, upright habit. Flowers large, cup-shaped, bright pink.

‘A.G.Hybrid’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

Temporary name for the selection later named ‘J. C. Williams’. See ‘J. C. Williams’

‘Áashild Kalleberg’

Magnolia 31(1) [Issue 59]: 17, 1996

M. ×wieseneri. Olav Kalleberg, Norway. Raised from seed from Gothenburg Botanical Garden. Flowers pure white, with deep-red stamens like some forms of M. sieboldii, foliage like M. obovata. Vigorous, single-stemmed, with a very symmetrical branching pattern.

‘Acuminata’

Page’s Prodromus, p. 37, 1817, Southampton, England

M. grandiflora. Introduced 1817 by Southampton Botanic Garden, Southampton, England. Leaves with long, pointed apex.

‘Adral’

R. H. Smith, Morris Arb. Bull. 15: 64, 1964

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers purple-red, 9 tepals, 13 × 5 cm. Late-season.

‘Advance’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 13-14, 2005

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Burgundy’ × ‘Vulcan’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Flowers lilac-purple with nine, light pink inner tepals ca 10 × 9 cm.

‘After Elizabeth’

Magnolia 46(2) [Issue 90]: 58-61, 2011

M. ×soulangeana. Tom Krenitsky, Chapel Hill, NC. Flowers with reddish purple base grading to cream apex, appearing after ‘Elizabeth’ has finished flowering. Uncertain parentage, theorized as backcross of M. ×soulangeana to M. liliiflora parent due to late flowering time.

‘Agate’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 67]: 1-13, 2000

M. delavayi. Kunming Botanic Gardens ca 2000. 9-12 tepals, outer 1-2 pinkish white with green stripes, inner tepals pale pink.

‘Aia’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. salicifolia. Selected by Jose Almandoz, Aia, Spain. Seedling of ‘W.B. Clarke’. Pyramidal habit. Description on Eisenhut website mentions sepaloid stamens as distinct, but there is no picture or detail as to characteristic. Photos present on magnoliastore.com depict a white flower with ca 14-16 tepals and stamens as expected for M. salicifolia selections.

‘Aiken County’

Hogan, Trees for all Seasons, p. 201, 2008

M. virginiana var. australis. Selected and introduced by Chuck Weeks, Nurseries Caroliniana, North Augusta, SC. Leaves exceptionally large and glossy, appearing waxed.

‘Al’s Dwarf’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 688, 2009

M. liliiflora. Selected by Albert Durio, Louisiana Nurseries, LA. Dwarf, dense habit.

‘Al’s Golden’

Louisiana Nurseries catalog, p. 88, 1994-1996

M. grandiflora. Golden-variegated foliage.

‘Alabama Everblooming’

Proc. 6th Central States Forest Tree Improv. Conf., p. 7, October 1968

M. grandiflora. J. C. McDaniel. Vigorous. Leaves lanceolate. Long flowering season, extending into September in Cullman, AL. Very fragrant.

‘Alba Borde Hill’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. campbellii. A George Forrest collection. Flowers pure white, cup and saucer shaped. Listed on Eisenhut website as subsp. mollicomata, now generally regarded as a synonym of M. campbellii.

‘Alba Spectabilis’

van Houtte, cat. #163: 45. 1875, Ghent, Belgium

See M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba’.

‘Alba Superba’

van Geert, Extr. Gen. Cat. pl. p. 22. 1866, Ghent, Belgium

See M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba’.

‘Alba’

Roy. Hort. Soc., Camellias and Magnolias, Conference Report, p. 106, 1950

M. campbellii. White flowers.

‘Alba’

(Louis Van Houtte, about 1867), See Wister, Swarthmore Plant Notes, ed. 3, 1 (1): 86 (1955-56)

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers primarily white, but outside of petals faintly tinged light purplish rose, darker in veins. Color extends less than halfway up tepal. Inside a little purple at base, not on tepal. 9 tepals, each ca 7.5 × 3 cm.= M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba Spectabilis’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba Superba’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘White Saucer’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘White’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Conspicua Alba’.

‘Alba’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 84: 422. 1959

M. ×veitchii. In reference to an almost pure white-flowered specimen ca 30 years of age (in 1959) growing near the Azalea Garden of Cambridge Cottage Garden, Kew labeled as “Magnolia ×veitchii f. alba”. Presented as forma and not a cultivar. Compare ‘Isca’, potentially synonymous.

‘Albatross’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 41: 61. 1988

(M. cylindrica × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). A chance seedling selected and raised at Trewithen, Truro, United Kingdom. Profuse flowering. Flowers white, flushed with green towards base, to 23-30 cm. Stamens with crimson anthers and pink filaments.

‘Alex’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Maurice Foster, Kent, England. Upright, pink flowered selection. =M. ‘Columnar Pink’.

‘Alexander’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, p. 377. 1942

M. ×soulangeana. In Standardized Plant Names (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexandrina’.

‘Alexander Alba’

Overlook Nurseries, catalog 1954-55, Mobile, Alabama

See M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexandrina Alba’.

‘Alexandrina’

Wister, Swarthmore Plant Notes, Ed, 3, 1 (1): 87, 1955-56

M. ×soulangeana. Introduced by Cels of Paris, France in 1831. Leaves and flowers larger than type. Flowers outside purplish magenta, darkest at base, inside normally white, 9 tepals, appearing two weeks later than M. ×soulangeana. At least two forms utilizing this name, one with a lighter flower color and more upright habit more common in the United States, and one with a darker flower color more common in Europe. Gardiner (2000) also discusses a third form with an erect habit and pure white flowers, potentially the cultivar recognized here as ‘Alexandrina Alba’. Other forms may exist, and other cultivars have sometimes been distributed with tentative names referencing ‘Alexandrina’ (See ‘Alexandrina Japanese Form’ [‘Big Pink’]). A cultivar group should not be established for these plants as they do not share common characteristics. An examination of material currently cultivated as ‘Alexandrina’ should be completed to properly analyze the diversity within, with new cultivar epithets proposed if necessary. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexander’.

‘Alexandrina Alba’

Millais, Magnolias, p. 82, 1927

M. ×soulangeana. Compare ‘Alexandrina’ but with larger, white flowers appearing one week later. As M. alexandrina var. alba. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexander Alba’.

‘Alexandrina Japanese Form’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 54:13, 2003

M. ×soulangeana See ‘Big Pink’.

‘Alexandrina Variegata’

Schelle in Beissner et al., Handbuch der Laubholz-Benennung p. 100, 1903

M. ×soulangeana. Leaves with cream-colored variegation. In culture in the Netherlands as early as 1893.

‘Alexeed’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 700, 2009

M. stellata. See ‘Alixeed’.

‘Alexis Lizinker’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 27, 1998

M. grandiflora. James Phillips, Elmwood, MA from a tree occurring near Troy, AL in 1969. Flowers ca 13 cm diameter, appearing June through July.

‘Alixeed’

Fairweather Gardens nursery catalog, p. 50, Spring 1999

M. stellata. Light pink flowers, very fragrant. Tepals held upright as opposed to flopping. Chance seedling from the garden of William Brincka, IN. = M. stellata ‘Alexeed’

‘Alba Trewithen’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. campbellii. White flowers. Distinct from either M. campbellii Trewithen type described by Johnstone (1955), but characteristics uncertain.

‘Allison’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 9(2): 12. 1973

M. acuminata. Selected by J. C. McDaniel from a large old tree in Tolono, IL. Branches more spreading and fall color superior to typical.

‘Allspice’

Rhod. with Cam & Mag 43: 25, 1991

M. ×foggii. Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers large, white, and fragrant.

‘Alnarp’

Magnolia 47(1) [Issue 91]: 41-49, 2012

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × Open-pollinated seedling of M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Selected by Karl Flinck, Bjuv, Sweden, from seed provided by Phil Savage. Large tree to at least 13 m. Flower color a blend of pink and yellow. Compare ‘Evamaria’ but with more pink to the inner tepals. 8-9 tepals, all petaloid and 12 cm in length.

‘Alysha’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(‘J. C. Williams’ × ‘Vulcan’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers red-purple. Pollen parent may instead be ‘Apollo’.

‘Amabilis’

Baumann, catalogue, 1865, Bollwiller, France

M. ×soulangeana. Broad, slow growing. Flowers similar to M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba’, but broader. Darker than ‘Brozzonii’. Tepals ca 9 × 7 cm. As M. denudata var. amabilis in Pampanini, Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 199. 1915. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Amabilis-Alba’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Amblis’

‘Amabilis-Alba’

Gossler, Plant List, 1971, Springfield, Oregon

M. ×soulangeana. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Amabilis’.

‘Amber’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

M. ×brooklynensis (M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × M. ×brooklynensis). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers large with color comparable to ‘Evamaria’.

‘Amblis’

W. B. Clarke & Co., list 5859, p. 50. 1958, San Jose, California

M. ×soulangeana. Misspelling of ‘Amabilis’. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Amabilis’.

‘Ambrose Congreve’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook, p. 7-28, 2005

M. campbellii. Flowers claret-red. Selected from a group of trees growing in Mount Congreve, Waterford, southern Ireland.

‘Ambrosia’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 14-15, 2005

M. ×brooklynensis (M. ×brooklynensis ‘Evamaria’ × unnamed M. ×brooklynensis selection [#143]). Selected by David Clulow, 1998. Pyramidal habit to ca 10 m height. Flowers multi-colored, appearing slightly ahead of or with leaves. 6 tepals, ca 11 × 6 cm, yellow, shaded with chartreuse green and purple striping and stippling in the center.

‘Amethyst Flame’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 61: 20, 2010

(M. liliiflora × ‘Vulcan’). Vance Hooper, named ca 1995. Compact, upright. Flowers purple-pink.

‘André Leroy’

Arnoldia 20: 22, 1960

M. ×soulangeana. Cultivated by Barbier & Co. ca 1900 in Orleans, France. Rough, sprawling habit. Flowers rose-purple, slightly redder and later than the type. Compare ‘Verbanica’ but flowers less tubular. Named for a renowned nurseryman in Angers, France. Listed as ‘Andre Leroy’ (without accent) in Arnoldia article, possibly due to limitations of printer.

‘Angel Mist’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 63: 23, 2012

(M. officinalis × M. ×wieseneri). August Kehr hybrid introduced by Dennis Ledvina. Flowers creamy white, 12 tepals. Fragrant. Moderate seed fertility.

‘Angelica’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

(‘Pegasus’ × M. denudata ‘Sawada’s Pink’). Phil Savage hybrid selected by William Seidl. Flowers pure white, bowl-shaped, ca 15-17 cm. Good seed fertility.

‘Angels Landing’

lunaplant.de website. http://www.lunaplant.de/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘Pickard’s Opal’ × M. sprengeri var. sprengeri). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Dense, fast growing. Flowers white to 22 cm diameter. Inner tepals deep pink at base.

‘Anglorum’

Leroy, Rev. Hort. 37: 308, 1866

M. grandiflora. Selected by Mr. Bodin of the Isle of Jersey. Flowers dull white, to 30 cm diameter, tepals very thick and fleshy. Flowering all summer. Maybe = ‘Macrantha Anglorum’. Listed flower diameter is towards the larger end of the spectrum for the species, but not remarkably large.

‘Angustifolia’

Cels, cat. Arb. p. 230 1817, Paris, France

M. grandiflora. Leaves narrow, flowers typical. = M. grandiflora ‘Augustifolia’; = M. grandiflora ‘Hartwicus’; = M. grandiflora ‘Salicifolia Hartwegii’; = M. grandiflora ‘Salicifolia’

‘Angustifolia’

Page’s Prodr. p. 21. 1817, Southampton, England (as M. glauca var. angustifolia)

M. virginiana var. australis. Leaves narrow, willow-like. = M. virginiana var. australis ‘Salicifolia’

‘Angustifolia Glabrata’

Schelle in Beissner et al., Handb. Der Laubholz-Benennung 100, 1903

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. Presumably a narrow-leaved, glabrous selection. Perhaps the unnamed form referenced by Millias (1927) as bearing “a close resemblance to var. lanceolata but [with] a glabrous pale green underside to the leaf … never flowers or at least hardly ever … often sent out by nurserymen as var. exoniensis”.

‘Anilou’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 20-21, 2005

(M. acuminata × ‘Elizabeth’). August Kehr hybrid selected by Koen Camelbeke and Philippe de Spoelberch, Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. Upright habit. Flowers erect. Young flowers very green, maturing to deep yellow. Outer whorl of tepals retains green blotch. Tepals broadly obovate, ca 11 cm × 6 cm. Flowering with leaves and persisting for over a month.

‘Anita Figlar’

Magnolia 51(1) [Issue 99]: 24-25, 2016

M. insignis. Richard Figlar, Pickens, SC. More floriferous than the species, with the middle tier of tepals deep red. Habit pyramidal when young, spreading and irregular at maturity.

‘Ann’

Morris Arb. Bull. 19: 28, 1968

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. stellata ‘Rosea’). U.S. National Arboretum. Flowers red-purple, erect. 6-8 tepals ca 3.5 × 1.5 cm. Named for Ann de Vos.

‘Ann Jenkins’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook, p. 7-28, 2005

M. campbellii Raffillii Group. Originating circa 1951. Flowers dark purple.

‘Ann’s Delight’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56: 21. 2005

Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers similar to M. ‘Vulcan’, superior per Heerdegen and Eisenhut (2019).

‘Anna’

RareFind Nursery website, http://www.rarefindnursery.com, Accessed 25 Jan 2019

([M. acuminata × M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’] × [M. acuminata × M. sargentiana]). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected in Sweden by Sven Lennartsson. Flowers creamy-white, with some yellow/pink coloration at the base. Semi-double, 10-16 thick tepals.

‘Anne Leitner’

Magnolia 53:2 [Issue 104]: 8, 2018

(‘JURmag1’ × ‘J. C. Williams’). Hybridized by Michael Gottschalk, Germany, selected and introduced by Arboretum Wespelaar, Haacht, Belgium ca 2014. Large flowers to 25 cm diameter, purple both inside and out with 12 tepals. Flowering mid-March to early April (Belgium).

‘Anne Pickard’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 100, 1994

M. grandiflora. Amos Pickard, Magnolia Gardens, Canterbury, Kent, England ca 1968. Flowers creamy white, 22-25 tepals. Leaves variegated. Apparently, a sport or chance seedling from M. ‘Saint George’.

‘Anne Rosse’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 15, 1984

(M. denudata × M. sargentiana). Flowers white with a pink flush, deepening to red at the base, chalice shaped, ca 18-20 cm diameter. 9 tepals. Sometimes listed as ‘Ann Rosse’, an incorrect spelling.

‘Anticipation’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 15, 2000

M. cylindrica (Open-pollinated seedling of M. cylindrica). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, 1990. Flowers white, early season, to 25 cm diameter. Flowers and habit comparable to ‘Albatross’. Potentially some distribution as “R3-18” (Row 3, Plant 18) prior to registration.

‘Antje Zandee’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘JURmag1’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Deep Purple Dream’). Flowers dark purple-pink, globe-shaped.

‘Anya’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 13 July 2018.

Originated in Lawrence, New Zealand. Flowers are in the shape of M. sprengeri var. diva but a deeper red in color. Piet Vergeldt Nursery listing mentions parentage of M. ‘Vulcan’ but uncertain as to specific pedigree.

‘Apalachee’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. virginiana var. australis. Tom Dodd III, Semmes, AL. Upright habit. Leaves tiny, less than 5 cm length. Twigs pubescent. One of five small leaved selections by Tom Dodd III (See also: ‘Tensaw’, ‘Cahaba’, ‘Coosa’, and ‘Perdido’). Uncertain as to distinctions between selections. Listed as ‘Appalachi’, though “Apalachee” is the name of the tributary and was likely intended.

‘Aphrodite’

lunaplant.de website. http://www.lunaplant.de/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘JURmag1’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Deep Purple Dream’). Vigorous, expected mature height of 4-5 m. Flowers magenta-purple, globe shaped, wide tepals.

‘Apollo’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 44: 52, 1992

(Unnamed seedling [supposed M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ hybrid] × M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’). Felix Jury, New Zealand. Sister seedling of ‘Iolanthe’. Floriferous. Early season flowers deep violet with paler inner tepals; later flowers deep rose pink, to 25 cm diameter. Fruity fragrance.

‘Apricot Brandy’

Fairweather Gardens nursery catalog, Spring 2013

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Outer tepals apricot-yellow, inner tepals pale pink.

‘Apricot Lady’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Koban Dori’ × ‘Pink Surprise’). Introduced by Erland Ejder and Swedish Magnolia Group from the K. E. Flinck Magnolia Forest, Alnarp, Sweden. Flowers yellow, grading to pink towards the base, appearing apricot-colored from a distance. Mid-spring, usually after frosts. No seed set observed, likely aneuploid.

‘April Melody’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘Atlas’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Ruby’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Compact, upright habit. Thick cup-shaped flowers with pink-red stripe to the center of the tepal.

‘Arabian Nights’

Magnolia Grove website. http://www.magnoliagrove.co.nz/index.php/nz-raised-magnolia-collection. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(‘Sayonara’ × ‘Vulcan’). Stuart Robertson, Auckland Botanic Gardens ca 2000, named ca 2007. Flowers red/purple. Floriferous, vigorous selection.

‘Arborea’

Mouillefert, Traite 120, 1891

M. liliiflora. Leaves slightly smaller than the type, reddish in color, and very pubescent. Second year twigs red-brown. More robust than the type. Historically in cultivation at Trianon near Paris, France.

‘Arborea’

Wada, Jap. Gard. Treas., p. 36, Hakoneya Nurseries, Numazu-Shi, Japan

M. stellata. Described as “a hybrid with M. kobus”. Does not appear to be a distinct cultivar. Likely = M. ×loebneri, potentially = M. kobus var. borealis.

‘Arborea’

Loddiges, catalogue, Ed. 11, p. 29, Appended to his Bot. Cab. 1, 1818

M. virginiana var. australis. Nomen nudum. Probably not all that distinct from the type.

‘Arborescens’

Langford, Check List of the Cultivated Magnolias, p. 38, 1994

M. kobus. Cultivated in 1961 by D. Todd Gresham, Santa Cruz, CA and David G. Leach, Brookville, PA. This probably = M. kobus var. borealis, which is arborescent, but not currently recognized as a distinct lower taxon of M. kobus.

‘Archalie’

Louisiana Nurseries catalog, p. 7, 1990-1992

M. ×soulangeana (M. denudata × M. ×soulangeana ‘Grace McDade’). Archalie Harman, before 1978. White flowers with faint pink tepal base. Flowers comparable to ‘Lennei Alba’, but larger and thicker. Likely a very limited release by Louisiana Nurseries.

‘Archangel’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Brozzonii’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Large white cup-shaped flowers flushed red-purple at the base. Large individual tepals. Some fragrance, quite precocious. = M. ‘Aristocrat’

‘Arctic Star’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery catalog, p. 56, 2015

(possibly M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Toro’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Unusual flower color, cream with red/lavender streaks and green tints.

‘Argentea’

Pursh ex de Candolle, Reg. Veg. Syst. 1: 452, 1817

M. virginiana. Leaves oblong, glaucous white silky hairy beneath. Probably = var. australis.

‘Aristocrat’

Unpublished, unregistered. Pleasant Run Nursery was selling under this name, though ‘Aristocrat’ is probably ‘Archangel’ per Roy Klehm and Dennis Ledvina. See ‘Archangel’.

‘Arnold Arboretum Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 2, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Likely seedlings from the two renowned specimens outside the Hunnewell building at the Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, MA. No description. Not established (Art 27.1).

‘Arnold Dance’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 51: 22, 2000

(M. sargentiana × M. campbellii). Selected by Burncoose Nursery, Cornwall, England. Flowers large, pink, textured.

‘Asian Artistry’

RareFind Nursery catalog, p. 49, 2003

(M. denudata × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Todd Gresham, Santa Cruz, CA, USA. Flowers upright, pink, late-season.

‘Asoniensis’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 78, 1916

M. grandiflora. See ‘Exmouth’.

‘Athene’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 44: 52, 1992

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × ‘Mark Jury’). Felix Jury, New Zealand. 6-8 m height. Cup-and-saucer type flowers, ivory white with violet pink base, to 20-25 cm diameter.

‘Atlas’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 44: 52, 1992

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × ‘Mark Jury’). Flowers lilac-pink, similar in size and shape to ‘Iolanthe’.

‘Atropurpurea’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort, 41: 138, 1916

M. liliiflora. Probably = M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’.

‘Augustifolia’

Millais, Magnolias, p. 83, 1927

M. grandiflora. Spelling error, see M. grandiflora ‘Angustifolia’.

‘Aurea’

Nicholson, The Garden 24: 512, 1883

M. acuminata. Leaves golden, streaked green. = M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Variegata’

‘Aurea’

Hardin, Jour. Elisha Mitchell Soc. 70 (2): 306, 1954

M. acuminata. Basionym: Tulipastrum acuminatum aureum (Ashe, Bull. Charleston Mus. 13: 289. 1917). M. acuminata ‘Aurea’ as described by Nicholson has priority, preventing the epithet from being established for this selection (Art 30.1).

‘Aureovariegata’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 13 July 2018

M. champaca. Variable yellow-mottled variegation. Not established. Cultivar epithets may not be comprised solely in Latin after 1958 (Art 21.11).

‘Aurora’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 49, 2011

(‘Star Wars’ × M. sargentiana). Hybridized by Os Blumhardt, New Zealand. Upright, columnar habit. Flowers pink, flowering reliably.

‘Autumn Queen’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 27-29, 2005

M. virginiana var. australis. Selected by Os Blumhardt, New Zealand. Per Church (2005), flowers throughout the year in New Zealand. Photos in article depict arborescent habit indicating similarity to var. australis.

‘Avalon’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, accessed 2019 December 10

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Ruby’ × M. campbellii ‘Werrington’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Wide, upright tree. Flowers bright pink with dark stripe to center of tepal.

‘Avocet’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag 58: 19, 2007

(M. ×veitchii ‘Isca’ × M. soulangeana). Tim Thornton, England, 2003 (Hybrid No. 91). Large flowers, nearly pure white.

‘Baby Doll’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 683, 2009

M. grandiflora. Dwarf, slow growing. Leaves and flowers smaller than type. Cultivated in Tampa, FL ca 1969.

‘Badenweiler’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Deep Purple Dream’ × ‘Star Wars’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany, 2015. Pink flowers, floriferous, long duration. Mature height estimated at 5-6 m.

‘Baldwin’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 683, 2009

M. grandiflora. A spontaneous plant from Baldwin County, AL selected for outstanding foliage, possibly by Tom Dodd Jr., before 1963. Leaves ca 19 × 11 cm, with unusually dark russet tomentose pubescence, easily visible due to upright growth habit of tree. Late flowering, flowers larger than type. A plant is still cultivated at U.S. National Arboretum (#24530).

‘Balkans’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

Described as a M. ×soulangeana type from Greater Zagreb, Croatia with flowers colored deep purple to the outside, lighter inside. Distributed by lunaplant.de circa 2018-2019.

‘Ballerina’

J. C. McDaniel, Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 7 (1): 3, fig. 4., 1970

M. ×loebneri (M. ×loebneri ‘Spring Snow’ × M. stellata ‘Waterlily’). Flowers white with pink blush at base. 30+ tepals. Easily propagated by cuttings.

‘Banana’

Magnolia 56(1) [Issue 107]: 44, 2021

M. denudata. Tiecheng Cui, Xi’an Botanical Garden, China, before 1995. Flowers white, upright, curving slightly before opening fully, with resemblance to a banana fruit. Limited release in the USA and present in the collections of a few botanical gardens.

‘Banana Flip’

Tawa Glen Nursery website, http://www.tawaglen.co.nz/, Accessed 28 March 2020

Tawa Glen Nurseries, New Zealand. Upright. Flowers yellow, with outer tepals falling in resemblance of a peeled banana.

‘Banana Split’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 66]: 25, 1999

([M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’] × ‘Elizabeth’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Flowers large, floppy, appearing with leaves. Comprised of nine tepals measuring 15 cm × 5 cm. Outer tepals cream with green base and purple stripes, inner tepals white with green base and purple midrib. Overall color cream, similar to and slightly paler than ‘Elizabeth’.

‘Banane Flambée’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Pink Surprise’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Characteristics uncertain.

‘Barbara Cook’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 20, 1994

M. dawsoniana. Chance seedling from the garden of Dr. Bowman, Fort Bragg, California, USA introduced by Briggs Nursery, Olympia, Washington, USA. Flowers an exceptional shade of pink. Named by Alleyne R. Cook in honor of his wife.

‘Barbara Nell’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 20, 1994

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI, 1979. Flowers creamy white with pink shading from tepal base to midrib. 10 tepals, ca 10 × 5 cm; inner tepals slightly smaller.

‘Barrington Belle’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

M. ×soulangeana. Selected by Roy G. Klehm, IL, from material remaining at University of Illinois following retirement of J. C. McDaniel. Flowers white with pale pink base, to 15 cm diameter. Very fragrant. Flowers comparable to M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba’, but the plant itself exhibits a more upright habit.

‘Beauty of Lamellen’

Magnolia 49(2) [Issue 96], 42-46, 2014

(M. sargentiana × M. campbellii). Height ca 14 m in 20 years. Flowers pink, to 33 cm diameter, 11 tepals. Originated in Lamellen, Cornwall, United Kingdom.

‘Belle Durio’

Rhod. with Cam. and Mag. 43: 25, 1991

M. ×foggii. Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers white, stamens pink.

‘Ben’s Red’

New Zealand Garden Journal, 16(1): 28, 2013

(‘Pegasus’ × ‘Vulcan’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand.

‘Benedetto’

Wyman, Amer. Nurseryman Ill (7), 1960

M. denudata. Flowers pale pink. Likely lost to cultivation.

‘Bernie Hollard’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 122, 2000

M. campbellii. Selection from New Zealand. Flowers rich pink with rose-lavender tone to inner tepals. Listed as subsp. mollicomata, though this lower taxon is no longer generally recognized. = M. campbellii ‘Hollard Form’

‘Betty’

Morris Arb. Bull. 19: 26, fig. 2. 1968

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. stellata ‘Rosea’). U.S. National Arboretum. Flowers greyed red-purple, to 20 cm. 12-19 tepals. Flowering mid-season. Named for Betty Kosar.

‘Betty Jessel’

Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 116, 2000

M. campbellii. (Open-pollinated seedling of M. campbellii ‘Darjeeling’). Sir George Jessel, from a seedling of a dark-form M. campbellii from the Botanical Garden of Darjeeling imported to England ca 1937. Dark purple flowers. Was referred to as ‘Darjeeling’, but that epithet was established for clones of the original tree in the botanical garden (see ‘Darjeeling’), so this tree was instead named ‘Betty Jessel’ after the introducer’s wife.

‘Beugnon’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. ×soulangeana. Selected at Castle Beugnon, France. Later flowering, approx. 2 wks after majority of M. ×soulangeana types.

‘Bicentennial’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook, p. 53-61, 2008

M. sargentiana × M. campbellii. Selected at Australian Bicentennial Arboretum. Flower buds similar in size to M. campbellii, but flower size closer to M. sargentiana. 12-15 tepals.

‘Biflora’

Lavallee, Arb. Segrez. 7. 1877

M. acuminata var. subcordata. More floriferous than the type, peduncles 2-flowered.

‘Biflora’

(Treyve, at Trevoux, Ain, France, about 1860), per Pampanini, Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort.41: 77 (1916)

M. grandiflora. Peduncles usually two-flowered.

‘Biloba’

Rehder & Wilson in Sargent, Pl. Wilson. 1: 392, 1913

M. officinalis. Leaves profoundly emarginate to bilobed, sinus 2-3 cm deep. Cultivated at Kiukiang, Kiangsi, China. Individuals with a degree of lobing to the leaf apices occur naturally where this species is cultivated. Callaway (1994) listed as a cultivar in accordance with article 21.5. However, treatment as a botanical variety is likely more appropriate considering current understanding of the genus. Per Dick Figlar (pers. comm. 2019), there is sufficient morphological and geographical evidence to support var. biloba.

‘Big Ben’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

Selection from New Zealand. Sold by lunaplant.de circa 2019. Large pink flowers.

‘Big Bertha’

M. ×loebneri. Selected by Carl Ferris Miller, Chollipo Arboretum, Korea. Raised from seed provided through the 1978 American Magnolia Society Seed Counter. Flowers pink, 10 cm diameter, 12-16 tepals. Compare ‘Leonard Messel’, but larger tree (to 5 m) with broader spread (Yong-Shik Kim, pers. comm, 2019).

‘Big Dude’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 19, 1989

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers rose pink with white interior, nodding. Very large, up to 35 cm diameter; 9-12 tepals. Fragrant.

‘Big Pink’

Magnolia 25(2) [Issue 48]: 16-18, 1990

M. ×soulangeana. Later than typical. Originated in Japan, sent to K. Sawada, Overlook Nurseries, Mobile, Alabama. Sold in the United States for some time as ‘Alexandrina’. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexandrina Japanese Form’.

‘Big Val’

New Zealand Garden Journal, 16(1): 28, 2013

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Caerhays Belle’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers large, pale pink, lower tepals long and drooping.

‘Billowing Cloud’

Leafland nursery catalog, p. 90, 2015

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Amabilis’ × M. cylindrica). Selected by Vance Hooper, Duncan and Davies Ltd., New Plymouth, New Zealand. 3 m height after 10 years. Flowers white, fragrant.

‘Binette’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(Possibly M. cylindrica × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’). Selected by Philippe de Spoelberch, Belgium. Flowers creamy- white.

‘Birgitta Aurora’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 16 July 2018

(M. cylindrica × M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’). Hybridized by Magaki (Japan) with seed resulting in this cultivar originally distributed via Magnolia Society International Seed Counter. Introduced by Tore Widenfalk circa 2004. Flowers pink with dark-pink base. Overall habit upright to fastigiate.

‘Birgitta Flinck’

Magnolia 24(2) [Issue 46]: 9, 1989

(M. virginiana × M. macrophylla). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Foliage glossy, comparable to M. virginiana though larger than typical of the species (to 35 × 10 cm). Compare sister seedling ‘Karl Flinck’, but with pure white flowers.

‘Bishop Michael’

Magnolia 51(1) [Issue 99]: 35, 2016

M. campbellii (Open-pollinated seedling of M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’). Compare ‘Lanarth’, but larger in size, earlier flowering by one week, and larger darker flowers (RHS 74A fading to 74B). Originally published as a selection of subsp. mollicomata, though this lower taxon is now generally considered synonymous with M. campbellii.

‘Bishop Peter’

Magnolia 51(1) [Issue 99]: 35, 2016

M. campbellii (Open-pollinated seedling of M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’). Compare ‘Lanarth’, but flowering earlier (mid-late February in St Austell, United Kingdom), and flowers paler. As subsp. mollicomata.

‘Bjuv’

Magnolia 31(1) [Issue 59]: 17, 1996

M. cylindrica. Selected by Philippe de Spoelberch, 1995 from material provided by Karl Flinck tracing its origin to seed collected in China by the Arnold Arboretum. Leaves elliptic with bluish tone. Flowers white with strong purple base; distinct sepaloids, albeit falling quickly and therefore may not be seen on all flowers.

‘Black Beauty’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 16 July 2018.

M. ×brooklynensis. Brooklyn Botanic Garden Kitchawan Research Station (#204). Flowers with dark purple exterior, white interior. Introduced by Fairweather Gardens, ca 2001. Per Shaw (2018), the epithet “Black Beauty” was an unofficial name for the cultivar but is now generally accepted.

‘Black Stem’

Louisiana Nurseries catalog, 1994-1996, p. 88

M. grandiflora. Selected by Bob Island, Charmwood Nursery. Dark pubescence to stems.

‘Black Swan’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag 58: 19, 2007

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Ruby’ × ‘Caerhays Surprise’). Hybridized by John Carlson, Gwent, Wales. Selected by Tim Thornton, England. Flowers dark red-purple.

‘Black Tulip’

Gardiner, Jim. Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 246-247, 2000

A trademark is claimed on “Black Tulip” precluding use as a cultivar epithet. See ‘JURMag1’.

‘Blackberry Rose’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, accessed 2019 December 10

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Ruby’ × ‘Vulcan’). Michael Gottschalk. Flowers dark purple in bud, almost reddish-black at the base. Opening to deep purple-pink. Foliage leathery. = M. ‘Brombeer’.

‘Blackwell’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 19, 1989

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Louisiana Nursery. Leaves glossy, undulating. Listed in Magnolia 23(2): 4, 1988 as ‘H. D. Blackwell’, but ‘Blackwell’ best preserves existing usage per Art. 29.2.

‘Blazing Beauty’

Heritage Seedlings & Liners, Inc. website. http://www.heritageseedlings.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

Flowers large, bright reddish-pink. Overall comparable to ‘Galaxy’, potentially a sister seedling. Not a U.S. National Arboretum introduction. Specific origin and introducer uncertain.

‘Blood Moon’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag 51: 21, 2000

M. sargentiana. Cultivated at Strybing Arboretum, San Francisco, CA. A dark flowered cultivar. Recorded as originating from Viscount Cranborne.

‘Bloomfield’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag 43: 24, 1991

M. tripetala. Original tree from Pennsylvania seed source raised by Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Leaves exceptionally long and thick. Flowers larger than average; extra tepals common. Fruit typical.

‘Blue Baby’

Gardening Express website, http://gardeningexpress.co.uk, Accessed 28 March 2020

M. acuminata var. acuminata (Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Blue Opal’ [perhaps by ‘Blue Opal’]). Compare ‘Blue Opal’ or ‘Seiju’, but with more intense blue shade to flowers.

‘Blue Opal’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 49, 2011

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Henry Foundation, Gladwyne, PA. Flower buds remarkably blue-green in color. = M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Henry Blue’.

‘Blushing Belle’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 16, 2001

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × ‘Caerhays Belle’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Compare ‘Caerhays Belle’, but much hardier, and flowers with narrower tepals and deeper pink interior.

‘Bogue’

Nearing, Gard. Chron. Amer. 45: 383. 1941

M. grandiflora. See ‘Edith Bogue’.

‘Bon Vintage’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. ×soulangeana (M. ×soulangeana ‘San Jose’ × M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’). Raised at Duncan and Davies, New Plymouth, New Zealand. Flowers medium-pink. Compare ‘Royal Crown’.

‘Borde Hill’

Johnstone, Asiatic Magnol. 62, fig. 7. 1955

M. campbellii. Leaves broadly oblong. Originally published as a selection of M. campbellii subsp. mollicomata, which is now regarded as a synonym of M. campbellii. Gardiner (2000) appears to consider this a cultivar due to distribution under the name by Hillier Nurseries. Callaway (1994) preferred to exclude it from cultivar status, based on limited published characteristics. Here, it is also not established because M. wilsonii ‘Borde Hill’ has priority, precluding establishment of this selection.

‘Borde Hill’

Gard. Chron. 87: 462, 1930

M. wilsonii. Flowers larger than the type.

‘Borealis’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 156, 1994

M. kobus. Callaway (1994) uses this cultivar epithet to describe northern, hardy forms of the species supposedly more vigorous and larger growing than the type. Due to the variability within M. kobus, it is likely more appropriate to refer to these as forma or consider them within the variability of the species.

‘Borreriana’

Gard. Chron. 9: 590. 1891; Bean, The Garden 46: 414, 1894

M. liliiflora. Flowers with long, narrow tepals.

‘Bouton Blanc’

Leroy, cat. p. 7. 1850, Angers, France

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Bovee’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 7, 1984-85, Springfield, Oregon

M. wilsonii. Height ca 8 m. Flowers pure porcelain white. Flowering May-June. Floriferous. Seed cones large and decorative. Probably in reference to Bovees Nursery, Portland, OR, which apparently closed ca 2018.

‘Bracken’s Brown Beauty’

Magnolia 23(2) [Issue 44]: 6, 1988

M. grandiflora. Selected by Ray Bracken from a nursery row in Easley, SC, 1968. Leaves dark green, undulating with rust-brown indumentum. Very floriferous, but flowers only ca half the size as typical.

‘Brenda’

RareFind Nursery catalog, p. 30, 2020

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Selected by Mike Stansberry, TN from open pollinated seed. 4 m in height and spread. Flowers deep yellow with 9 petals, 3 sepals.

‘Brett’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(‘Forrest’s Pink’ × unknown pollen parent). John Carlson, Gwent, Wales. Flowers large, pink, with stripes of darker pink present on outer tepals. Originated as an attempted cross between ‘Forrest’s Pink’ and ‘Lesley Jane’ which likely failed, with this cultivar thought to be resulting from apomixis or open pollination. Were this an apomict, it would be genetically identical to, and thus a synonym of, ‘Forrest’s Pink’. Photos on the Piet Vergeldt Nursery website (magnoliastore.com) website depict a plant with more evenly pink flowers than observed on plants labeled ‘Forrest’s Pink’ at The Morton Arboretum (Lisle, IL), but this could result from differing climatic conditions. Provisionally accepted.

‘Briar’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 22, 1994

M. sargentiana. From the garden of Dr. Bowman, Fort Bragg, CA and introduced by Briggs Nursery, Olympia, WA. New leaves contorted or tubular, becoming normal over a three-month period as they mature.

‘Bridal Bouquet’

M. floribunda. Tony Avent, Raleigh, NC. From seed collected at Kunming Botanical Garden in 1996. Only winter-hardy seedling from the lot.

‘Brixton Belle’

Rhod., Cam & Mag. 69: 72-74, 2018

([M. ×soulangeana ‘Sweet Simplicity’ × ‘JURmag1’] × ‘Sir Harold Hiller’). Vance Hooper, Brixton, North Taranaki, New Zealand. Introduced ca 2010. Flowers large and pink, comparable to M. campbellii.

‘Brixton Salmon’

Rhod., Cam & Mag. 69: 74, 2018

(‘Genie’ × ‘Sir Harold Hillier’). Vance Hooper, Brixton, North Taranaki, New Zealand. Salmon-pink flowers, large tree with long flowering season.

‘Broad Leaf Clone’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 5, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. salicifolia. Nomen nudum. Not established. No description.

‘Broadleas’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 7 August 2018 [As ‘Broadsleas’, spelling error]

M. sargentiana. Compact habit. Multi-tepal form. Compare ‘Purple Breeze’, but more pendant flower. “Multipetala Cowdray” appears to have been a working name for this plant, likely to distinguish it from the ‘Multipetal’ of Peter Smithers.

‘Brombeer’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

See ‘Blackberry Rose’.

‘Bronwyne’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’). Hybridized by Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Similar to Baldick’s “Ruth” but half the size in flower and plant.

‘Bronze Beauty’

Morris Arb. Bull 12:15, 1961

M. grandiflora. From a tree on the horticulture department grounds of the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL. New foliage with bronze markings.

‘Bronze Sentinel’

American Nurseryman 178(12), pp. 55-79(63-65), 1993

M. tamaulipana. John Fairey and Carl Schoenfeld, USA, from a wild collection in Mexico. Leaves flushed deep bronze, slowly aging to dark green.

‘Brooke Nicole’

Magnolia 47(1) [Issue 91]: 41-49, 2012

(‘Yellow Lantern’ × ‘Marillyn’). Mark Haimes, Boulder, CO. Flowers to 23 cm diameter. Six tepals, ca 8 cm in width with a pink blush.

‘Brown Velvet’

Journ. of Env. Hort. 14(3) 158-159, 1996

M. grandiflora. Was in use as an alternate name or trade designation circa 1995-2015, but not by the introducer, and ‘D. D. Blanchard’ still remained the most widely accepted epithet for this cultivar during this period. See ‘D. D. Blanchard’.

‘Brown Velvet’

Cistus Nursery mail order catalog, p. 90, Spring 2010

M. laevifolia. Upright habit. Dark hairs along branches, buds, and leaves. Per Art 30.2, this cultivar epithet cannot be accepted since it was used (though invalidly) for the above M. grandiflora selection. An alternate epithet should be established if possible.

‘Brozzonii’

Leroy, Cat. p. 79. 1873, Angers, France; Gard. Chron. III, 124: 191, 1948

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers tinged purplish rose extending along veins almost halfway, (slightly farther than in ‘Alba’). 9 tepals; ca 13 × 8 cm. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Brozzonii’; = M. denudata ‘Bruzzoni’

‘Bruzzoni’

Pampanini, Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 199, 1915

M. denudata See ‘Brozzonii’ (×soulangeana).

‘Bubbles’

Warners Nurseries website. http://warners.com.au/our-plants/plant/michelia-x-bubbles. Accessed 13 Feb 2018

M. ×foggii. Evergreen. Pyramidal habit. Foliage glossy, pointed. Flowers white, margins pale pink. Slightly fragrant.

‘Bucklands’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. sprengeri var. diva. Dark-tepaled selection (seedling) from Bucklands Garden, England.

‘Buksenrake Orange’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de. Accessed 10 Dec 2019

Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected by Jef van Meulder, Arboretum Bokrijk, Genk, Belgium. Similar to ‘Flamingo’ but flowering later and with a stronger pinkish-orange color.

‘Bullata’

Leroy, catalogue p. 64. 1856, Angers, France

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. Leaves likely bullate (blistered).

‘Burchelliana’

Sabine, Trans. Hort. Soc. London 3: 204, 1822

M. virginiana. Originating in the Garden of Whitley, Brames, and Milne at Fulham, London, England from a plant left behind by the previous owner, Mr. Burchell, prior to 1822. Double-flowered form with a distinct origin compared to ‘Gordoniana’. Sabine had difficulty describing the habit as his observations were limited to a “stooled” nursery stock plant.

‘Burgundy’

Wister, Swarthmore Plant Notes Ed. 3, 1 (1): 87, 1955-56

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers deep purple. First listed by W. B. Clarke & Co. in 1943 = M. ×soulangeana ‘Burgundy Rose’

‘Burgundy Glow’

Warners Nurseries website. http://warners.com.au/our-plants/plant/magnolia-burgundy-glow. Accessed 13 Feb 2018

M. ×soulangeana. Small, upright, spreading.

‘Burgundy Rose’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 4 (2): 2, 1967

M. ×soulangeana. Nomen nudum. Probably = ‘Burgundy’. See ‘Burgundy’.

‘Burgundy Spire’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag 63: 23, 2012

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × ‘Apollo’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers clear burgundy outside, cream inside. Nine upright tepals, remain upright as flowers mature; many lateral flower buds, blooms for several weeks.

‘Burgundy Star’

Gossler Farms Nursery website. https://gosslerfarms.com/. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

This is a trade designation which cannot be used as a cultivar epithet. See ‘JURmag4’.

‘Burncoose’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide. p. 187. 2000

M. sprengeri var. diva. Raised at Burncoose, Cornwall, England by Arnold Dance, head gardener. Flowers rose-purple, compare ‘Lanarth’ but redder in tone. Flowering April-May.= M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Burncoose Original’; = M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Burncoose Purple’

‘Burncoose Original’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. sprengeri var. diva See ‘Burncoose’.

‘Burncoose Purple’

Rankin, Magnolias: A Care Manual, p. 92, 1999

M. sprengeri var. diva. See ‘Burncoose’.

‘Burncoose Tennis Court’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. campbellii. Selected by David Clulow ca 1990. 60-80 year old plant as of 2019, thought to be a white form of Magnolia campbellii subsp. mollicomata. Dirr (2009) listing as dark pink-purple large flowers must be in error or in reference to other selection (perhaps ‘Burncoose’). = M. campbellii ‘Burncoose White’

‘Burncoose White’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. campbellii. Listed as subsp. mollicomata, generally now considered synonymous with M. campbellii. See ‘Burncoose Tennis Court’.

‘Busey’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 9(2): 12, 1973

M. acuminata. Wide, spreading branches. Uniform yellow fall leaf color. Self-incompatible flowers.

‘Butterbowl’

Magnolia 49(1) [Issue 95]: 37, 2014

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × ‘Sundance’). August Kehr hybrid selected by Philippe de Spoelberch, 1992. Seedlings from this cross were given the working name of “Yellow Dance”, though ‘Butterbowl’ was the only seedling retained (Koen Camelbeke, pers. comm., 2019). Flowers erect, tulip like, bowl shaped ca 6 × 16 cm. Yellow with faint pink stripes. Fragrance reminiscent of papaya. Peak flowering mid-late April (Belgium).

‘Butterflies’

Magnolia 24(2) [Issue 46]: 9, 1989

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. denudata ‘Sawada’s Cream’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers deep yellow, stamens red. 10-14 tepals.

‘Buzzard’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 10, circa 1973, Truro, Cornwall, England

(M. sargentiana × M. campbellii). Nigel Holman. Large rose-pink flowers. Considered inferior to ‘Hawk’.

‘Bylsiana’

van Houtte, Cat. 9163: 45. 1875, Ghent, Belgium

M. ×soulangeana. Named for the Byls brothers, nurserymen in Belgium. Specific characteristics uncertain. As M. denudata var. bylsiana in Pampanini, Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort.40: 199. 1915.

‘C4’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. ×loebneri ‘Leonard Messel’; colchicine-induced polyploid). John Weagle and Joe Harvey. Presumed hexaploid, potentially dodecaploid per Kehr. Flowers dark pinkish-red. Seed malformed and non-germinating.

‘CLTF1’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 27, 1998

M. grandiflora. Cherry Lake Tree Farms, Groveland, FL ca 1997. Selected from a field of seedlings. Pyramidal habit with dominant central leader. Wide branching angles, eliminating included bark in mature specimens. Flowers to 30 cm in diameter, more fragrant than typical. Marketed as MISS CHLOÉ®. =M. grandiflora ‘Chloe’

‘Caerhays’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 4, Circa 1973, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. campbellii. Leaves very large, flowers white. Treseder was offering seedlings of the plant at Caerhays without distinct characteristics. Not considered a cultivar. See note under ‘Caerhays Clone’.

‘Caerhays’

Burncoose & South Down Nurseries catalog, p. 40, 1988

M. dawsoniana. Flowers large, pale rose. Cultivar epithet used in reference to grafted plants from the original introduction to Caerhays in 1908. Distribution was very limited by 2019.

‘Caerhays’

Burncoose Nurseries website. http://www.burncoose.co.uk. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

M. sargentiana. “Caerhays” should only be used as a cultivar epithet once in the genus Magnolia (denomination class) and the M. dawsoniana selection under this name has priority. This selection is internally referred to as “Sargentiana Pure” at Caerhays but does not appear to be intended for wide introduction or distribution.

‘Caerhays Alba’

M. campbellii. Unpublished name referencing four M. campbellii var. alba from wild-collected seed at Caerhays with differences in habit and flower morphology compared to most named seedlings (Charles Williams, pers. comm., 2019). Multiple forms without clear characteristics. Not established.

‘Caerhays Belle’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog p. 6, Circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

(M. sargentiana × M. sprengeri). Floriferous selection with large, textured, bright salmon-pink flowers. Broad tepals.

‘Caerhays Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 1, Circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. campbellii. Flowers deep pink. From the late 1960’s into the early 1970’s, Treseder Nurseries sold two “clones” of M. campbellii: ‘Caerhays Clone’, with deep pink flowers, and ‘Caerhays White Clone’, with white flowers and large leaves. Callaway (1994) lists both. These were likely seedlings or otherwise indistinct forms hardly distinguishable from the species. Similar forms are apparently sold today, with listings on the Eisenhut website circa 2018-2019 for “Caerhays” or similar names. Some confusion or variability appears to be present, as the description for one form describes flower color as “Ivory White” though images show varying degrees of pink. See also ‘White Form’ (Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 76: 218. 1951), referencing a white-flowered M. campbellii growing at Caerhays from seed acquired from India.

‘Caerhays Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 5, Circa 1973, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. denudata. Eisenhut website listed a ‘Caerhays’ described as having pure white flowers, but photos depict pink flowers. Charles Williams of Caerhays Gardens, Cornwall, England, was unaware of this plant in 2019. Status uncertain. Most likely these were seedlings from a plant at Caerhays.

‘Caerhays Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 7, Circa 1973, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. obovata. Nomen nudum. Treseder (1978) does not list. Callaway (1994) lists but provides no description. Without a description, this must be rejected as not published per Article 27.1. The original M. obovata at Caerhays died in 2018 (Charles Williams, pers. comm., 2019).

‘Caerhays New Purple’

Gossler Farms Nursery website. https://gosslerfarms.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

See ‘F. J. Williams’.

‘Caerhays Philip’

Magnolia 51(1) [Issue 99]: 25-26, 2016

(M. sargentiana × M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’). Hybridized by F. J. Williams and Philip Tregunna. Vigorous tree with strong central leader. Flowers dark pink (RHS 73B), paler inside.

‘Caerhays Seedling’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

Apparently growing at Savill Gardens. Charles Williams of Caerhays was unaware of this plant circa 2019.

‘Caerhays Splendour’

Magnolia 51 [Issue 98]: 37-38, 2015

([M. sargentiana × M. campbellii] × M. campbellii ‘Darjeeling’). Hybridized by Jaimie Parsons, 2000. Upright, vigorous tree with strong central leader. Flowering mid-March (England). Flowers bright purple-pink. Some distribution under the temporary name “Jaimie Parson”.

‘Caerhays Surprise’

F. J. Williams in J. Roy. Hort. Soc. 99: 364-365, 1974

(M. campbellii × M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’). Caerhays Castle, Cornwall, England about 1962. Pink flowers, with darker blush to the outside.

‘Caerhays White Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 4, Circa 1973, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. campbellii. Flowers cup-shaped, 12 tepals. Eisenhut website lists flower color as “Ivory White” though images show varying degrees of pink. See ‘Caerhays Clone’.

‘Cahaba’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. virginiana var. australis. Tom Dodd III, Semmes, AL. Upright habit. Leaves tiny, <5 cm in length. Twigs pubescent. One of five small leaved selections by Tom Dodd III (See also: ‘Apalachee’, ‘Coosa’, ‘Perdido’, and ‘Tensaw’). Uncertain as to distinctions between selections.

‘Cairn Croft’

Magnolia 41(2) [Issue 80]: 4-9, 2006

M. ×thompsoniana. Selected by Peter del Tredici from a private estate in Westwood, MA. Leaves elliptic with undulating margins, ca 20 × 8 cm. Upper surface shiny green, lower surface silvery-white. Flowers creamy white, 11 tepals. Lemony fragrance.

‘Cairo’

Morris Arb. Bull. 17: 61-62, figs. 55-58, 1966

M. grandiflora. J. C. McDaniel, from a tree in Cairo, IL. Narrowly columnar. Leaves with green upper surface, greyish-brown lower surface. Flowers bowl shaped with nine tepals. Sweet fragrance.

‘Calla Leaf’

Magnolia 44(1) [Issue 85]: 9, 2006

M. grandiflora. Correspondence between Peter del Tredici and Phil Savage in 1985 indicates both ‘Calla Leaf’ and ‘Milli Calais’ as alternate names for the “calla leaf” form of M. grandiflora from Harwell Nurseries. = ‘Harwell’.

‘Calyculata’

Bosse, Vollst. Handb. Blumeng., Ed. 2, 2: 465, 1841

M. grandiflora. Flowers calyculate (bracts resemble calyx).

‘Cameo’

United States Patent #27222P3, 2015

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Sweet Simplicity’ × ‘JURmag1’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. 4 × 3 m in 10 years. Pyramidal or rounded habit. Flowers with reddish purple exterior, white blushed rose interior. Floriferous. Some resistance to magnolia leaf spot. Sister seedling to ‘Cleopatra’.

‘Camille’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 62: 60, 2011

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Pegasus’). Nigel Holman. 15-year-old ‘Pegasus’ seedling. Described as “growing very differently” than its parent, but no specifics given.

‘Canaliculata’

Bosse, Vollst. Handb. Blumeng., Ed. 2, 2: 465, 1841

M. grandiflora. Flowers with canaliculate (grooved) tepals. Cultivated in Bollwiller & Mulhouse, France.

‘Canary Charm’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com/. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. acuminata × M. ×loebneri ‘White Rose’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI, before 2011. Flowers light yellow. 7-13 tepals, usually 11. Buds hardy. Fragrant. Compare ‘Sunrise’, but flowers lighter in color.

‘Canary Yellow’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 677, 2009

M. acuminata. New Zealand. Flowers light yellow. Uncertain if pure acuminata as listed by Dirr (2009) or hybrid.

‘Candida’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 139, 1916

M. liliiflora. Pampanini’s description is puzzling as it appears to reference a white flowered form (”fiori candidi”) flowering with the leaves present. Flowering after leaf emergence is typical of M. liliiflora, but white flowered forms of that species are not known to occur either as spontaneous plants or cultivated selections. Perhaps this was an anomalous, late flowering or remontant selection of M. ×soulangeana. Apparently lost to cultivation and known only from Pampanini’s description.

‘Candolleana’

The Garden 44: 470, 1893

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers large, pure white, with broad tepals. Flowering 7-10 days after other M. ×soulangeana cultivars. Distributed by Louis Van Houtte, Ghent, Belgium. Apparently raised from a M. denudata seedling.

‘Candollei’

de Candolle, Prodr. 1: 80, 1824

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Flowers greenish. No further information. = M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Decandollei’

‘Candy Cane’

Callaway. The World of Magnolias, p. 213, 1994

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Selected by John Allen Smith, Magnolia Nursery, Chunchula, AL, from Todd Gresham’s hybrids at Gloster Arboretum, Gloster, MS (JG#28). Outer tepals rose at base fading to white at tip, with rose stripe running from base to tip; middle whorl of tepals has similar coloration, but slightly darker; inner whorl is even deeper rose-purple at the base. 9 erect tepals in three whorls; outer whorl is also somewhat reduced.

‘Cardonii’

Knight ex Loudon, Encycl. Trees & Shrubs 26. 1842

M. virginiana. Selected by Mr. Knight, Exotic Nursery, from a plant in the nursery of M. Cardon. Specific characteristics uncertain.

‘Carlos’

Magnolia 38(2) [Issue 74]: 26-27, 2003

(M. acuminata var. subcordata × M. ×veitchii). Selected by Koen Camelbeke and Philippe de Spoelberch, Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. Flowers creamy yellow. Petaloid tepals greenish yellow at base grading to pale yellow at apex ca 9 × 2.5 cm, sepaloids papery, greenish yellow. Flowering just before and with emerging leaves. Fragrant.

‘Carolina Compacta’

Taylor’s Nursery website. https://www.taylorsnursery.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

M. grandiflora. Compact, narrow habit, to 15 m.

‘Cascade Salmon’

Leafland nursery catalog, p. 92, 2015

Vance Hooper. Upright conical. Pink flowers from long, salmon-colored buds.

‘Cassiopeia’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, accessed 2019 December 10

(‘Rebekka’s Perfune’ × M. sprengeri var. sprengeri). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Large flowers, white, deep pink at tepal base.

‘Cathryn’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 16, 2005

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. campbellii). Vance Hooper, Duncan & Davies Nurseries, New Plymouth, Taranaki, New Zealand. Reaching 8 m height. Flowers deep purple with silvery coloration to mature tepal tips. Nine tepals, 14 × 9 cm.

‘Cecil Nice’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 2, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

(M. denudata × M. sargentiana). From Nymans Garden, West Sussex, England. Flowers white. A pink form or seedling of this plant may also exist as “Pink Cecil Nice” though little information is currently available.

‘Cedullo’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Caerhays Belle’). Flowers upright, deep pink. Previously distributed as C.B. #5.

‘Celestial’

Morris Arb. Bull. 14: 25, figs. 16-18, 1963

M. grandiflora. Wide, spreading habit. Leaves large, lustrous green with moderate indumentum. Flowers to 38 cm diameter.

‘Centennial’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 11(1): 11, 1975

M. stellata (Open-pollinated seedling of M. stellata ‘Rosea’). Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, MA. Introduced in 1972 in honor of the institution’s centennial. Flowers to 13 cm diameter, mostly white, but sometimes showing pink from its M. stellata ‘Rosea’ parent. =M. stellata ‘Harvard Centennial’

‘Centennial Blush’

United States Patent PP22248P2, 2010

M. stellata (Open-pollinated seedling of M. stellata ‘Centennial’). Michael A. Dirr, Athens, GA. Habit dense, pyramidal. Heavy flowering. Flowers with 46 tepals.

‘Cerise’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 26 January 2021

See ‘Ian’s Cerise’.

‘Chalcedony’

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. campbellii). Maurice Foster, Kent, England, 2016. Foliage variegated, but unstable (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020). Uncertain as to degree of distribution.

‘Chameleon’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 49, 2011

Shrubby habit. Flowering up to three times per year. Flowers small, rose-pink, cup-shaped. Potentially variety of M. amoena or M. zenii. = M. ‘Chang Hua’

‘Champaign’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. ×loebneri. Photos on Eisenhut website depict white flowers with ca 20 tepals. Joe McDaniel and Dennis Ledvina are listed as originators. A tree at Green Bay Botanical Garden, received from Dennis Ledvina, is a multitepal M. ×loebneri with slightly pink flowers, though less so than ‘Leonard Messel’. Presumably, the cultivar epithet is in reference to Champaign, Illinois, USA, the location of University of Illinois where J. C. McDaniel was faculty and made a multitude of selections from local trees. Dennis Ledvina may have acquired the plant at some point and distributed to Europe, though the specific origin and extent of distribution of this selection is unclear.

‘Chang Hua’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 9 August 2018

Little information available. Possibly, this selection originated in Chang Hua, Taiwan and “Chang Hua” was used as a temporary name during evaluation or early distribution until renamed ‘Chameleon’. See ‘Chameleon’.

‘Charisma’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(‘J. C. Williams’ × ‘Vulcan’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Similar to ‘J. C. Williams’, but flowers redder in color.

‘Charles Carlson’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘Star Wars’ × M. kobus ‘Norman Gould’). John Carlson, Gwent, Wales. Leaves dark, flowers pink, large.

‘Charles Coates’

Hilliers Man. of Trees and Shrubs, 1973

(M. sieboldii × M. tripetala). Chance seedling at Royal Botanical Gardens, Kew selected by Charles Coates (Propagator) in 1946 and named for him when it first flowered some 15 years later. Large shrub or small tree. Leaves comparable to M. tripetala, but smaller. Flowers white, upward facing, to 10 cm diameter, with crumpled tepals and red stamens. Pleasant fragrance. Rarely commercially available, though still cultivated in botanical gardens and arboreta.

‘Charles Dickens’

Morris Arb. Bull. 16: 8, 1965

M. grandiflora. Jewel Templeton, Winchester, TN. Selected at the garden of Charles Dickens, Franklin County, TN, from a tree persisting from Mr. Britton’s nursery that formerly occupied the property. Fruits vivid red, lasting 6-8 weeks in autumn. The selection has frequently been indicated as a tetraploid (McDaniel, 1970; 1973), with M. virginiana commonly assumed as the diploid parent, though McDaniel (1973) instead suggested M. macrophylla. However, tetraploidy was confirmed by a root tip squash from a seedling of ‘Charles Dickens’, so would have likely represented progeny from the cultivar as opposed to the cultivar itself. Flow cytometry data from Parris (2011) demonstrates ‘Charles Dickens’ is instead hexaploid, as expected for a M. grandiflora selection.

‘Charles Raffill’

The Crown Estate Commissioners, The Great Park, Windsor, Berkshire, England, in Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 88: 494, figs. 173-174, 1963

M. campbellii Raffillii Group. 12 × 6 m in 15 years. Flowers rose-bengal, to 23 cm diameter. 12 tepals. Slight fragrance. Type for the Raffillii Group (cross between eastern and western forms of M. campbellii during the 1920s and 1940s).

‘Charming Lady’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com/. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × ‘Toro’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. To ca 3 × 2 m in 10 years. Flower with a reddish-purple to pink exterior and pink interior.

‘Cheerful’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Ruby’ × ‘Iolanthe’). Hybridized by Tetsuo Magaki, distributed through the Magnolia Society International Seed Counter, and selected by Mark Haimes, Boulder, CO. Multi-stemmed shrub. Floriferous. Outer tepals dark pink with prominent stripe, inner tepals white. Flowering late April to early May.

‘Cherry Lips’

M. lotungensis. Unpublished name. Selected by Botanic-Treasures, Antwerpen, Belgium ca 2017. New foliage reddish in color.

‘Cherry Ripe’

New Zealand Garden Journal, 16(1): 28, 2013

(‘Caerhay’s Belle’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand.

‘China Doll’

Magnolia 21(1) [Issue 79]: 17, 2006

M. denudata. Cultivated unsuccessfully at Powell Gardens. No further information.

‘China Form’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. denudata. Flowers white, with small purple base. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘China Town’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 50, 2011

M. sinostellata. Clonal distribution of M. sinostellata from the locality in Jing Ning. Slow-growing. Flowers white to pale pink, darker at base. Does not appear to have been selected for any particular characteristics compared to the typical species. Described in catalog as “stellata type”. Sometimes listed or distributed as ‘Jing Ning’.

‘Chinese Cream Form’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. cylindrica. Nomen nudum. Photos on magnoliastore.com depict white flower with cream-yellow base. Not established. The word “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958 (Art 21.16).

‘Chloe’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 685, 2009

See ‘CLTF1’.

‘Chollipo’

Magnolia 23(2) [Issue 43]: 24, 1987

M. stellata. Carl Ferris Miller, named tentatively in 1987. Was purchased as ‘Maharanee’, though turned out to be a M. stellata similar to ‘Chrysanthemumiflora’, with significantly more than 20-30 tepals.

‘Chollipo’

M. zenii. Flowers white. From Chollipo Arboretum, Republic of Korea. Distinct from M. stellata selection of same name, and not established as that selection has priority for this cultivar epithet.

‘Chopollipo’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(M. obovata × M. ×veitchii). Nomen nudum. Purported cross seems dubious as these two species are not known to hybridize. Likely an error.

‘Chrysanthemiflora’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 54:44, 2003

See ‘Chrysanthemumiflora’.

‘Chrysanthemumiflora’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 159, 1994

M. stellata (Open-pollinated seedling of M. stellata ‘Rubra’). Selected by Wada of Hakoneya Nurseries, Yokohama, Japan. Rounded habit, to ca 3 × 1.5 m in 10 years. Flowers clear pink to white, >40 tepals. = M. stellata ‘Chrysanthemiflora’

‘Chrystal Tulip’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

See ‘Crystal Tulip’.

‘Chyverton’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 1, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. campbellii. Flowers white. Seedling raised from the Caerhays mother tree.

‘Chyverton’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 62: 53-64, 2011

M. dawsoniana. A seedling gifted to F. J. Williams by Nigel Holman in the 1950’s. Distinct from ‘Chyverton Red’. This epithet cannot be established due to conflict with the M. campbellii selection published 1965.

‘Chyverton Dark Form’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 5, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. sargentiana. Flowers rose-purple. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘Chyverton Pale Form’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 5, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. sargentiana. Flowers white to pale-pink. Very large. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘Chyverton Red’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 5, circa 1973; Truro, Cornwall, England

M. dawsoniana. Flowers crimson, fading to carmine pink, narrow tepals. As ‘Chyverton’ in Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, circa 1965, though use of ‘Chyverton Red’ avoids conflict with M. campbellii ‘Chyverton’.

‘Cinnamon Twist’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 683, 2009

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Plantation Tree Co, Selma, AL. Leaves slightly twisted.

‘Citriodora’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 199, 1915

M. denudata. Little known, historic French hybrid. Apparently with lemon scented flowers. Basionym: M. conspicua cv. citriodora (Loudon, Arb. Frut. Brit. 1: 279. 1838).

‘Claret Cup’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 88: 494-495, fig. 172, 1963

M. sprengeri var. diva. Flowers purple, inside fading to white. 12-14 tepals. To 20 cm diameter. Slight fragrance.

‘Clarke’

Gossler Farms Nursery, plant list, 1971, Springfield, Oregon, USA

M. campbellii. Grafted plants from the old W. B. Clarke Nursery in San Jose, CA. Uncertain as to distinct characteristics.

‘Clarke’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 14, 1988-89, Springfield, Oregon, USA

M. dawsoniana. Flowers soft pink, floriferous, resembling “thousands of pink Cattleya orchids.” From W. B. Clarke Nursery, San Jose, California. Cannot be established. M. campbellii selection with same epithet has priority. = M. dawsoniana ‘Clark’s Var.’

‘Clark’s Var.’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 2, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. dawsoniana. Not established. Per article 21.16, cultivar epithet cannot contain variety or its abbreviation (var.) if published after 1958. See M. dawsoniana ‘Clarke’.

‘Claudia Wannamaker’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 19, 1989

M. grandiflora. J. Brailsford, Shady Grove Nursery, Orangeburg, SC. Broad pyramidal habit. Leaves small, ca 14 × 7 cm, heavily indumented. Flowers also small, ca 9 cm diameter. Flowering May to September.

‘Cleopatra’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 63: 21, 2010

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Sweet Simplicity’ × ‘JURmag1’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Introduced ca 2009. Upright to pyramidal habit. Flowers reddish-purple.

‘Clone 2’

Derenne and Grossin, Une Collection Francaise De Magnolia, Arboretum des Grandes Bruyeres, 2012.

See ‘Tor’.

‘Coates’

Gossler Farms Nursery, plant list, 1973, Springfield, OR

M. ×soulangeana. Similar to ‘Royal Crown’. Upright, round habit, to ca 8 m.

‘Coco’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 683, 2009

M. grandiflora. Head-Lee Nursery, Seneca, SC. Pyramidal, long flowering period. Distinct from the species Magnolia coco DC.

‘Cody’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. stellata. Flowers deep pink.

‘Coimbra’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. ×soulangeana. From Coimbra, Portugal. Flowers large, pink.

‘Colossus’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 28, 1998

M. sieboldii (M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii ‘Genesis’ × sieboldii; colchicine-induced polyploid). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. To ca 3 m in height and spread in 7 years. Leaves ca 30 × 15 cm. Flowers larger than type, to 15 cm with 10-17 textured tepals. Floriferous and fragrant. Dr. Kehr initially suspected as hexaploid as he believed seed parent ‘Genesis’ was tetraploid and hybridization with a diploid sieboldii pollen parent would result in triploid progeny. Inducing polyploidy of said progeny would then result in a hexaploid. However, Parris (2011) confirmed as diploid based on flow cytometry data. This may have resulted from failure to induce polyploidy (or less likely, apomixis) at some stage in the process.

‘Columbia’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 344, 1996

M. ×veitchii See ‘Columbus’.

‘Columbus’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 44: 34, 1992

M. ×vetichii (M. ×veitchii × M. denudata). U.S. National Arboretum hybrid selected by John Bond. Name references the Atlantic crossing made by the plant when shipped to England. Not an official U.S. National Arboretum introduction. = M. veitchii ‘Columbia’

‘Columnar Pink’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

See ‘Alex’.

‘Columnaris’

A. & E. Kay, Pl. World Florida. 32. 1933.

M. grandiflora. Erect habit comparable to a Lombardy poplar. Leaves and flowers mid-size.

‘Concolor’

Siebold & Zuccarini, Abh. Math.-Phys. Kl. Akad. Wiss. Muenchen 4 (2): 187. 1845

M. obovata. Leaves green on both surfaces. The variety described by Siebold & Zuccarini is largely considered synonymous with the species today, and there are few to no references of cultivated selections utilizing this name.

‘Como’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56: 18-19. 2005

M. campbellii (Open-pollinated seedling of M. campbellii). From Australia. Flowers very pale pink, nearly white.

‘Concolor’

Enm. Pl. Japon. 1: 16, 1873

M. salicifolia. James H. Veitch, introduced from Japan ca 1892. Leaves with green lower surface. Habit more spreading, branches stouter, flowers larger (with broader tepals to 2.5 cm width), and flowering later compared to the typical species (Bean 1933). = M. salicifolia ‘Mount Hakkoda’

‘Conger’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 15, 1984

M. grandiflora. Inez B. Conger, Arcadia, FL. Flowers large, to 35 cm diameter.

‘Connor’

New Zealand Garden Journal, 16(1): 28, 2013

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Pegasus’). Introduced by Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Compare ‘Ian’s Cerise’.

‘Conspicua’

Borromeo, letter dated 6 June 1915, to Pampanini, Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 78. 1916

M. grandiflora. 21 meters in height. Cultivated in Isola Borromeo, Italy. Said to be 100 years old.

‘Conspicua Alba’

Iufer Landscape Co., nursery list, 1961, Salem, OR

M. ×soulangeana. Nomen nudum. Probably = M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba’ or potentially M. denudata.

‘Cook’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018. (M. sargentiana × M. campbellii). Origin in England. Described on Piet Vergeldt Nursery website (magnoliastore.com) as typical seedling of robusta × mollicomata. Must be distinct from ‘Cook Splendour’ if robusta (syn: M. sargentiana) is a parent.

‘Cook Splendour’

Magnolia Grove website. http://www.magnoliagrove.co.nz/index.php/nz-raised-magnolia-collection. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

M. campbellii. From a seedling distributed to Pukeiti Rhododendron Trust ca 1951. Of the selections commonly cultivated in New Zealand, this is the closest to true M. campbellii (as opposed to mollicomata or ‘Charles Raffil’).

‘Cool Cassis’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘Big Dude’ × ‘Vulcan’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Large, pink flowers. Compare M. campbellii.

‘Coosa’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. virginiana var. australis. Introduced by Tom Dodd III, Semmes, AL. Upright habit. Leaves tiny, <5 cm in length. Twigs pubescent. One of five small leaved selections by Tom Dodd III (See also: ‘Apalachee’, ‘Cahaba’, ‘Perdido’, and ‘Tensaw’). Uncertain as to distinctions between selections.

‘Copeland Court’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, circa 1973, p. 11, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. sprengeri var. diva. Compact, erect tree with startling vivid pink flowers.

‘Copperstop’

Cistus Nursery catalog, p. 46, Fall 2011

M. laevifolia. Cistus Nursery introduction before 2011, from seeds collected by Roger Warner in southern China. Stems and leaves pubescent. Flowers white, fragrant, and blooming both spring and fall.

‘Coppertop’

Woodlanders, Inc., nursery catalog, p. 27, 1990-91, Aiken, SC

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. No further information.

‘Cora’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × ‘Gretel Eisenhut’). Klaus Bodzsar, Weinheim, Germany. Vigorous. Flowers pale pink, darker towards base of tepal.

‘Coral Lake’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 28, 1998

(‘Legend’ × ‘Butterflies’). Introduced by David G. Leach Research Station of the Holden Arboretum. Semi-fastigiate, to ca 3-4 m in 10 years. Flowers blended with pink shading and vertical yellow stripes, to ca 18 cm diameter. 11 tepals. Flowering late, but before expansion of leaves. = M. ‘Coral’

‘Coral Pink’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 50, 2011

Described as “Best orange-like colour in magnolia breeding so far”. Probably = ‘Coral Reef’. See ‘Coral Reef’.

‘Coral Reef’

Magnolia 37(1) [Issue 71: 10-15, 2002

(M. acuminata × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Dark Diva’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers precocious, coral-pink. = M. ‘Coral Pink’

‘Coral Sunset’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

Dennis Ledvina. Probably = ‘Pastel Sunset’. See ‘Pastel Sunset’.

‘Coral’

Plantentuin Esveld website (http://www.esveld.nl). Accessed 6 April 2018

Nomen nudum. See ‘Coral Lake’, ‘Coral Reef’, or ‘Pickard’s Coral’.

‘Cornish Chough’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 58: 16-20, 2007

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Caerhays Belle’). Selected by Tim Thornton. Flowers large, pale pink.

‘Cosmic Gem’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com/. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. ×brooklynensis × [M. kobus ‘Norman Gould’ × M. ×loebneri ‘White Rose’]). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers goblet-shaped, pink, purple, and white with six tepals. Mid-spring. Fragrant.

‘Cotton Candy’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 63: 21, 2012

(‘Red Baron’ × ‘Blushing Belle’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers large, medium pink with no green or purple coloration. 9 broad tepals.

‘Cow Trough’

Gresham hybrid, introducer uncertain. Flowers white, large, consisting of 12 tepals with slight light pink base (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2015).

‘Cream Tilkin’

Jef van Meulder, Arboretum Bokrijk, Genk, Belgium. Compare ‘Pink Tilkin’, but more fastigiate and with cream-white flowers.

‘Crescendo’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 63: 21, 2012

(‘Yellow Lantern’ × ‘Big Dude’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers large, pink. Cultivar epithet derives from “crescendo’ effect of very small buds opening to huge flowers.

‘Cressy Garland’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Pegasus’ [perhaps by M. sargentiana]). Ian Baldick, New Zealand.

‘Crimson Goddess’

Fairweather Gardens nursery catalog, p. 66, 2008

(‘Helen Fogg’ × M. acuminata var. subcordata). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers had not been observed at time of publication in Fairweather Gardens catalog. Provisionally accepted pending more detailed description.

‘Crimson Stipple’

Morris Arb. Bull. 13: 48, 1962

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii). White flowers with crimson-red “pinpoints”, providing an overall pink glow.

‘Crispa’

Loudon, Hort. Brit. 226, 1830

M. grandiflora. Leaves with curled margins. M. grandiflora ‘Elliptica-Crispa’

‘Crofts’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 79. 1994

M. virginiana var. australis. Selected by J. C. McDaniel, IL from Polk County, TN, ca 1976. Upper leaf surface exceptionally glossy.

‘Crowley’s Ridge’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 22, 1994

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Selected by Richard B. Figlar, Pomona, NY, from a spontaneous tree on Crowley’s Ridge, Avert, MO. More pendulous branching habit than typical. Leaves broadly elliptic, nearly glossy, with lower surface light green. Flowers smaller than typical. This plant conforms to the description of M. acuminata var. ozarkensis published by Hardin (1954), per Figlar extirpated from the wild. Herbarium specimen (voucher # 1460) located at Clemson University.

‘Crystal Bay’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 23, 1994

M. grandiflora. Selected by Richard B. Figlar, Pomona, NY from a group of seedlings that originated at Monrovia Nursery, Azusa, CA. Abundant axillary branches. Ultimately large spreading form with considerable branching. Leaves with little or no indumentum on undersurfaces. Flowers bright white, 12 tepals.

‘Crystal Chalice’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 9 August 2018

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Maurice Foster. Flowers white, bowl-shaped.

‘Crystal Tulip’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

From China. Green bark, leaves elongate. Flowers white with pink base to inner tepals. Sold by lunaplant.de circa 2019. = M. ‘Chrystal Tulip’

‘Cuckoo’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag 58: 16-20, 2007

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’ × M. campbellii). Hybridized by Tim Thornton, England. Flowers pink, long flowering season.

‘Cup Cake’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 214, 1994

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii). Selected by Ken Durio, Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA. Flowers cream colored, up to 30 cm across. Fragrant.

‘Curly Head’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 225, 1994

(M. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI, 1990. Tall tree with dense, upright habit. Flowers pastel pink and yellow on white. Leaf margins revolute. = M. ‘Editor Hopkins’

‘Curly Locks’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(M. ×brooklynensis × M. acuminata). Philippe de Spoelberch, Belgium. Shrubby, fastigiate. Flowers pale white-yellow-green, curled.

‘Curley Cew’

Unpublished name. Sold by Veke Nursery, Republic of Korea, ca 2018. Photos depict pink Yulania-type with 6-9 tepals.

‘Cyathiflora’

Rinz, catalog 1853, Frankfurt Am Main, Germany

M. denudata. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Cyathiformis’.

‘Cyathiformis’

Rinz, per Koch, Dendrologie 1: 376, 1869

M. ×soulangeana. Rinz, Frankfurt Am Main, Germany, ca 1850. Flowers cup-shaped. Color uncertain. Koch (1869) lists as white, Rehder (in Bailey, 1919) describes as light purple, and Krüssmann (1961) as vivid purple with white margins. Perhaps more than one form may have existed, or flowers were variably pale purple. = M. denudata ‘Cyathiflora’

‘Cylindrica’

M. ×soulangeana. Introduced by Upper Bank Nursery, Media, PA, circa 1940. A few plants were cultivated at the Arnold Arboretum in Jamaica Plain, MA under this name. No description available. Perhaps a seedling of M. cylindrica.

‘Daisy Diva’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 15, 2000

(M. ×soulangeana × M. sprengeri). Selected by Dr. M. L. A. Robinson, England, 1999. Upright, to 6 m in 14 years. Flowers white, to 30 cm diameter, with a basal stain of purple fading toward tepal tips. 12-14 tepals.

‘Dali Velvet’

Magnolien und Tulpenbäume, p. 177, 2020

M. laevifolia. Leaves with velvety-brown indumentum.

‘Danxin Hanxiao’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook, p. 52, 2013

Kunming Institute of Botany. China. Evergreen, red flowers.

‘Daphne’

Magnolia 38(2) [Issue 74]: 27-28, 2003

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × ‘Gold Crown’). August Kehr hybrid selected by Koen Camelbeke and Philippe de Spoelberch, Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. Compact. Flowers with deep yellow petaloid tepals ca 9 cm long, and greenish-yellow sepaloid tepals ca 3 cm long.

‘Darjeeling’

Extr. Proc. P. 17, Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 92. 1967

M. campbellii. From a tree at Darjeeling Botanic Garden, India, with remarkably dark purple flowers, upright in form and with a long flowering season. See also ‘Betty Jessel’, a seedling from this plant cultivated under this name prior to 1972.

‘Dark Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 10, circa 1973, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. sargentiana. Flowers fuchsia purple fading to mauve, nodding from horizontal buds.

‘Dark Cru’

(M. sargentiana ‘Blood Moon’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Claret Cup’). Unpublished name. A selection by Maurice Foster, Kent, England. Flowers dark red-purple, cup-shaped (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020).

‘Dark Diva’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. sprengeri var. diva. Phil Savage selection from seed collected at Strybing Arboretum. Dark pink flowers, hardier than typical diva clone (‘Diva’). = M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Mystery Diva’

‘Dark Raiment’

Morris Arb. Bull. 13: 47, 1962

(M. liliiflora × M. ×veitchii). D. Todd Gresham, Santa Cruz, California, USA. Leaves dark green, coriaceous, the lowermost becoming colorful like sassafras in the autumn. Flowers red-violet, 12 tepals. Outer 8 tepals form a cup, reflexing later, the inner 4 remain upright and clasp the gynoecium.

‘Dark Shadow’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 2, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid selected by John Giordano (JG#30). Compact oval, to ca 9 m. Base of flower buds deepest ruby-red, almost black in intensity, lightening slightly at the tip; ivory white interiors contrast dramatically with exterior rich red; central boss of stamens dark burgundy. 4-5” across.

‘Dark Splendor’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 175, 1994

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’ × M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’). Introduced 1966. Otto Spring Nursery, Okmulgee, OK. Tall tree, flowers dark velvety red, with little or no purple shading.

‘Darkest Purple’

Overlook Nurseries catalog 1948-1949, Crichton, Mobile, AL

M. liliiflora. Overlook Nurseries, ca 1949. Flowers rich purple, 9 long, narrow tepals. Blooms face outward rather than upright.

‘Darrell Dean’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 16, 1984

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid selected by Louisiana Nurseries (LA#47; G66#9). Flowers wine red, 9-12 tepals, to 30 cm diameter. = M. ‘Gresham 66-9’

‘Dauber’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 684, 2009

M. grandiflora. Origin in Stewartstown, PA. Cold-hardy and early flowering.

‘David’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 28, 1998

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. officinalis var. biloba). Selected by Polly Hill, West Tisbury, MA, registered 1998. From seed of M. officinalis var. biloba acquired from Philip Seitner via 1981 Magnolia Society seed exchange. Leaf apices not bi-lobed, and flowers are taller and crinkled, suggesting M. tripetala as the pollen parent. Named in honor of Dr. David Smith, originator and benefactor of the Polly Hill Arboretum.

‘David Clulow’

Magnolias and Their Allies, p. 226, 1998

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid selected by John Giordano (JG#20; G66#1184). Vigorous, branches susceptible to summer storms. Flowers “cup and saucer” form.

‘David Kirchoff’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 684, 2009

M. grandiflora. Habit more compact and leaves smaller than type. Possibly a hybrid with M. virginiana.

‘Dawn’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 12(2): 28-29, 1976

M. stellata. Selected by Harold Hopkins from a residential neighborhood in Bethesda, MD. Flowers pale pink, 40+ tepals. Compare ‘Waterlily’ or ‘Royal Star’, but pinker and with more tepals.

‘Daybreak’

Magnolia 27(1) [Issue 51]: 25, 1991

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Tina Durio’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, 1989. Upright, flowers orange-pink. Late season. Intensely fragrant.

‘DC-4’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 677, 2009

Compare M. ‘Elizabeth’, but flowers larger and darker yellow. Photos on Eisenhut website depict pink midrib on innermost tepals, potentially indicating M. ×brooklynensis as a parent. Presumably an unnamed, unregistered selection by David Clulow.

‘D. D. Blanchard’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 19, 1989

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Robbins Nursery, Willard, NC. Compact, upright habit. Leaves with intense brown indumentum on lower surface. Flowers typical. = M. grandiflora ‘Brown Velvet’

‘Deborah’

New Zealand Garden Journal, 16(1): 28, 2013

(‘First Flush’ × M. campbellii). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers white with red base.

‘Decandollei’

Koch, Hort. Dendr. 4. 1853

M. acuminata var. acuminata. See Magnolia acuminata var. acuminata ‘Candollei’.

‘Deep Purple Dream’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 206, 1994

M. ×soulangeana (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Selected at Gloster Arboretum, MS from seedlings of open-pollinated ‘Lennei’ purchased from Tom Dodd Nursery, Semmes, AL. Flowers dark purple, bowl shaped as with ‘Lennei’, but flowering later. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Purple Dream’

‘Deering Street’

M. grandiflora listing on UMN Plant Info website. Misspelling for ‘Dearing Street’, an earlier name for ‘Phyllis Barrow’. See ‘Phyllis Barrow’.

‘Delia Williams’

Magnolia 45(1) [Issue 87]: 26-28, 2010

(M. sargentiana × M. campbellii). Originated at Caerhays Castle. Flowers clear pink, fading to white.

‘Delicatissima’

Morris Arb. Bull. 13: 49, 1962

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Dwarf, slow growing. Flowers small, bell-shaped, white with rose-pink stain. Not established as the cultivar epithet is comprised entirely of Latin (Art. 21.11).

‘Delight’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 96, pt 8, p. 258, Aug 1971

Pink, fastigiate. Growing in the Old Rectory, Aldon, Molling, Kent, England, circa 1971.

‘Den Pobedy’

Magnolia 56(1) [Issue 107]: 45, 2021

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Black Beauty’ × ‘Red Baron’). Svetlana Bulycheva, Moscow, Russia, ca 2015, from a Dennis Ledvina cross. Flowers dark pink-purple, to 15 cm diameter with six petaloid and three reduced sepaloid tepals. Overall comparable to ‘Black Beauty’, but more pink-purple to coloration inner tepal surface.

‘Dennis Ledvina’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Pink Royalty’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected by Olav Kalleberg, Norway. Columnar. Flowers dark pink, nine tepals, late season.

‘Dermot O Neill’

Selection from Mount Congreve at Kilmacurragh, Ireland. Raised in 1961 by the late garden director, Herman Dool. Rich pink flowers, broad ovate tepals (Pam Hayward, pers. comm, 2019).

‘Deryk’

Magnolia Grove website. http://www.magnoliagrove.co.nz/index.php/nz-raised-magnolia-collection. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Genie’). Flowers dark pink, appearing red in some lighting conditions.

‘Diana’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 26 January 2021

(M. denudata × ‘Genie’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany ca 2020. Bright pink flowers with darker base. Broad tepals. Floriferous, late summer remontancy.

‘Dick Banks’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

M. campbellii Raffillii Group. Selected by Lawrence Banks. Heavy flowering in alternate years.

‘Dioneses Bowl’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. grandiflora. Harry Heineman, Scituate, MA, before 2011. White flowers, bowl-shaped. Probably intended as “Dionysus Bowl”. Possibly = M. grandiflora ‘Scituate’, but that selection is not listed as having significant bowl-shaped flowers.

‘Discolor’

Ventenat, Jard. Malm. T. 240. 1803

M. liliiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Distinct’

Unpublished name. Hybrid by Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Complex cross involving M. ×loebneri ‘Encore’, M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexandrina’, and M. ×loebneri ‘White Rose’ (Tom Trzebiatowski Jr., pers. comm., 2017). Was distributed by Klehm’s Song Sparrow Nursery, Avalon, WI in early 2019 and Brotzman’s Nursery, Madison, OH in 2021. A plant at The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL from this distribution exhibited large white flowers ca 15-20 cm diameter consisting of nine tepals with a dark pink base to the outer tepal, grading to a pink stripe at the apex.

‘Diva’

Stapf, Bot. Mag. 152: T. 9116, 1927

M. sprengeri var. diva. The original dark flowered clone introduced by E. H. Wilson following an expedition to Hubei, China in 1901. Flowers dark rose, light pink inside, ca 20 cm diameter, before leaves. Fragrant. Type tree at Caerhays Castle.= M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Purpurascens’

‘Diva No 711’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 699, 2009 [as ‘Diva #711]

M. sprengeri var. diva. Hardy form selected by Louisiana Nursery. Per Article 21.19, this epithet could not be established due to use of the # character. Article 35.8 allows establishment if replaced with abbreviation “No”.

‘Diva Simpson Form’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018.

M. sprengeri var. diva. New Zealand. No description. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘Dodd No 4’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 4 (2): 2, 1967 [as Dodd #4]

M. ×soulangeana. Dark pink-flowered form selected by Tom Dodd, Mobile, AL. Was available for sale via Kingsville Nurseries in 1967, and later sent to the U.S. National Arboretum for evaluation. Does not appear to have been formally named or introduced. Per Article 21.19, this epithet could not be established due to use of #. Article 35.8 allows establishment if replaced with contraction “No”. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Tom Dodd seedling #4’

‘Dog Cage’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 708, 2009

Gresham hybrid. Vigorous. Flowers large, bright pink.

‘Dolly Horn’

Conifer Gardens Nursery website, http://www.conifer.com.au. Accessed 18 December 2018

([M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × M. campbellii] × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Tree to 5 m. Flowers large, goblet shaped, to 25 cm. White with light pink flush.

‘Donna’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 162, 1994

M. ×loebneri. Selected by Harry Heineman, Scituate, MA. Flowers white, flat, to 20 cm diameter. Arose as a seedling from open-pollinated M. stellata.

‘Doris’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. liliiflora. Flowers large, purple, persisting longer than type.

‘Dorsopurpurea’

Makino, Jour. Jap. Bot. 6 (4): 8. 1929

M. ×soulangeana. Hakoneya Nurseries, Numazu-Shi, Japan. Flowers very large. Basionym: M. dorsopurpurea (M. liliiflora x M. denudata) in Wada, Jap. Gard. Treas. p. 36, circa 1925.

‘Dottie Grosse’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 19, 1989

M. ×soulangeana. Low, dense habit. Wider than tall; lower branches prostrate on the ground. Leaves one-half to two-thirds typical size.

‘Double Diamond’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 61: 134-135, 2010

M. denudata. Multitepal form imported from China. Photo by Sonia Dobner on lunaplant.de appears to show a flower with 14-17 pure white tepals.= M. denudata ‘Dubbel’

‘Double Trouble’

New Zealand Garden Journal, 16(1): 28, 2013

(‘Apollo’ × ‘Vulcan’). Hybridized by Ian Baldick, New Zealand.

‘Double de Nantes’

Hillier & Sons, Cat. Trees, Autumn 1913 - Spring 1914, Winchester, England

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Doubled Form B’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. sprengeri var. diva. Kehr. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘Dover’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 9(2): 12-13, 1973

M. acuminata. Sixty-year-old tree on a farm near Dover, IL, with downswept lower branches. It is apparently self-compatible to some degree, and frequently produces fruits topped by a bud or twig.

‘Dr. Henry Orr’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 684, 2009

M. grandiflora (‘Satin Leaf’ × ‘Charles Dickens’). Dense habit, little to no pruning required.

‘Dr. Massey’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. stellata. Multi-tepal form with white flowers from pink buds.

‘Dr. Merrill’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 4 (1): 3, 1967

M. ×loebneri See ‘Merrill’.

‘Dr. Van Fleet’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 4 (1): 3, 1967

M. loebneri (M. kobus × M. stellata ‘Rosea’). Erect habit with ovoid crown. Flowers pinkish, symmetric.

‘Dubbel’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 50, 2011

M. denudata. China. Many more petals than normal. Must = ‘Double Diamond’, a double-flowered M. denudata of Chinese origin.

‘Dude’s Brother’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

(M. sprengeri × M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’). Hybridized by Phil Savage, selected by Koen Camebeke and Philippe de Spoelberch, Belgium. Sister seedling of ‘Big Dude’. Flowers resemble ‘Hot Lips’, but smaller, darker, and appearing later. Some distribution as R14-#5.

‘Dude’s Sister’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’). Sister seedling of ‘Big Dude’ by Phil Savage (R10-7), raised by Phillipe de Spoelberch, Belgium. Compare ‘Big Dude’ but earlier flowering and ‘Dude’s Brother’ but paler flower.

‘Dunlap’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 1, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England [as ‘Dunlop Clone’]

M. acuminata. Late leaf-out. Selected from a tree in Savoy, IL.

‘Dusty Pink’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag 60: 40, 2009

M. sprengeri var. diva. Erland Ejder, Alnarp, Sweden. Collected in Hubei, China. 12-15 tepals, 12 cm length.

‘Dwarf’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 704, 2009

M. virginiana. Selected by Don Shadow, USA. Dwarf. Leaves with notched apices.

‘Dwarf Form’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 77, 1994

M. virginiana. An Oliver Freeman collection from Coastal North Carolina cultivated at U.S. National Arboretum (#7780). Listed by Callaway (1994), but this epithet cannot be established due to use of the word “form” (Art. 21.16). The U.S. National Arboretum currently treats this as an unnamed dwarf plant as opposed to a cultivar.

‘Dwarf No 1’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. loebneri (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×loebneri ‘Ballerina’). Height: Low growing. Flowers at an early age. Listed in catalog as “Dwarf Nr. 1”, but ‘Dwarf No 1” is the preferred contraction.

‘Early Lenne’

W. B. Clarke & Co., List 5859, p. 51. 1958, San Jose, California

M. ×soulangeana. Compare ‘Lennei’, but flowering two weeks earlier. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Early Lennei’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Early’

‘Early Lennei’

Sunset Western Garden Book, ed. 3, 1978, p. 334, 196.

M. ×soulangeana. See ‘Early Lenne’.

‘Early Lucky’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

Compact habit, white/pink flowers. Found by Piet Vergeldt in a shipment of ‘Red Lucky’ (an unregistered, unpublished cultivar possibly = ‘Hongjixing’) received from China.

‘Early Red’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

Per Luc De Jonge (pers. Comm. 2020), this = ‘Sweet Merlot’. See ‘Sweet Merlot’.

‘Early Rose’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 1, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

(M. campbellii × M. liliiflora). Os Blumhardt, New Zealand. Flowers rose-pink, similar to M. campbellii. Precocious.

‘Edith Bogue’

Nearing, Gard. Chron. Amer. 45: 383, 1941

M. grandiflora. Hardy form originating from Florida, raised in the garden of Edith A. Bogue, Montclair, NJ. Introduced by Harry Deverman, Clifton, NJ. Vigorous with broad, spreading habit. Leaves glossy dark green, heavy indumentum. =M. grandiflora ‘Bogue’; = M. grandiflora ‘Miss Bogue’

‘Editor Hopkins’

Magnolia 24(2) [Issue 46]: 9, 1989

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. ×vetichii ‘Peter Veitch’). Callaway (1994) notes ‘Editor Hopkins’ as the former name of Magnolia ‘Curly Head’. See ‘Curly Head’.

‘Edward A. Kehr’

RareFind Nursery catalog, p. 66, 2007

M. stellata (induced polyploid of M. stellata ‘Two Stones’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Named for his brother prior to flowering. Kehr assumed flowers would be larger than typical, but they were instead far smaller. He later described as “fast growing and totally worthless as a flowering plant” and allowed for it to be renamed. See ‘Octopus’.

‘Eileen Baines’

Magnolia 51(1) [Issue 99]: 27, 2016

M. wilsonii. Selected by Richard Baines, Scotland. Flowers larger than species (15 cm). Double form, nodding. Peak flowering in late May, followed by remontancy in July.

‘Elba’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 677, 2009

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Per conversation with Dick Figlar in 2019, this represents a plant growing near Hammond’s Bluff, AL and a local favorite of John Allen Smith, Chunchula, AL. Propagules were collected and evaluated by Dick Figlar in Pomona, NY, but deemed inferior to ‘Skylands Best’ and not intended for registration or further introduction.

‘Eldorado’

Callaway, Dorothy, J. The World of Magnolias, p. 101, 1994

M. grandiflora. Large, columnar. Selected from a specimen in El Dorado, AR. Listed in 1989 by Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA.

‘Eleanor Coates’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 697, 2009

M. ×soulangeana. Vigorous, flowers lighter in color than ‘Rustica Rubra’.

‘Eleanor May’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56: 21. 2005

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’ × M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’). Compact, flowers red-purple.

‘Elegance’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × M. stellata ‘Waterlily’). Phil Savage. Multi-tepaled, flowers pure pink.

‘Elegant Spring’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

M. ×loebneri (‘Leonard Messel’ × ‘White Rose’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected and introduced by Roy G. Klehm, Barrington, IL. To ca 5 × 3 m in 10 years. Flowers white, some soft pink inside. 24 tepals. Fragrant.

‘Eleonore Speer’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘Manchu Fan’ × ‘Vulcan’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany, 2015. Narrow, elongate winter buds. Flowers magenta-rose. Tepals crinkled along outer margin.

‘Elisa Odenwald’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 16, 1984

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid selected and introduced by Louisiana Nurseries (LA#76). Upright, flaring habit. Flowers creamy white with a touch of pink purple at the base on the outside of the three inner tepals; pure white inside.

‘Elizabeth’

News. Amer. Mag. Soc. 13(2): 21-22, 1977

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). Brooklyn Botanic Garden, NY. Flowers creamy-yellow. Tall, clean pyramidal habit. The first of the yellow hybrid magnolias to be introduced.

‘Elizabeth Variegated’

A variegated sport of ‘Elizabeth’ propagated and offered by RareFind Nursery, Jackson, New Jersey, USA ca 2014-2018. Uncertain as to stability of variegation. Unpublished name.

‘Elisabeth Holman’

Nigel Holman, Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 41: 37-8, 1988

M. campbellii. Seedling from Michael Williams selected by Nigel Holman. Gardiner (2000) lists as ‘Elizabeth Holman’, though Callaway (1994) uses this spelling. “Elisabeth” reflects proper spelling of her given name.

‘Ellen’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 16, 1984

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Selected by A. J. Fordham of the Arnold Arboretum from a group of seedlings raised from Arboretum seed in 1965. Tall, upright habit with variegated, yellow spotted leaves. Grows well in full sun. Variegation somewhat unstable, reversions common on older plants.

‘Elliptica’

Aiton, Hort. Kew 2: 251, 1789

M. grandiflora. Leaves elliptic, flowers not fully opening.

‘Elliptica-Crispa’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 78, 1916

M. grandiflora. See M. grandiflora ‘Crispa’.

‘Elongata’

Overlook Nurseries catalog 1956-1957, Crichton, Mobile, AL.

M. denudata. Flowers pure white, occasionally with faint tinge of purplish pink at the base of the tepals. Slightly larger than the type.

‘Else Frye’

Arb. Bull. Univ. Wash. 24: 43, Fig. 4, 1961

M. salicifolia. Introduced by W. B. Clarke & Co., San Jose, CA. Erect habit. Leaves elliptic-lanceolate, 7-15 cm, long, 3-6 cm wide, green above, glaucescent beneath, sparsely pubescent. Flowers large, 8-9 cm diameter, colored white with rose-purple base. 9 tepals.

‘Elvira’

Tawa-Glen Nursery website, http://www.tawaglen.co.nz/, Accessed 28 March 2020

(‘Sundance’ × ‘Vulcan’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand, 2015. Shape close to M. campbellii, suitable for hot climates. Listed in Luc De Jonge’s anthology, 2020.

‘Emma Cook’

Gossler Farms Nursery website. https://gosslerfarms.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. denudata × M. stellata ‘Waterlily’). Frank Galyon, Knoxville, TN. Upright habit when young, maturing to spreading/rounded, ca 4 × 3 m in 10 years. Flowers pale lavender-pink outside, pinkish-white inside. 9-11 tepals. Fragrant.

‘Emory’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 16, 1984

M. grandiflora. Selected at Louisiana State University Hilltop Arboretum. Columnar, dense habit, to 27 × 4 m. Leaves with heavy indumentum.

‘Emperor’

lunaplant.de nursery website. http://lunaplant.de. Accessed 10 October 2019

(‘Felix Jury’ × ‘Genie’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand, 2006. Upright tree to 5 m. Flowers dark pink, to 25 cm diameter.

‘Empire State’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 101, 1994

M. grandiflora. Selected by H. Harold Hume, Gainesville, FL, before 1969. From a plant on Long Island, NY.

‘Encore’

Magnolia 27(1) [Issue 51]: 25, 1991

M. ×loebneri (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×loebneri ‘Ballerina’). Selected by August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, 1988. Slow growing, shrubby habit. Flowers with 18-25 tepals. Buds form in multiples of 1-4 along twigs and on twig tips. Often flowers after a frost from smaller flower buds along the stems.

‘Englica’

Leroy, Cat. p. 7. 1850, Angers, France

M. grandiflora. English, large-flowered form. Comparable to and potentially synonymous with ‘Anglorum’ and/or ‘Macrantha Anglorum’, but distinct from ‘Macrantha’.

‘Eric Savill’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 16, 1984

M. sprengeri var. diva (Open-pollinated seedling of M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Flowers deep red-purple. Originated at Savill Garden, England.

‘Eric Walther’

McClintock, Notes Strybing Arb. 3: 9-10, 1965

M. campbellii Raffillii Group. Fastigiate. Flowers rose-pink, to 25 cm diameter. 12 tepals, ovate, the outermost spreading, the innermost erect, concealing cone. Blooms abundantly. Type tree in garden of Victor Reiter in San Francisco from Hyland Barnes of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada in 1949, which was propagated by layering from original plant in England.

‘Eskimo’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 15, 2000

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × M. kobus ‘Norman Gould’). Selected by Dr. August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, in 1990, introduced 1999. Flowers very light lavender; appear white from a distance.

‘Esveld Select’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide. p. 152, 2000

M. kobus. Dick van Gelderen, Boskoop, The Netherlands. Upright habit. Leaves emerge purple.

‘Eternal Flames’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

M. ×soulangeana type. Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Flowers white with dark pink stripe along center of tepal grading to dark pink base. Origin unknown.= M. ‘Purpurascens’

‘Eternal Spring’

Bunting, Plant Lovers Guide to Magnolias, p. 86, 2016

(M. laevifolia × M. maudiae). Clifford Parks, Camellia Forest Nursery, Chapel Hill, NC. Flowers white, to 8 cm diameter, 10 tepals.

‘Ethel Hillier’

Hilliers Man. of Trees and Shrubs, Ed. 2. 1973

M. campbellii. Flowers white, with a faint pink blush at the base of the outer tepal. Stated by the originator as more vigorous and hardier than other M. campbellii selections cultivated at the time of introduction.

‘Etienne Soulange-Bodin’

Gardiner, Magnolias, a Gardener’s Guide, p. 270, 2000

M. ×soulangeana. Gardiner (2000) proposed this cultivar epithet for the type clone of M. ×soulangeana, still ubiquitous in cultivation. = ‘Kew Pink Form’.

‘Evamaria’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 7(1), 1970

M. ×brooklynensis. Brooklyn Botanic Garden, 1970. Flowers with purple buds, suffused green and yellow. Type clone for M. ×brooklynensis.

‘Eveline’

Magnolia 45(1) [Issue 87]: 26-28, 2010

M. grandiflora. Broad, conical habit.

‘Evenley Gift’

Magnolia 49(2) [Issue 96]: 53, 2014

(‘Simple Pleasures’ × ‘Big Dude’). John Gallagher, Dorset, England. Flowers white, 20 cm diameter. 7 outer tepals.

‘Everblooming’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 77, 1994

M. virginiana. Introduced by Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA. Flowering over a long period of time.

‘Everblooming’

Cistus Nursery catalog, p. 69, Fall 2014

M. figo var. figo. Though this appeared in print prior to ‘Hagiwara Everblooming’, ‘Everblooming’ cannot be established for this selection as it was already established for a M. virginiana selection (above). It is widely referred to as M. figo var. skinneriana, but the cultivar instead keys out to M. figo var. figo. See ‘Hagiwara Everblooming’.

‘Excelsa’

Jacques, Jour. Soc. Imp. Centr. Hort. (France) 3: 476, 1857

M. acuminata. Cultivated in the Garden Montgeron near Villeneuve-Saint-Georges, France in 1856. Larger than typical in all dimensions. Flowers pale yellow.

‘Excelsa’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort, 41: 139, 1916

M. liliiflora. Taller and more robust than other M. liliiflora clones known to Pampanini. Likely no longer in cultivation.

‘Excelsa’

Bouche & Bouche, Blumenzucht 2: 718, 1855

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers dark crimson-red, large. Grown by Rinz of Frankfurt Am Main, Germany. Possibly = ‘Lennei’.

‘Exmouth’

John Colliton, Exmouth, England, before 1737

M. grandiflora. Fastigiate. Leaves elliptic, rusty tomentose beneath. Flowers large, occasionally with up to 20 tepals. = M. grandiflora ‘Asoniensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Exmouth Double’; = M. grandiflora ‘Exmouthia’; = M. grandiflora ‘Exoniensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Lanceolata’; = M. grandiflora ‘Lancifolia’; = M. grandiflora ‘Narrowleaf’; = M. grandiflora ‘Oxoniensis Flore Duplex’; = M. grandiflora ‘Oxoniensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Santa Cruz’; = M. grandiflora ‘Stricta’

‘Exmouth Double’

Poynter, Gard. Chron. III, 8: 223. 1890

M. grandiflora. Flowers of ‘Exmouth’ can contain up to 20 tepals, Uncertain if this was a distinct “double” form, probably synonymous. See ‘Exmouth’.

‘Exmouthia’

Robert Buist, Cat. #8, p. 48, 1844-45, Philadelphia, PA

M. grandiflora. See ‘Exmouth’.

‘Exoniensis’

Page, Page’s Prodromus p. 37. 1817, Southampton, England

M. grandiflora. See ‘Exmouth’.

‘Exotic Star’

Magnolia 43(2) [Issue 84]: 33, 2008

(M. sieboldii × M. grandiflora ‘Russet’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Overall similar to M. grandiflora (including rust-brown leaf indumentum), but flowers with orange-red stamens.

‘F55’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. stellata. White-flowered form from Japan. However, Robinson (2003) references as a pink-flowered selection with 16 tepals available from Eisenhut. “f55” was still listed on the Eisenhut website circa 2018 and described as a white-flowered form. Heerdegen and Eisenhut (2019) describe as white-flowered, with photos depicting at least 10 tepals.

‘Fairhope’

Magnolia 23(2) [Issue 44]: 4, 1988

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Magnolia Nursery, Chunchula, AL. Leaves with blunt tips.

‘Fairhope II’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 325, 1996

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Magnolia Nursery, Chunchula, AL. Leaves lanceolate, new growth with silver tint.

‘Fairy Magnolia Blush’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 68:19, 2017

Name contains a registered trademark and thus not freely available for use as a cultivar epithet (Article 31.3). Additionally, use of the word “Magnolia” prohibited (Article 21.20). See ‘MICjur01’.

‘Fairy Magnolia Cream’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 68:19, 2017

Name contains a registered trademark and thus not freely available for use as a cultivar epithet (Article 31.3). Additionally, use of the word “Magnolia” prohibited (Article 21.20). See ‘MicJur02’.

‘Fairy Magnolia White’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 68:19, 2017

Name contains a registered trademark and thus not freely available for use as a cultivar epithet (Article 31.3). Additionally, use of the word “Magnolia” prohibited (Article 21.20). See ‘MICJUR05’.

‘Famalipana’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 20 August 2018. Likely a misspelling for Magnolia tamaulipana.

‘Fancy Dancer’

M. ×loebneri. (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×loebneri ‘Ballerina’). Selected by Tom Horner, Waterford, WI, ca 1980. Raised from seed provided by Magnolia Society Seed Counter ca 1976. Broad, spreading form. Flowers white, semi-double, but not floppy. Unpublished name.

‘Fancy Dude’

Hatch, International Register of Ornamental Plant Cultivars: Woody Plants, OROC Book VIII: 8.0, p. 53, 2017

Sport or seedling of ‘Big Dude’ with golden-variegated margins. Sold at RareFind Nursery, Jackson, NJ, ca 2012.

‘Fanispan Furry’

Hatch, International Register of Ornamental Plant Cultivars: Woody Plants, OROC Book VIII: 8.0, p. 54, 2017

M. floribunda. Leaves reddish, turning brown and green over growing season.

‘Far East’

Louisiana Nurseries catalog, 1994-1996, p. 87

Pyramidal habit, pink flowers to 25 cm diameter.

‘Fasciata’

Millais, Magnolias, p. 213, 1927

M. salicifolia. Fastigiate, branches fasciated. Type tree at Tilgate, Sussex, England per photo in Millais (1927) facing p. 212 captioned: ‘var. fastigiata.’.= M. salicifolia ‘Fastigiata’

‘Fastigiata Praecox’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 3(1): 5, 1966

M. grandiflora. See ‘Praecox Fastigiata’.

‘Fastigiata’

Wada, Jap. Gard. Treas. p. 36, Hakoneya Nurseries, Numazu-Shi, Japan, circa 1925

M. kobus. A twiggy dwarf grower. Uncertain whether a truly fastigiate selection as the cultivar epithet implies. Compare M. kobus ‘Nana Compacta’, though the dates and places of origin appear to describe two different forms.

‘Fastigiata’

Hillier & Sons, Cat. Trees & Shrubs, P. 23, Autumn 1945 - Spring 1946, Winchester, England

M. campbellii. Apparently distributed as seedlings from an “erect, branched tree”. Listed as subsp. mollicomata, now considered synonymous with M. campbellii.

‘Fastigiata’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 53:25, 2002

M. salicifolia Probably = M. salicifolia ‘Fasciata’.

‘Fei Huang’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 54:13, 2003

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). Introduction from China through Holland circa 2000. Yellow buds opening cream to pale yellow. Compare ‘Elizabeth’. Presented in this article as the accepted name for the cultivar, with ‘Yellow River’ as a synonym. = M. ‘Yellow River’ .

‘Felicity’

RareFind Nursery catalog, p. 64, 2007

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Open and upright habit. Outer tepals white, inner tepals purple-pink, flowers appearing pink overall.

‘Felix Jury’

Magnolias: A Care Manual, p. 101, 1999

See ‘JURmag2’.

‘Fenicchia Hybrid’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 225, 1994

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Hybridized by Richard A. Fenicchia, Rochester, NY, 1953. Flowers reddish purple, larger than M. liliiflora. Flowering later than most M. ×soulangeana thus escaping some frost damage. More vigorous than either parent, displaying hybrid vigor. Use of “hybrid” in cultivar epithet allowed under 21.17 prior to 1995.

‘Ferdinando’

Leroy, Cat. p. 79. 1873, Angers, France

M. grandiflora. Named for Don Ferdinand.

‘Ferris Miller’

Magnolia 37(2) [Issue 72]: 4, 2002

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. See ‘Min Pyong-Gal’

‘Ferruginea’

Sims, Bot. Mag. 45: T, 1952. 1817

M. grandiflora. Leaves elliptic, obtuse, intensely ferruginous (red-brown) beneath. Hilliers Man. of Trees and Shrubs, Ed. 2, 1973 additionally describes one currently propagated, ‘erect compact habit with typical flowers. Likely, several different clones with reddish-brown indumentum, not uncommon in the species, have used this epithet. = M. grandiflora ‘Ferruginosa’

‘Ferruginea-Praecox’

Nouv. Dict. Hist. Nat. 13: 520. 1803

M. grandiflora. Flowers precocious. See M. grandiflora ‘Rotundifolia’.

‘Ferruginosa’

Mouillefert, Traite 112. 1891

M. grandiflora. See M. grandiflora ‘Ferruginea’.

‘Fertile Myrtle’

Magnolia 24(2) [Issue 46]: 10, 1989

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Exceptionally fecund seedling tree of M. acuminata raised from northern Ohio seed. Very self-fertile and used as a seed parent in many of Phil Savage’s crosses.

‘Findlay’s Form’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 184, 2000

M. sieboldii subsp. sinensis. Large, pendant flowers, with a second flush produced in late summer. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘Fiona’

Leafland nursery catalog, p. 92, 2015

M. campbellii (Open-pollinated seedling of M. campbellii). Selected by John Wills, Trelinoe, England. Flowers white and pink.

‘Fiona’

M. laevifolia. Compact, upright habit. Small star-like flowers. Selected in New Zealand, but uncertain as to introducer (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020). Unpublished name. Additionally, cannot be established since ‘Fiona’ was previously established for a campbellii-type selection. Probably = ‘Yunn Fiona’, see ‘Yunn Fiona’.

‘Fire’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

Chinese origin, though little information available. Suggested as regional form of M. sprengeri var. diva. Flowers very bright pink, even to inner tepal.

‘Fireglow’

Magnolia 22(2) [Issue 42]: 11, 1986-7

(M. cylindrica × M. denudata ‘Sawada’s Pink’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Symmetrical, upright, single trunked tree. Leaves thick, leathery. Flowers white with vivid magenta-pink lower third and stripe to tip. Six broad tepals. Flowering well before leaf emergence. M. cylindrica parent was a seedling grown from seed imported from Lu Shan Botanical Garden by G. F. Krossa, Livonia, MI.

‘Fireworks’

Magnolia 49(2) [Issue 96]: 42-46, 2014

M. officinalis var. biloba. John Kuhlman, NJ. Leaves bi-lobed, ca 45 × 12 cm, held in whorls 90 cm in diameter. Flowers dark reddish pink, 2 whorls of tepals, 6. Suspected sport.

‘First Flush’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 225, 1994

(M. campbellii × M. soulangeana ‘Amabilis’). Hybridized by Oswald Blumhardt, Whangarei, New Zealand. Named in 1982. Flowers white, flushed pink on the lower half of the outer tepals. Flowering early spring.

‘First Love’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 63: 24, 2012

M. ×brooklynensis (M. liliiflora × M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Purple flowers, similar to M. liliiflora, but the plant is more cold-hardy.

‘Fischeri’

Exotic Nursery, Chelsea, London, England, 1849

M. ×soulangeana (M. denudata × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Leaves ovate or rounded, 9-15 cm long, 13 cm wide, briefly acuminate. Flowers pale rose. Fragrance delicately perfumed. Pampanini (1916) listed as variety of M. liliiflora, but his suspected pedigree would preclude assigning to this specific epithet.= M. ‘Odoratissima’

‘F. J. Williams’

Magnolia 45(1) [Issue 87]: 26-28, 2010

(M. sargentiana × M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’). Hybridized by Philip Tregunna, England. Compare ‘Caerhays Belle’ but flowers deep purple pink to magenta-red; inside of tepals fade to pinkish-white. Early. Some distribution initially as “A.G. Hybrid” in reference to the Aucklandii Garden at Caerhays. = M. ‘Caerhays New Purple’

‘Flaming Heart’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘Big Dude’ × ‘Vulcan’). Michael Gottschalk. Flowers pale pink with dark pink base.

‘Flamingo’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 15, 1992

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Symmetrical, pyramidal tree. Dense foliage comparable to ‘Diva’. Flowers tulip-shaped, bright pink, unfading, appearing slightly before the leaves are produced.

‘Flavescens’

Bouche & Bouche, Blumenzucht 2: 716. 1855

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Floppy’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p.3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

(M. ×soulangeana × M. ×veitchii) See ‘Prince Charming’.

‘Flore Pleno’

Leroy, Cat. p. 7. 1850, Angers, France

M. grandiflora. Flowers double. Compare ‘Exmouth Double’ and ‘Exmouth’.

‘Flore Pleno’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 139, 1916

M. liliiflora. Flowers double.

‘Flore Pleno’

Wada, Jap. Gard. Treas., circa 1925, p. 36, Hakoneya Nurseries, Numazu-Shi, Japan

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Flowers “double”, 36 tepals. Affinities to ‘Kwanso’. Probably = ‘Kwanso’.

‘Flore Pleno’

Contini E Nava, catalogue, p. 11, 1900, Intra, Italy

M. stellata. Flowers double.

‘Flore Pleno’

Jaeger, Ziergehoelze 304, 1865

M. virginiana. Flowers double. Possibly = ‘Burchelliana or ‘Gordoniana’.

‘Floreplena’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 5, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. sieboldii subsp. sinensis. Flowers double, three weeks earlier than M. sinensis. This was listed as synonymous with ‘Ursula Grau’ in the previous checklist, but Heerdegen and Eisenhut (2019) list ‘Floreplena’ as a distinct selection with 36 tepals, indicating ‘Ferry Jones’ (an otherwise unpublished name) as a synonym. ‘Floreplena’ cannot be established as an epithet due to being comprised entirely of Latin after 1958 (Art 21.11).

‘Floribunda’

Loudon, Encycl. Trees & Shrubs 23, 1842

M. grandiflora. Dwarf, dense, irregular habit. Leaves small, undulate. Flowers smaller than typical but produced in abundance.

‘Florida Giant’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 101, 1994

M. grandiflora. Leaves and flowers larger than typical. Offered by Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA.

‘Florida Strain’

Louisiana Nurseries catalog, p. 87, 1994-1996

M. fraseri var. fraseri. From southernmost natural stand of the species. Per Art 21.17, must reject as not established due to use of word “strain”. Must = M. fraseri var. pyramidata. M. fraseri var. fraseri is not known to occur in Florida at time of writing.

‘Floridana’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 32: 86, 1907

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Floridiana’

Nehrling, My Garden in Florida, p. 104, 1944

M. grandiflora. Broad, dense, pyramidal habit. Leaves glossy, large, whitish beneath with blackish spots. Flowers abundantly. Maybe = ‘Floridana’, but difficult to determine without description of that plant.

‘Foliis Variegatis’

Bull. Soc. Tos., Ort, 40: 154, 1915

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Leaves white-variegated. Compare M. [acuminata var. sub]cordata ‘Folis Variegatis’ (van Geert, Cat. #71: 112. 1874). Probably = ‘Variegata’ of Ellwanger & Barry.

‘Foliis Variegatis’

van Geert, Cat. 71, p. 112, 1874, Ghent, Belgium

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Nomen nudum, as ‘Fol. var.’.

‘Foliis Variegatis’

Loudon, Encycl. Trees & Shrubs 23, 1842

M. grandiflora. Leaves white-variegated.

‘Foliis-Aurato-Variegatis’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 32: 86, 1907

M. grandiflora. Leaves variegated yellow. Compare ‘Variegata’.

‘Foliosa’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort.41: 101, 1916

M. grandiflora. Leaves very wide. Cultivated on Isola Borromeo, Italy.

‘Forrest’s Pink’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 15(2): 3, 1979

M. ×soulangeana. From a tree at Caerhays, thought to originate from seed collected by George Forrest. Sold by Treseders Nurseries circa 1976. Still commercially available. Flowers clear, purple-pink. Flowering with late season M. ×soulangeana types (e.g. ‘Grace McDade’, ‘Picture’, ‘Verbanica’). Frequently listed as a M. denudata selection, though hybridity has been long suspected with both M. sprengeri and M. ×soulangeana theorized as parents. A heptaploid (Richard Olsen and Stefan Lura, unpublished data, 2013), suggesting involvement from M. ×soulangeana. It is listed here as such, though specific parentage is still inconclusive.

‘Fragrance’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 28, 1998

M. ×gotoburgensis. Hybridized by Tor G. Nitzelius, former dendrologist at Gothenburg Botanical Garden, Sweden. Shrubby habit. Large leaves to 30 cm, whitish beneath. White flowers, comparable to M. obovata parent, but with crimson stamens similar to M. wilsonii parent.

‘Fragrant Angel’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

J. C. McDaniel selection of uncertain origin likely transferred to Roy Klehm, Barrington, IL for further evaluation. To ca 2.5 × 2 m in 10 years. White flowers, fragrant.

‘Fragrant Cloud’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 68: 169, 2017

Selected by Dan Xin, a nursery worker in China and sometimes distributed under his name (as ‘Dan Xin’ or ‘Dan Qing’). Flowers emerge reddish-pink, fading to cream and white. Sold as M. denudata cultivar by Burncoose circa 2018.

‘Fragrant Picotee’

(M. laevifolia × M. figo). Camellia Forest Nursery, Chapel Hill, NC ca 2016. Flowers cream-colored, dark rim to exterior (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020).

‘Fran Smith’

Broken Arrow Nursery website. https://www.brokenarrownursery.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

Leaves variegated cream and white. Relatively stable. Caudate leaf apices indicate M. denudata as at least one parent.

‘Francais Treques’

Magnolien und Tulpenbäume, p. 144, 2019

M. grandiflora. See ‘Trevei’.

‘Francois Joseph’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort, 41: 102, 1916

M. grandiflora. Compact, pyramidal habit. Flowers very large, abundant.

‘Frank Gladney’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 16, 1984

(M. liliiflora × M. ×veitchii). Gresham hybrid. Vigorous, upright. Flowers deep pink, creamy white inside, to 30 cm diameter with 12 broad tepals.

‘Frank’s Masterpiece’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 29, 1998

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Deep Purple Dream’ × ‘Paul Cook’). Frank Galyon, Knoxville, TN, 1997. Strong apical dominance, branches with a semi-weeping character. Flowers with outside of tepals very deep red purple, deeper and redder than ‘Deep Purple Dream’. To 28 cm diameter, 8-9 tepals, individual tepals to 13 cm × 10 cm.

‘Fransoniana’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort.32: 86, 1907

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘François Treyves’

Safro Milan Havlis website, https://www.havlis.cz/, Accessed 10 Jan 2019

See M. grandiflora ‘Trevei’

‘Free Spirit’

United States Patent PP24534, 2014

M. laevifolia. Barry E. Sligh, before 2012. Spreading or weeping habit. Flowers white, fragrant, produced in abundance, and held more or less upright.

‘Freeman’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 4(2): 30, 1967

(M. virginiana × M. grandiflora). Oliver Freeman, U.S. National Arboretum, before 1961. Closely resembles the M. grandiflora parent, but foliage slightly narrower and with less indumentum.

‘Freiburg Botanical Garden’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

M. grandiflora. Propagules from the large specimen of M. grandiflora at the Freiburg Botanical Garden. Sold by Lunaplant ca 2019. Uncertain as to characteristics differentiating from typical species.

‘Frosty Pale Purple’

Magnolia 50(2) [Issue 98]: 39-40, 2015

(M. figo var. skinneriana × M. figo var. crassipes). Bill Smith, Richmond, VA. Originated at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, Richmond, VA. Bushy, dense habit. Leaves dark green, somewhat glossy. Floriferous, flowers grey-cream in color with pale-purple cast. Flowering 3-4 weeks, ending early to mid-summer. Very fragrant. Since material carrying the name M. figo var. skinneriana in US commerce is largely not true to name (generally instead a cold-hardy form of M. figo var. figo), the identification of the seed parent of this cultivar is in question.

‘Fruit Cup’

Magnolia 37(1) [Issue 71]: 11, 2002

(M. fraseri × M. ×wieseneri). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Large white flowers. Fragrant.

‘Fukuju’

Magnolias and Their Allies, p. 225, 1998

M. ×soulangeana. Introduced by Nakamura, Japan ca early 1990’s and saw limited cultivation in Western Europe. Pink flowered. = M. ‘Nakamura 2’, = M. ‘Nakamura HO’

‘Full Eclipse’

Wayside Garden catalog, p. 13, 1990, Hodges, SC

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid selected by John Giordano (JG#25). Fast growing. To 2.5 m in two years, and over 9 m in 10 years. Columnar habit. Flowers reddish purple outside, white inside. Tepals slender, pointed, and slightly reflexed.

‘Furong Jiejie’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106], 16-19, 2020

M. sprengeri var. diva. Sport of ‘Diva’ selected by Jing Wang at Xi’an Botanical Garden in 2011. Flowers larger, more fragrant than typical.

‘Gail’s Favourite’

Magnolia 46(1) [Issue 89]:27, 2011

M. laevifolia. Glyn Church, Woodleigh Nursery, New Zealand. Compact (2 m height after 20 years). Foliage glossy black-green. Flowers larger than type. Perhaps a trade designation (See ‘GCWOOD213’), though a trademark does not appear to be claimed so may be freely available for use as a cultivar epithet.

‘Galaxy’

News. Amer. Mag. Soc. 15(1): 23, 1979

(liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × ‘Diva’). Upright, pyramidal habit. Flowers red-purple at the base. 11-12 tepals arranged in whorls of 4. Flowering late enough in spring to avoid frost.

‘Galissoniensis’

Koch, Dendrologie 1: 368. 1869

M. grandiflora. See ‘Galissonière’.

‘Galissonière’

Andre Leroy catalogue, p. 65, 1856, Angers, France

M. grandiflora. Hardy selection with pyramidal habit imported to France by Baron Galissonière between 1741 and 1749. “Galissonniere”, as accepted in earlier editions of the checklist, is likely a spelling variation. ‘Galissonière’ is accepted here to reflect currently accepted spelling. = M. grandiflora ‘Galissoniensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Galissonieri’; = M. grandiflora ‘Gallisson’; = M. grandiflora ‘Gallissoniere’; = M. grandiflora ‘La Gallissoniere’

‘Galissonière Nana’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 1, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. grandiflora. Dwarf selection from ‘Galissonière’. Listed in catalog as “Gallissoniere Nana”, though spelling adjusted here to reflect current usage.

‘Galissonieri’

Mottet in Nicholson, Dict. Prat. Hort. Jard. 3: 232, T. 35, fig. 1. 1895

M. grandiflora. See ‘Galissonière’.

‘Gallisson’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, p. 376, 1942

M. grandiflora. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See ‘Galissonière’.

‘Gallissoniere’

van Houtte, Cat. #163: 45. 1875, Ghent, Belgium.

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. See ‘Galissonière’.

‘Garnet’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 41: 61, 1988

M. ×soulangeana See ‘Pickard’s Garnet’.

‘GCWOOD213’

Plantipp website, http://plantipp.eu, Accessed Aug 1 2021

Presented as the accepted name for ‘Gail’s Favourite’ (EU 44506). RHS Plant Finder lists both epithets as accepted. = M. ‘Gail’s Favourite’

‘Genesis’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 19, 1989

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Flowers typical of the species, but stamens and seeds twice the typical size. Described but not named in Magnolia 20(2): 8, 1985. Initially thought to be tetraploid, though flow cytometry of progeny from this cultivar suggests instead diploid (Parris, 2011).

‘Genie’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 63: 14-15, 2010

(‘Sweet Valentine’ × [M. ×soulangeana ‘Sweet Simplicity’ × M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’]). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Compact, pyramidal. Flowers dark purple-red.

‘Gentle Giant’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘Atlas’ × ‘Paul Cook’). Large pale-pink flowers with darker tepal base. Tepals neatly whorled. Inner tepals relatively thin and outer tepals quite wide.

‘George Henry Kern’

Amer. Nurseryman 89 (5), 1949

(M. stellata × M. liliiflora). Carl Kern, USA, before 1947. Shrubby habit and small statue. Flowers dark pink, some remontant flowering later in season. = M. ×soulangeana ‘G. H. Kern’

‘Gere’

Magnolia 16(1) [Issue 29]: 24, 1980

M. denudata. Selected by J. C. McDaniel from a cemetery in Urbana, IL. Flowers white, appearing at same time as later M. ×soulangeana clones. Compare ‘Wada’s Japanese Clone’.

‘G. H. Kern’

Pickard, Magnolia Gardens List, p. 9, 1970, Canterbury, Kent, England

M. ×soulangeana See ‘George Henry Kern’.

‘Ghislaine’

Magnolia 53(2) [Issue 104]: 8, 2018

(‘Galaxy’ × ‘Purple Breeze’). Phillipe de Spoelberch, Belgium. Flowers large, floppy, pink. Compare to ‘Purple Breeze’ but paler and later flowering.

‘Ghost Ship’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. denudata. Late flowering, upright.

‘Gigantea’

Ellwanger & Barry, Descr, catalogue 2: 4, 1855

M. acuminata var. acuminata. More robust than type.

‘Gigantea’

Benary, Prix-Courant des Graines pour Marchands, p. 49. 1893, Erfurt, Germany

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Gill Day’

New Zealand Garden Journal, 16(1): 28, 2013

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Pegasus’ [possibly pollinated by ‘Vulcan’]). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers dark pink, grading to a pale pink or white at apex.

‘Ginter Spicy White’

Magnolia 47(2) [Issue 92]: 16-19, 2012

(M. tripetala ‘Bloomfield’ × R20-1’). Bill Smith, Richmond, VA, 2004. Registered 2012. Flowers with upright white buds ca 18 cm in length, opening to flowers ca 20 cm in diameter, with 12 tepals and a dark pink boss of stamens. Lemony-mint fragrance.

‘Giubiasco’

Magnolias in Art and Cultivation, p. 110-111, 2014

M. denudata. Representing propagules taken by Otto Eisenhut from the largest known M. denudata in cultivation in Giubiasco, Switzerland (Oozeerally et al. 2014). Other than size and potential regional suitability, uncertain as to how this cultivar differs from the type. Provisionally accepted pending an appropriate description.

‘Glabra’

Cels, Cat. Arb. p. 23. 1817, Paris, France

M. grandiflora. Leaves completely glabrous.

‘Glabra Ovata’

Baumann, catalogue. p. 26. 1842, Bollwiller & Mulhouse, France

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. Presumably with glabrous, ovate leaves.

‘Glaucoides’

Landreth, catalogue p. 35. 1831, Philadelphia, PA

M. virginiana var. australis. Large, upright.

‘Glen Saint Mary’

Orr & Furuta, Highlights of Agricultural Research 10 (3), Fall 1963, Auburn, AL

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum, but illustrated by photos. See ‘Saint Mary’.

‘Glenn’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 9(2): 13. 1973

M. acuminata. Selected by J. C. McDaniel from a tree in Rantoul, IL. Columnar. Self-incompatible, but crosses with var. subcordata and ‘Dunlap’. Reflowers in July to September.

‘Globosa’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 200, 1915

M. denudata. Flowers globe-shaped, short flowering duration.

‘Globulifera’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 217, 1915

M. ×soulangeana. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Globuliflora’.

‘Globuliflora’

Longone Nursery Cat. 75: 38. 1889, Milan, Italy

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers globose, brief duration. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Globulifera’

‘Gloriosa’

Leroy, catalogue, p. 65. 1856, Angers, France

M. grandiflora. Selected by Mr. LeBreton. Enormous, double flowers. Blooms at a very early age, as early as two years.= M. grandiflora ‘Glorious’

‘Glorious’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, p. 376, 1942

M. grandiflora. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See M. grandiflora ‘Gloriosa’.

‘Gold Crown’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 15, 1992

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × Sundance’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, 1984. Upright. Flowers deep yellow (deeper than ‘Sundance’ or ‘Elizabeth’), to 25 cm diameter, 8-9 tepals. Late-season.

‘Gold Cup’

Fairweather Gardens nursery catalog, p. 62, Fall 1999

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × Elizabeth’). Distinctive, thick, wrinkled foliage possibly due to high chromosome number. Flowers deep yellow, late-season, heavily textured, cup-shaped.

‘Gold Star’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 212, 2000

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × M. stellata ‘Rubra’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Small to medium-sized upright tree. Leaves bronze red when opening, turning green (paler beneath) as they mature. Flowers creamy yellow, starlike to 10 cm diameter. Fourteen strap-shaped tepals comparable to M. stellata.

‘Gold Strike’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 684, 2009

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Louisiana Nursery. Leaves mottled with golden-yellow variegation.

‘Golden Endeavor’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 15, 2000

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × ‘Sundance’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, 1988. Medium growth rate; ca 4 m height at 12 years of age, reaching a mature height of 6 m. Rounded, spreading habit. Flowers medium yellow with green flushed base, small, cup-shaped, to 10 cm diameter and appearing in great numbers. = M. ‘Golden Endurance’.

‘Golden Endurance’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 678, 2009

M. acuminata. Description of rounded habit with flowers medium yellow, green towards base is a close match to ‘Golden Endeavor’. ‘Golden Endeavor’ is not listed by Dirr (2009), and ‘Golden Endurance’ is not listed in other references. Likely an orthographic error. See ‘Golden Endeavor’.

‘Golden Gala’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). Apparently, an unregistered sister seedling of ‘Golden Sun’ introduced by David G. Leach, Madison, OH, and sold in the European market. Flowers yellow, tepals overlapping, precocious. Compare ‘Golden Sun’ (sister seedling), but later flowering.

‘Golden Gift’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 29, 1998

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × [acuminata × denudata]). David G. Leach Research Station of the Holden Arboretum, OH. Semi-dwarf, to 2 m in nine years. Flowers yellow, ca 11 cm in diameter, with faint green flush to the base. Six tepals. Very floriferous. Many buds produced, opening over a long period of time, providing a colorful display for up to four weeks. =M. ‘Sonnenkind’

‘Golden Girl’

Magnolia 27(1) [Issue 51]: 25, 1991

M. ×brooklynensis. August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Semi-upright. Flowers mid-season. Compare ‘Woodsman,’ except the flower is almost solid light yellow with only a vestige of purple.

‘Golden Glow’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 109, 2000

M. acuminata. Selected by Frank Galyon, Knoxville, TN, 1957 in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Propagated and potentially distributed by Iufer Nurseries, Salem, OR ca 1960s. Upright habit, golden and green flowers intermingled. Registered 1975.

‘Golden Goblet’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 29, 1998

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × [M. acuminata × M. denudata]). Introduced by David G. Leach Research Station of the Holden Arboretum, OH. Symmetrical pyramid to ca 4 m in 9 years. Flowers strongly yellow, ca 17 cm diameter, 6 tepals. Flowering ten days earlier than ‘Golden Sun’.

‘Golden Joy’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 51, 2011

M. ×brooklynensis (M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × M. ×brooklynensis). Hybridized by Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Compare ‘Yellow Bird’, but flowers larger, deeper yellow.

‘Golden Pond’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 678, 2009

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). Hybridized by Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Yellow flowers.

‘Golden Rain’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 16, 2001

(M. acuminata × M. kobus ‘Norman Gould’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Earliest leaves bronze colored. Flowers medium yellow, wide, cup shaped, 6 tepals. Flowers cascade downward.

‘Golden Sun’

Magnolia 31(1) [Issue 59]: 17-18, 1996

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). Hybridized by David G. Leach, Madison, OH. To 2.5 m in eight years from seed. Dense foliage. Flowers strong yellow with prominent green calyces, opening flat to 18 cm diameter. Six tepals. Floriferous and vigorous.

‘Golden Temple’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56: 23, 2005

M. maudiae. Peter Cave, New Zealand. Small tree, pyramidal habit. Leaves with rippled margins.

‘Goldfinch’

Magnolia 24(2) [Issue 46]: 8, 1989

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × M. denudata ‘Sawada’s Cream’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Tall, graceful single-trunked tree. Flowers light yellow, very early; some leaves show with later flowers.

‘Goldie Manual’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 15(2) [Issue 28]: 20. 1979

M. grandiflora. As nomen nudum in above publication. University of Washington Botanic Garden Accession records (239-68) describe a tree (‘Goldie Manuel’) received from Harwell Nursery, Van Buren, AR (likely the introducer), considered attractive due to the open shape of the flower. The tree died in summer 1987 due to girdling, and the selection is likely lost to cultivation.

‘Goliath’

Millais, Magnolias, p. 140, 1927

M. grandiflora. Leaves short, rounded, blunt at apex, light glossy green, smooth beneath. Flowers very large, persisting until November.

‘Gordoniana’

Sabine, Trans. Hort. Soc. London 3: 203, 1822

M. virginiana. Selected by James Gordon ca 1750-1760, Flowers double, 12-14(18) tepals. Grown by Thompson, Mile End Nursery, England in 1822. Distinct origin from ‘Burchelliana’. Compare ‘Flore Pleno’.

‘Gorgeous’

Magnolia 38(1) [Issue 73]: 6, 2003

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. sargentiana). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. To ca 2 × 1.5 m in 10 years. Flowers soft to deep pink with a cream-colored base. Comparable to pollen parent, but hardier.

‘Grace McDade’

Morton Arb. Bull. 30: 20, 1955

M. ×soulangeana. Introduced 1945. Per McDaniel (1978), apparently a ‘Lennei’ seedling originating in a Mobile, AL area nursery. Flowers very large, to 23 cm diameter. Tepals ovate, colored white with a rose-pink outer base.

‘Gracilis’

Salisbury, Parad. Lond. p. 87, 1807

M. liliiflora. Small shrub, branches slender. Leaves narrow. Flowers deep purple, small.

‘Grandiflora’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide. p. 184. 2000

M. sieboldii subsp. sinensis. “Similar to M. sieboldii subsp. sinensis ‘Findlay’s Form and is found in several southwest English gardens”. Not established as the epithet is comprised entirely of Latin after 1958 (Article 21.11).

‘Grandiflora’

Madlinger, Bull. W. C. Paul Arboretum 1. 1960, Memphis, Tennessee, USA

M. virginiana. Large-leaved. Probably intended as ‘Grandifolia’. Not established as the epithet is comprised entirely of Latin after 1 January 1959 (Article 21.11).

‘Grandifolia’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: T. 8 opposite p. 60 and p. 102. 1916

M. grandiflora. Columnar; branches persistent at base of trunk and often rooting. Large leaves, ca 30 × 12 cm.

‘Grandis’

Bouche & Bouche, Blumenzucht 2: 719, 1855

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers white, flushed red-purple along midrib beneath especially towards the base. 9 tepals. Callaway (1994) treated as M. ×soulangeana, though was listed as M. denudata in early catalogs.

‘Grandview’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 77, 1994

M. virginiana var. virginiana. Introduced by Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA. Leaves and flowers larger than typical.

‘Grant David’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(‘Apollo’ × ‘Vulcan’). Selected by Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers red-purple outside, pure white inside.

‘Grape Expectations’

Magnolia 47(1) [Issue 91]: 41-49, 2012

M. salicifolia. Selected by Charles Tubesing, Holden Arboretum, Mentor, OH ca 2009. First offered commercially by Gossler Farms Nursery, Springfield, OR in 2016. Flowers fragrant, with “grape soda” odor similar to Staphylea bumalda, but more intense.

‘Grayswood’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018.

M. ×loebneri. Photos on Piet Vergeldt Nursery website (magnoliastore.com) depict typical loebneri with low tepal count.

‘Green Bee’

Magnolia 38(2) [Issue 74]: 28, 2003

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × ‘Gold Crown’). August Kehr hybrid from 1991, selected by Philippe de Spoelberch and Koen Camelbeke of Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium, 2002. Upright, pyramidal habit. Flowers 9-11 cm in height, with three papery, pale green sepaloid tepals, inner tepals yellow with a greenish midrib, and outer tepals deep yellow. Flowering just before or with emergence of first leaves.

‘Green Beret’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 679, 2009

M. acuminata. Listed as sister seedling of Louisiana Nursery’s “Yellow-Green No 1”.

‘Green Diamond’

Not published. Appears to be trade designation for ‘Lv Xing’.

‘Green Giant’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 23, 1994

M. grandiflora. Selected by Westervelt Tree Company, Selma, AL, 1986. Robust, dense habit. Leaves with minimal pubescence to lower surface. Plant appeared in 1992-1993 Westervelt Tree Company catalog as Westervelt’s No. 6 and first became available in their 1994 catalog.

‘Green Mist’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. ×loebneri. Selected by Duncan and Davies, New Zealand. Flowers somewhat green-tinged when emerging from bud, fading to white.

‘Green Shadow’

Magnolia 44(1) [Issue 85]: 10, 2009

M. virginiana var. australis. Apparently, an alternate name for Mr. Shadow’s M. virginiana selection. In use by RareFind Nursery in their 2016 catalog. ‘Greenbay’ has priority by at least a year. See ‘Greenbay’.

‘Green Snow’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 16-17, 2001

([M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’] × ‘Elizabeth’). Kehr hybrid selected by Philippe de Spoelberch of Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium, 2001. Flowers floppy, with 8-9 tepals ca 20 cm. Outer tepals white, spotted green, middle tepals pale white cream, inner tepals white with a purple stripe. Flowering later than sister seedling ‘Banana Split’, just before emergence of leaves.

‘Green Star’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 159, 1994

M. stellata. Frank Galyon, Knoxville, TN. Selected from a tree on the University of Tennessee – Knoxville Campus ca 1962. Flowers with a thin green stripe to the tepal base when first opening, maturing to pure white.

‘Greenbay’

Fairweather Gardens nursery catalog, p. 59, Spring 2008

M. virginiana var. australis. Selected by Don Shadow from batch of seedlings received from J. C. McDaniel. Holds leaves through ca -25°C temperatures. Flowers to 5 cm diameter. =M. virginiana var. australis ‘Green Shadow’.

‘Greenfinch’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 58: 16-20, 2007

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×brooklynensis). Selected by Tim Thornton, England. Flowers dark yellow with green overtones, tepals not crinkled.

‘Gresham 66-9’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018.

See ‘Darrell Dean’.

‘Gresham JG11’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018.

See ‘JG 11’.

‘Gresham’s Giant’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 708, 2009

Gresham hybrid. Vigorous. Large white flowers. Origin of this epithet is uncertain. Could be synonymous with an unnamed white-flowering Gresham hybrid (e.g. JG 11), or other named selection. Likely unresolvable without examination of material.

‘Gretel Eisenhut’

Gossler Farms Nursery website. https://gosslerfarms.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

Compare ‘Caerhays Belle’ but flowers richer pink. Listed as both ‘Greta Eisenhut’ and ‘Gretl Eisenhut’ in Rhod. with Cam. and Mag. 2000, 52; ix., though “Gretel” is the proper spelling of her given name.

‘Griffin’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 684, 2009

(M. grandiflora × M. virginiana var. australis). Eugene E. Cline, Star Route, Canton, GA, before 1965 from a tree at City Park, Griffin, GA. Compact, spreading habit. Leaves relatively small. Flower large, 12 tepals.

‘Griffon’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 58: 16-20, 2007

M. ×wieseneri. Hybridized by Tim Thornton, England. Flowers large, fragrant.

‘Guichang’

Magnolia 53(2) [Issue 104]: 10, 2018

(M. acuminata × M. sargentiana). Selected by Xi’an Botanical Garden and Palm Eco-Town Development Co, China, ca 2018. Large deciduous tree. Flowers large (15-19 cm diameter), drooping, appearing in April (Xi’an, China). 17-24 tepals. Outermost three yellow-green to orange, next three outermost orange, remaining 11-18 pink in color with darker base.

‘Guillemineau’

Magnolia 56(1) [Issue 107]: 47, 2021

M. laevifolia. James Garnett, Arboretum of Nantes, France, 2013. Smaller leaves and larger flowers compared to other selections of the species.

‘Gullmarsfjord’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

(‘Pink Surprise × ‘Coral Reef’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected by Olav Kalleberg, Norway. Leaves glossy. Flowers white with purple stripe on tepal midrib.

‘Gwavas’

Rankin, Magnolias: A Care Manual, p. 88, 1999

M. macrophylla. New Zealand. Leaves longer than type.

‘Hagiwara Everblooming’

Nurseries Caroliniana website, http://www.nurcar.com, Accessed 23 Jan 2020

M. figo var. figo. Ted Stephens, Nurseries Caroliniana, North Augusta, SC, 2007. From Mr. Hagiwara, Japan. Cream-white flowers as typical of species, but flowering throughout the season. Sold as a selection of M. figo var. skinneriana, though the cultivar keys out to M. figo var. figo. = M. figo var. figo ‘Everblooming’.

‘Halehines01’

United States Patent #PP12032P2, 1999

M. grandiflora. Selected by Terry Hines, Warren County, TN. Small, slow growing. Foliage dense.

‘Halliana’

The Garden 8: 69, 1875

M. stellata. Introduced by S. B. Parsons, Flushing, NY, before 1875 and named for George R. Hall, who imported the plant from Japan in 1862. Listed in The Garden as ‘Halleana’, but as it is named for Hall, ‘Halliana’ represents the appropriate Latinization. = M. stellata ‘Halls White’; = M. stellata ‘White Star’

‘Halliana Rubra’

J. Blaauw & Co., Lincroft, New Jersey, in Plant Buyer’s Guide, Ed. 6, p, 182. 1958

M. stellata. Nomen nudum. Listed as “Halleana Rubra”, but “Halliana” represents proper Latinization. See M. stellata ‘Rubra’.

‘Halls White’

Pickard, Magnolia Gardens, Price List, Autumn 1967, Canterbury, England

M. stellata. Nomen nudum. See M. stellata ‘Halliana’.

‘Hammarö’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Red Baron’). Flowers creamy yellow. Anders Blomqvist, from open-pollinated seed provided by Dennis Ledvina.

‘Hammarö’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. From the garden of Anders Blomqvist, Hammarö, Sweden. Seedlings or other propagules from this plant have been sold in Europe by Eisenhut, Tommy Ahnby, and others. Though a fine specimen, it lacks distinguishable characteristics and was not intended for cultivar status. Additionally, this epithet is already in use for another of Mr. Blomqvist’s selections.

‘Hammondii’

Bean, Trees & Shrubs Brit. Is. 2: 74, 1914

M. ×soulangeana. Narrow tepals.

‘Handsome Gift’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 789, Extr. Proc. p. 29, 1953

M. campbellii. Exhibited by Sir Edward Bolitho, Trengwainton, Penzance, Cornwall, England in 1953 under this name, but without a published description in the journal. McDaniel (1974a) suspected the ‘Trengwainton Pale Form’ of Treseder’s Nurseries catalog p, 1, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England was synonymous. Treseder (1978), citing a 1950 Mag and Camellia Conference Report, references a “fine pale-purple form of M. mollicomata at Trengwainton near Penzance” but does not address it by a cultivar epithet or similar name. It seems reasonable these are the same selection. A description is not required to establish this epithet since it was published prior to 1 January 1959 (Article 27.1). = M. campbellii ‘Trengwainton Pale Form’

‘Harold Epstein’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 23, 1994

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Registered by August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, 1993. Flowers semi-double. Probably from a seedling purchased by Harold Epstein. = M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii ‘Multitepaled’.

‘Harold Poole’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 16, 1984

M. grandiflora. Compact, upright, overall shrubby habit. Leaves narrow, ca 20 × 4 cm, dark green above, medium green below.

‘Hartwegus’

Sargent, Silva N. Amer. 1: 4, 1891

M. grandiflora. Narrow-leaved with curiously undulating margins. Found in N. Italy. Origins uncertain per Pampanini (1916). Probably = M. grandiflora ‘Salicifolia Hartwegii’, which in turn likely = M. grandiflora ‘Salicifolia’, in synonymy with M. grandiflora ‘Angustifolia’. See M. grandiflora ‘Angustifolia’.

‘Hartwicus’

Baumann, Cat., p. 26, 1842, Bollwiller & Mulhouse, France

Would appear to = ‘Hartwegus’, however parentage in the 1842 Bauman Catalog, per the 1994 checklist, appears to reference a Magnolia pumilia × grandiflora multi-flowered dwarf hybrid. Magnolia pumila Andrews was first described in Bot. Repos. 4:t. 226 (1802), and is now considered a synonym of Magnolia coco DC. The two species were successfully crossed by S. Christopher Early (see ‘Shirley Curry’), and it may be possible this cross was completed much earlier. However, a homonym for Magnolia pumila DC may have been in use during this time period, for example the dwarf form of Magnolia virginiana (Magnolia glauca B* pumila [sic]) listed by Nuttall in 1822 (see ‘Pumila’). If either is the case, this selection would be distinct from ‘Hartwegus’ and M. grandiflora due to parentage. I have to date been unable to locate the catalog in question in order to verify this. For Pampanini (1916), ‘Hartwicus’ is a synonym of ‘Hartwegus’, though he attributes the author to “Hort.” (of horticulture), which may not = ‘Hartwicus’ of the 1842 Baumann catalog. = M. grandiflora ‘Hartwicus-Hybrida’; = M. grandiflora ‘Harvicus’

‘Hartwicus’

Nicholson, Gard. and For., 2:532, 1889

M. grandiflora. Observed by Nicholson on holiday in Southern France and Northern Italy. A “peculiar form with narrow, wavy edged-leaves…practically identical with forms grown in continental nurseries under the name of M. angustifolia and M. salicifolia”. See M. grandiflora ‘Angustifolia’.

‘Hartwicus-Hybrida’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 103, 1916

M. grandiflora. Though for Pampanini (1916) this was a form of ‘Hartwegus’ flowering at a younger age, it seems likely this epithet instead refers to ‘Hartwicus’, the purported hybrid involving M. grandiflora (Baumann, Cat. p. 26. 1842). “Hybrida” would obviously suggest a hybrid origin. See M. ‘Hartwicus’ (the purported hybrid of Baumann, not the M. grandiflora of Nicholson).

‘Harvard Centennial’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. stellata. See ‘Centennial’.

‘Harvicus’

Bouche & Bouche, Blumenzucht 2: 716, 1855

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. Probably = ‘Hartwicus’.

‘Harwell’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 16-17, 1984

M. grandiflora. L. H. Harwell, Van Buren, AR, from a row of seedlings. Produces some leaves with their margins fused to form a hollow tube the shape of a calla lily flower. = M. grandiflora ‘Calla Leaf’.

‘Hasse’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 77, 1994

M. grandiflora. Shady Grove Nursery, Orangeburg, SC, ca 1986. Upright; tightly columnar, leaves small, glossy, dark green.

‘Hattie Carthan’

Magnolia 22(2) [Issue 42]: 11, 1986-7

M. ×brooklynensis (‘Evamaria’ × unnamed brooklynensis seedling [#209]). To ca 5 × 3 m in 12 years. Flowers yellow, striped purple with a purple base. Tepals to 12 × 8 cm. Flowering up to two weeks later than M. ×soulangeana.

‘Havener’

J. C. McDaniel, Proc. Internatl. Pl. Prop. Soc. 20: 200-202, 1970

M. virginiana var. virginiana. Selected by J. C. McDaniel in Mount Pulaski, IL, USA late 1960’s. Commercially available by Don Shadow in 1970 (potentially under the name ‘Mount Pulaski’) and distributed to Treseder’s Nurseries, Cornwall, England. Flowers with creamy-pink tinge, double (12-20 tepals) and larger than typical for northern variety (to 13 cm diameter).= M. virginiana var. virginiana ‘Mt. Pulaski’

‘Hawk’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, P. 10, circa 1973, Truro, Cornwall, England

(M. sargentiana × M. campbellii). Nigel Holman. Richly colored, iridescent.

‘HDVN Select’

M. virginiana. Unpublished name. Multiple accessions cultivated at Atlanta Botanical Garden – Gainesville, GA ca 2019 (20150716, 20151083). Likely a selection by Hanging Dog Valley Nursery, Murphy, NC (Ethan Guthrie, pers. comm., 2019).

‘Heaven Scent’

News. Amer. Mag. Soc. 15(2): 9, 1979

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid. Flowers delicate pink with lavender overtones. Tight flower bud opening to a V-shaped flower. = M. ‘Reder Than’

‘Helen’

Magnolia 50(2) [Issue 98]: 42-43, 2015

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × ‘Phil’s Masterpiece’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected by John K. Weagle, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. 7 m in height after 13 years. Flowering after peak of M. ×soulangeana. Flowers ca 24 cm in diameter, red-purple, shading to pink at the mid-section and white-pink at the tip with a white edge.

‘Helen’

Magnolia 50(2) [Issue 98]: 42-43, 2015

Though this has the same name, parentage, and source as Weagle’s Helen, it is a distinct plant raised in Sweden as opposed to Canada. Not established. ‘Helen’ was registered for Mr. Weagle’s selection, prohibiting use as an epithet for this selection. See Magnolia 51(1) [Issue 99]: 36. 2015.

‘Helen Fogg’

Magnolia 24(2) [Issue 46]: 9, 1989

M. ×veitchii (M. denudata ‘Sawada’s Cream’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Vigorous, symmetrical tree. Flowers white, lower half clean-pink.

‘Helena’

lunaplant.de website. http://www.lunaplant.de/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘Atlas’ × ‘Sunsation’). Michael Gottschalk, Germany. Narrow pyramidal habit. Flowers creamy white, over 20 cm diameter. 9 tepals, each with a red-pink midrib and base. Late season.

‘Henan’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. biondii. Likely a seed collection from Henan province with some distribution in Europe. Uncertain as to origin or differences from typical species, or if this was a clonal form as opposed to a seed distribution.

‘Hendricks Park’

Gossler Farms Nursery, Plant List, 1971, Springfield, OR

M. campbellii. Gossler Farms Nursery, Springfield, OR. Flowers deep rose, to 30 cm. From the Gick Collection, Hendricks Park, Eugene, OR.

‘Henry Blue’

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Tentative name for ‘Blue Opal’.

‘Henry Foundation’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

Open pollinated seedling from the great M. cylindrica hybrid tree at the Henry Foundation, Gladwyne, PA, itself a 1936 introduction by Mary Gibson Henry from the Lushan Botanical Garden. It is similar to M. ‘Pegasus’ and possibly its parent plant.

‘Henry Hicks’

J. C. McDaniel, Amer. Hort. Mag. 46: 234. 1967

M. virginiana var. australis. Evergreen, leaf apex pointed downwards. Flowers white, 11 tepals. Type tree at Swarthmore College in Swarthmore, PA.

‘Hensel’

Treseder, Magnolias, p. 44, 1974

M. virginiana. J. C. McDaniel, selected ca 1970 from a tree planted near Princeton, IL in 1912. Flowers large, fruit fertile with 3-5 seeds per carpal as opposed to two.

‘Het Leen’

Szkótya Szmit Nursery catalog, 2018, p. 81

Flowers pink/white.

‘Highdownensis’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 75: 159, 1950

M. wilsonii. Purported hybrid between M. sieboldii subsp. sinensis and M. wilsonii, discovered at Highdown, Sussex, England among seedlings received from Caerhays Castle, Cornwall, England, prior to 1938. The Hillier Manual of Trees and Shrubs has presented it instead as a cultivar of M. wilsonii (Armitage et al. 2014), since at least the third edition of the reference in 1973.

‘Highland Park’

Arnoldia 20: 27, 1960

M. ×soulangeana. Small tree, brownish cup-shaped flowers. Tepals ca 6 × 6 cm. Early. Pleasant fragrance.

‘Hillier Form’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. ×wieseneri. Selected by Olav Kalleberg, Norway. Excellent fragrance. Hardier than type. Imported from Hilliers in 1980’s. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘Hillier Narrow Leaf Form’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. salicifolia. Nomen nudum. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958. Additionally, there is no description.

‘Hines Form’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 686, 2009

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Hines Nursery. Wide-spreading form. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘Hohman’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

M. cylindrica. August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Potentially a hybrid. Flowers as a young plant. Upright habit.

‘Holland Red’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. liliiflora. Flowers deep reddish purple. Spicy fragrance. = M. liliiflora ‘Norway Red’

‘Holland Rose’

Bunting, Plant Lovers Guide to Magnolias, p. 110, 2016

(M. liliiflora ‘Holland Red’ × M. ×loebneri ‘White Rose’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected and introduced by Roy Klehm, Barrington, IL. Flowers striped lavender, red, purple outside, white inside. 6 tepals.

‘Hollard Form’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 60: 62, 2009

M. campbellii. Hollard Garden, Taranaki, New Zealand. Multi-tepaled. Must = ‘Bernie Hollard’. See ‘Bernie Hollard’.

‘Hollywell’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Upright columnar habit. Flowers cream pink. Fragrant. As ‘Holywell’ in Leafland nursery catalog, p. 104, 2018, Palmerston North, New Zealand.

‘Holy Grail’

Morris Arb. Bull. 14: 24, figs. 11-15. 1963

M. macrophylla. D. Todd Gresham, Santa Cruz, CA. Sepals green, tepals white, “electric blue-violet” basal ring. Sepals to 18 cm long; tepals 20 cm long, 11 cm wide. Flowers chalice-shaped.

‘Hondo’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 4(1): 3. 1967

M. kobus. At the Highland Park (Rochester, NY), considerably smaller than a nearby tree originating from Hokkaido. Has been included on previous checklists but should be excluded in future editions as it was not presented as a cultivar in the original article.

‘Honey Belle’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × M. ×loebneri ‘Ballerina’). Six tepals, pale yellow.

‘Honey Beth’

Rhod. with Cam & Mag 65: 98, 2014

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × ‘Elizabeth’). Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. From cross by August Kehr. Compare sister seedlings ‘Honey Flower’ and ‘Honey Liz’, but with paler flowers.

‘Honey Crown’

Rhod. with Cam. and Mag. 54: (i, adj. to 16), 2003

Listed in the plate adjacent to p. 16. Per Koen Camelbeke and Philippe de Spoelberch in 2020, “Honey Crown” was the name for a group of seedlings resulting from a cross of M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × ‘Gold Crown’. It does not refer to a specific cultivar. See ‘Daphne’, ‘Green Bee’, and ‘Olivia’ for published, registered cultivars resulting from this cross.

‘Honey Flower’

Magnolia 47(2) [Issue 92]: 16-19, 2012

(‘Miss Honeybee’ × ‘Elizabeth’). Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. From cross by August Kehr. Compare ‘Elizabeth’ but darker color.

‘Honey Liz’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 17, 2001

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × ‘Elizabeth’). Selected by Philippe de Spoelberch of Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. Hybridized by Dr. August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Leaves large, dark green, blistered. Flowers deep persistent yellow with some green at the base of outer tepals. 6-7 tepals, floppy.

‘Honey Tulip’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 68:10, 2017

Name is a trademark and thus not freely available for use as a cultivar epithet (Article 31.3). See ‘JURMAG5’.

‘Honey Velvet’

Magnolia 46(1) [Issue 89]: 26, 2011

M. laevifolia (Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Velvet and Cream’). Compare ‘Velvet and Cream’, but flowers more cream-colored and superior leaf retention.

‘Hong Jin’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

M. ×brooklynensis (M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × M. liliiflora ‘Hongyuanbao’). Jing Wang, China, 2014. Flowers deep reddish pink, six petaloid tepals, with inner whorl more orange-greenish in tone.

‘Hong Jinxing’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

(M. liliiflora ‘Hongyuanbao’ × foveolata). Ya-ling Wang, China, 2006. Compact, vigorous tree. Flowers deep reddish pink, nine tepals. Petioles, twigs, and buds all covered by dense, white pubescence.

‘Hong Shouxing’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

(M. liliiflora ‘Hongyuanbao’ × M. laevifolia). Ya-ling Wang, 2001. Semi-evergreen. Flowers with reddish purple base, grading to white at tepal tips. Petioles, twigs, and buds covered with brown pubescence. Very similar to and perhaps synonymous with ‘Hongxioxing’, though this plant has a different patent number, and apparently a lighter flower color.

‘Hong Yu’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

(M. denudata ‘Yu Deng’ × M. viridula). Ya-ling Wang, Xi’an Botanical Garden, China, 2000. Flowers large, to 20 cm diameter with 12-16 tepals. Tepals pale-pink to white at apex, grading to dark pink base.

‘Hongjixing’

Magnolia 52(1) [Issue 100]: 21, 2017

(M. liliiflora ‘Hongyuanbao’ × M. foveolata). Hybridized at Shenzhen Fairylake Botanical Garden, China, in 2001. Semi-evergreen shrub or small tree to 7-10 ft (2-3m). Inner tepals bright reddish pink, outer tepals slightly lighter in color. Peak flowering in April-May (Shenzen, China), with remontancy from early July to October. Non-fruiting triploid. Hardiness estimated to USDA Zone 8a, possibly 7b. Has seen distribution as ‘Rubriflora’, ‘Hong Yun’, and ‘Red Lucky’. Very similar to ‘Hong Jinxing’, and potentially synonymous, though with slightly different flower color and patent number. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Red Lucky’

‘Hong Xia’

Magnolia 56(1) [Issue 107]: 44, 2021

Tiecheng Cui, Xi’an Botanical Garden, China, before 1995. Parentage unknown, but close resemblance to M. ×soulangeana. Profuse flowering in spring followed by 3-4 remontant events with ca 10% of full bloom. Limited release in the USA and present in the collections of a few botanical gardens.

‘Hongxiaoxing’

Magnolia 52(2) [Issue 100]: 22, 2017

(M. liliiflora ‘Hongyuanbao’ × M. laevifolia). Semi-evergreen, compact. Flowers with purple-red exterior, white interior. 6-9 cm diameter. 9-10 tepals. Triploid.

‘Hongyuanbao’

Acta Phytotaxonomica Sinica 43(6), 2005

M. liliiflora. Parent of ‘Yuanbaobao’ and other recent crosses from Xi’an, China. Characteristics uncertain. Sometimes listed as selection of M. ×soulangeana, but published chromosome count of 2n=4x=76 would suggest M. liliiflora.

‘Honogi’

Parmentier, Bull. Sci. Franc. & Belg. 27: 195, 254, 336, 1896

Listed as a M. macrophylla selection that originated in Japan. The name ‘honogi’ or ‘honoki’ is Japanese for M. obovata. This is likely referencing a common name for M. obovata, not a cultivar of M. macrophylla. = M. obovata.

‘Hot Flash’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 15, 2000

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Elizabeth’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, 1992. Deep yellow flowers.

‘Hot Lips’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 23, 1994

(M. campbellii × M. sprengeri). Philippe de Spoelberch, Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. Leaves rich green, nearly oval, up to 23 cm. Petioles 3 cm long, on vigorous terminal branches. Flowers with pink tepals and a rich maroon midrib, grading to an almost entirely maroon at the tepal base.

‘Hot Pants’

Magnolia 50(2) [Issue 98]: 37-38, 2016

(M. campbellii × M. sprengeri). Philippe de Spoelberch, Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. Dome-shaped with low branching habit. Flowers 14 – 16 cm diameter. Tepals white pink inside, orchid pink outside. Sister seedling of ‘Hot Lips’, though less hardy. ‘Revolute’ was an unpublished working name prior to registration (Koen Camelbeke, pers. comm, 2019).

‘HROY’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

Outer tepals gold with lavender streaking, inner cream-yellow. Marketed as PAINTED DESERT™.

‘Hvitsten’

Magnolia 49(1) [Issue 95]: 38, 2014

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × ‘Daybreak’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected by Tommy Ahnby, Sweden. Tree to 3.5 m. Flowers pink with yellow base, reddish veins. Flowering June (Norway). Leaves somewhat glossy with a reddish cast. Original plant in the garden of Roger Hilmar Karlsen, Hvitsten, Norway.

‘Hybrid A’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. campbellii. Peter Smithers. Large pink flowers. Not established. Per Article 21.17, use of “hybrid” prohibited in cultivar epithet after 1995.

‘Hybrid B’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. campbellii. Peter Smithers. Large pink flowers. Not established. Per Article 21.17, use of “hybrid” prohibited in cultivar epithet after 1995.

‘Hybrid C’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. campbellii. Peter Smithers. Large pink flowers. Not established. Per Article 21.17, use of “hybrid” prohibited in cultivar epithet after 1995.

‘Hybrida’

Wister, Swarthmore Plant Notes 1: 57, 1943

M. ×soulangeana. Nomen nudum.

‘Ian’s Cerise’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Pegasus’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Deep pink flowers.

‘Ian’s Giant Red’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(‘Vulcan’ × ‘J. C. Williams’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand.

‘Ian’s Red’

Duncan & Davies Nurseries catalog, p. 16, 2004

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Ruby’ × ‘Vulcan’ [However, RareFind Nursery has listed as ‘Vulcan’ × ‘Burgundy’]). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Shrubby habit, large flowers to 20 cm diameter with 12 tepals, clear red, less ruby than ‘Vulcan’.

‘IBC2017’

Magnolia 53(2) [Issue 104]: 11, 2018

(M. compressa × M. foveolata). Ya-ling Wang, Xi’an Botanical Garden, China, 2001. Fragrant with long flowering duration.

‘Ice Crystal’

Safro Milan Havlis website, http://havlis.cz, 14 October 2016

M. virginiana var. australis. Havlis ca 2016. Flowers to 8-10 cm, leaves 15-20 cm length. Long flowering duration.

‘Ice Queen’

(‘Cameo’ × M. campbellii ‘Mount Pirongia’). Unpublished name. Vance Hooper, New Zealand, 2018. White flowers, classic “cup and saucer” form (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020).

‘Illini Gold’

Magnolia 46(2) [Issue 90]: 58-61, 2011

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’). Selected by Wesley Whiteside, IL, from seeds received from J. C. McDaniel. Similar to M. acuminata. Vigorous, floriferous. Flowers yellow, darker and larger compared to ‘Illini Moonlight’.

‘Illini Moonlight’

Magnolia 46(2) [Issue 90]: 58-61, 2011

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’). Selected by Wesley Whiteside, IL from seeds received from J. C. McDaniel. Similar to M. acuminata. Vigorous, floriferous. Flowers medium yellow, smaller compared to ‘Illini Gold’.

‘Ingemar’

Magnolia 47(1) [Issue 91]: 41-49, 2012

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × ‘Gold Star’). Karl Flinck, Bjuv, Sweden, from seed provided by Magnolia Society International Seed Counter. Tree to at least 10 m in height. Flowers yellow, with three sepaloid tepals (2.8 cm in length) and 6-12 petaloid tepals (8 cm in length). Compare ‘Yellow Bird’, but neater habit due to strong central leader, and flowers with more tepals.

‘Inspiration’

Cistus Nursery catalog, p. 117, Spring 2014

(M. laevifolia ‘Warm Fuzzies’ × M. ×foggii ‘Loving Memories’). Barry Sligh, Taunton Gardens and Nursery, Lyttleton, New Zealand, 1996. Upright habit, 5 m or more in height. Leaves dark green with glaucous undersides. Flowering from early to mid-spring, fragrant. Registered with IP Australia (Application Number 2016/252).

‘Insubrica’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Garnet’). Seedling from a large ‘Pickard’s Garnet’ in Parco Botanico del Gambarogno, Switzerland. Pollen parent suspected as ‘Lanarth’ based on the proximity of a large specimen and overlap in flowering time. Produced bright pink flowers as an 11-year-old seedling. Named for the Insubrian region of Europe, a current place name and permissible use of Latin (Art 21.12).

‘Iolanthe’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 17, 1984

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × ‘Mark Jury’). Felix Jury, New Zealand. Compare ‘Mark Jury’, but paler flowers.

‘Irish Spring’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website, http://www.songsparrow.com/, Accessed 12 October 2018

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. ×loebneri ‘White Rose’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected by Roy Klehm, Barrington, IL. 4-5 m × 2 m in 10 years. Light yellow flowers with hints of green. Golden-yellow fall color.

‘Isca’

Roy. Hort. Soc., Camellias & Magnolias Conf. Report, p. 102, Fig. 33, 1950

M. ×veitchii. Compare ‘Peter Veitch’, but flowers whiter, opening about one week earlier. Isca is the Roman name for Exeter, Devon, England. =M. veitchii ‘Iskia’.

‘Isenberg’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 684, 2009

M. grandiflora. From Stewartstown, PA. Hardy. Uncertain as to distinction from ‘Dauber’.

‘Isis’

lunaplant.de website. http://www.lunaplant.de/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. kobus. Selected by Nursery Prenor, Hungary. Single-stemmed, narrow habit. 6-7 m × 0.8 m.

‘Iskia’

Kruessmann, Index Tremoniensis p. 76 (1970), Dortmund Botanic Garden, Germany

M. ×veitchii. See ‘Isca’.

‘Iufer’

Magnolia 21(2) [Issue 40]: 14, 1986

(M. kobus × M. salicifolia). Pyramidal, to 5-6 m height in 30 years. Large white flowers with red-tipped stamens. Sometimes listed under the nothospecies “M. ×kewensis”, though this nothospecies was not validly published as it never received a Latin diagnosis or description. = M. salicifolia ‘Iufers Form’.

‘Iufers Form’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 5, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

See ‘Iufer’.

‘Ivan Gogic’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘Big Dude’ × ‘Atlas’). Tall tree. White-pink flowers.

‘Ivory Chalice’

Magnolia 22(2) [Issue 42]: 11, 1986-7

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). David Leach, Madison, OH. Flowers pale yellow to white, before leaves, 9 tepals,

‘Ivory Jewel’

Rhod., Cam. and Mag. 63: 24, 2012

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Big Dude’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Fastigiate, to 2-3 m height with similar spread in 10 years. Flowers blush-pink exterior, creamy yellow interior. 9 large tepals.

‘Jack Fogg’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 43: 25, 1991

M. ×foggii. Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers white, pink picotee. Per Hogan (2008), narrow pyramidal, remaining under 7 m height. Banana fragrance.

‘Jade Lamp’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

M. denudata. Chinese selection. Large flowers. Pure white flower save for three reduced outer sepaloid tepals with creamy-yellow base and green stripe to center.

‘Janaki Ammal’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 157, 1994

M. kobus. EK Janaki Ammal, before 1950. A colchicine-induced polyploid raised at the Royal Horticultural Society Garden at Wisley, England. Compare ‘Norman Gould’, but flowers opening more widely and with narrower, crinkled tepals.

‘Jane’

Morris Arb. Bull. 19: 27, fig. 3. 1968

(M. liliiflora ‘Reflorescens’ × M. stellata ‘Waterlily’). U.S. National Arboretum, USA. Flowers with erect, slender red-purple buds. Flowers with 8-10 tepals. Late season. Named for Jane Freeman, wife of Orville Freeman, the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture at time of introduction.

‘Jane Platt’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 7, 1984-85, Springfield, OR

M. stellata. Originating in the garden of Jane and John Platt, Portland, OR. Compare M. stellata ‘Rosea’, but flowers paler pink and with over twice as many tepals (20-30 tepals as compared to 8-12) .= M. stellata ‘Keiskei Flore Pleno’; = M. stellata ‘Keiskei Plena’; = M. stellata ‘Rosea F.V.’; = M. stellata ‘Rosea Jane Platt’

‘Janet’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag., 67: 153, 2016

(‘Pegasus’ × M. campbellii ‘Darjeeling’). Hand cross at Verwood (garden of John Gallagher, Dorset, England). Flowers pink, to 20 cm diameter.

‘Japanese’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 3, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. denudata See ‘Wada’s Japanese Clone’.

‘J. C. Williams’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 29, 1998

(M. sargentiana × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Philip Tregunna, England. Compare ‘Lanarth,’ subtly different flower color. = M. ‘A.G.Hybrid’

‘Jenkins’

M. laevifolia. Bobby Green, Fairhope, AL. Shrubby form, dark green foliage (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2015). Possibly = ‘Snow Angel’. See ‘Snow Angel’.

‘Jennifer Robinson’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 17-18, 2001

M. ×loebneri. Capt. Richard M. Steele. Layered canopy. Flowers pale pink to white, 25-32 tepals measuring ca 6 × 2.5 cm. Flowers opening flat, tepals curving slightly upward. Fragrance reminiscent of pansies.

‘Jermyns’

Hilliers Man. of Trees and Shrubs, Ed, 2, 1973

M. salicifolia. Slow-growing, shrubby. Leaves broader than species, conspicuously glaucous beneath. Flowers larger and later than typical.

‘Jersey Belle’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 17, 1984

(M. wilsonii × M. sinensis). Flowers to 20 cm diameter, six tepals.

‘Jiaohong No 1’

HortScience 53(4): 573-574, 2018

M. sprengeri var. diva. Selected by Luyi Ma (Beijing Forestry University) from a secondary forest in Wufeng County, Hubei Province, China in 2004. Flowers with 9-(11) tepals, maturing to a purple-red color (RHS 67B) on both sides. Was listed in HortScience as a selection of Magnolia wufengensis, which is considered a synonym of M. sprengeri var. diva per Kang and Ejder (2011).

‘Jiaolian’

HortScience 55(11): 1869-1870, 2020

M. sprengeri var. diva. Selected by Beijing Forestry University, Three Gorges University and Wufeng Boling Magnolia Development Co., Ltd. ca 2017. Flowers deep pink, resembling a lotus, comprised of 18-20(24) tepals measuring 7-9 × 4-5 cm. Propagated by grafting to M. biondii understock. Was listed in HortScience as a selection of Magnolia wufengensis, considered a synonym of M. sprengeri var. diva per Kang and Ejder (2011).

‘Jim Gardiner’

Rhod. Cam. & Mag. 69: 62, 2018

Parentage unknown, possible selection of or hybrid involving M. campbellii. Tree of unknown origin at Borde Hill, West Sussex, England. Flowers soft pink, 20 incurved tepals surrounded by ring of 8, broader tepals. Named by Eleni Stephenson Clarke in honor of Mr. Gardiner’s assistance at Borde Hill over several decades. Listed as a tentative name in the 2018 RCM Yearbook, but Jim Gardiner confirmed name in email on 8 Dec 2020.

‘Jim Wilson’

United States Patent #PP12065, 2001

M. virginiana var. australis. Earl Cully, IL. Cold hardy (to ca -35°C with no damage), resistant to wind and ice, vigorous, flowers slightly larger than typical for species, and adaptable to various soil types. Marketed as MOONGLOW®, which is often misused as the cultivar epithet.

‘JN8’

Dirr and Warren, The Tree Book, p. 501, 2019

M. virginiana var. australis. Tight, upright, compact. Marketed as EMERALD TOWER™.

‘Joe McDaniel’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 17, 1984

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid. Tulip-shaped deep purple buds open to well-formed, bowl-shaped flowers. Darkest purple flower of all the Gresham hybrids as of 1984. Some distribution under JMcD#6, LA#77, G66-3.

‘Joe McDaniel 2’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 2, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

See ‘Mary Nell’.

‘Joe’s Gift’

Piet Vergeldt BV Nursery website, http://www.magnoliastore.com, Accessed 25 Jan 2019

M. fraseri var. pyramidata. John Carlson, Gwent, Wales, 2001. Flowers light yellow; deep yellow during cool springs. Fragrance of coconut and lemon.

‘Johjon’

Jef van Meulder, Arboretum Bokrijk, Genk, Belgium. Referable to M. kobus, though flowers colored pink as ‘Leonard Messel’ (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020). Uncertain as to extent of distribution.

‘John Bond’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 18, 2001

M. cylindrica. Flowers pure white, ca 23 cm diameter. Cup-and-saucer shaped flowers. Originated at Savill Gardens, England.

‘John Congreve’

Pan-Global Plants website, http://www.panglobalplants.com/, Accessed 8 January 2019

(M. sargentiana × M. sprengeri). Selected from Mount Congreve Estate (Southeastern Ireland). Flowers purple, flowering late season. Comparable to M. sprengeri var. diva in color and shape, but turned slightly outwards, showing some influence from M. sargentiana.

‘John Gallagher’

Magnolias in Art and Cultivation, p. 62, 2014

M. campbellii. Arthur George (Hydon Nurseries, Surrey, England) from seed from Lloyd Botanic Garden (Darjeeling, India). Color and form distinct from other M. campbellii selections, though uncertain as to specifics.

‘Jolana’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘Atlas’ × ‘Cedullo’). Michael Gottschalk, Germany. Undulating leaf margins.

‘Joli Pompon’

Burncoose Nurseries website. http://www.burncoose.co.uk. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(‘David Clulow’ × M. sprengeri var. sprengeri). Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. Flowers white, stamens rose-pink. to 5m × 4m.

‘Jolly Friar Tuck’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 12(1): 26-27, 1976

M. liliiflora. Flowers reddish purple outside, white inside. Fragrance of fresh-cut watermelon.

‘Jolly Roger’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 707, 2009

(M. sargentiana ‘Blood Moon’ × M. denudata). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers white flushed pink. Sister seedling of M. ‘Marjory Gossler’.

‘Jon Jon’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 219, 1994

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid selected by John Allen Smith, Magnolia Nursery, Chunchula, AL, and raised at Gloster Arboretum, Gloster, MS. Flowers comprised of tepals measuring 14-15 cm in length, colored deep reddish purple at the base, becoming lighter toward the tip. Some distribution as JG#3.

‘Joris’

Magnolia 45(1) [Issue 87]: 26-28, 2010

M. ×soulangeana. Spontaneous seedling, flowering earlier than typical M. ×soulangeana, but flowers frost tolerant.

‘Josephine’

Magnolia 22(2) [Issue 42]: 11, 1986-7

M. grandiflora. Strongly upright, pyramidal tree. Leaves with dense indumentum to lower surface. Flowers smaller than typical, ca 5-7 cm diameter, but flowering profusely.

‘Joy Bells’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

M. ×brooklynensis (M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × M. brooklynensis). Introduced by Ian Baldick, New Zealand.

‘Jubilee’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 684, 2009

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Tom Dodd, Semmes, AL. Dirr (2009) describes flowers as “excellent” but does not specify difference from type. Provisionally accepted pending more detailed description.

‘Judy’

Dudley & Kosar, Morris Arb. Bull. 19: 28, 1968

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. stellata ‘Rosea’). U.S. National Arboretum Introduction. Flowers from erect, red-purple buds, tepals keeled and flaring, inside creamy-white. Sterile triploid. U.S. Natl. Arb. #28345. Named for Judy de Vos.

‘Judy Zuk’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

(M. acuminata × [M. acuminata × {M. liliiflora × M. stellata}). Hybridized 1980 at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden’s Kitchawan Field Station. Flowers golden-yellow with yellow-orange outer surface, appearing prior to or with leaves, one week earlier than M. ‘Elizabeth’. Three Brooklyn Botanical Garden cross numbers including two unnamed seedlings are often cited with this cultivar’s parentage. Per Wayken Shaw (pers. comm., 2021): BBG #477 = unnamed seedling of M. liliiflora × M. stellata; BBG #491 = unnamed seedling of M. acuminata × BBG #477; BBG #1164 = ‘Judy Zuk’ (M. acuminata × BBG #491). The cultivar epithet honors Judith D. Zuk, Director of the Brooklyn Botanical Garden from 1990-2005.

‘Julian Hill’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 17, 1984

M. macrophylla. Polly Hill, West Tisbury, MA. Leaves and flowers typical of the species. Hardy and highly fertile.

‘JURmag1’

United States Patent Application #20040133956, 2004

(‘Vulcan’ × ‘Iolanthe’). Hybridized 1986 by Mark Jury, North Taranaki, New Zealand. Flowers dark plum, upright. Flowering at a young age. “Black Tulip” is printed as a cultivar epithet within the application, though the title of the application is ‘JURmag1’ = M. ‘Black Tulip’. Marketed as BLACK TULIP™.

‘JURmag2’

United States Patent Application #20040133955, 2004

(‘Atlas’ × ‘Vulcan’). Hybridized 1986 by Mark Jury, North Taranaki, New Zealand. Upright, flowering when young, fragrant. Heavy fruit and seed set. Jury refers to the selection as M. ‘Felix’ throughout the patent application, though the title of the application is for ‘JURmag2’. “Felix” and “Felix Jury” are generally used as trade designations. “Meganolia” was an additional trade designation used in Germany ca 2019. = M. ‘Felix Jury’. Marketed as FELIX® and FELIX JURY.

‘JURmag4’

United States Patent #PP20346, 2009

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × ‘Vulcan’). Hybridized 1993 by Mark Jury, North Taranaki, New Zealand. Upright habit. Flowers profuse, star-shaped, with dark pink tepals. = M. ‘Burgundy Star’. Marketed as BURGUNDY STAR™.

‘JURMAG5’

United States Patent #PP26685, 2016

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × ‘Iolanthe’). Hybridized 1993 by Mark Jury, North Taranaki, New Zealand. Large yellow-orange flowers, rounded tepals. Compact, slow growing.= M. ‘Honey Tulip’. Marketed as HONEY TULIP™.

‘Just Jean’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 41: 31, 1988

M. ×soulangeana. John Gallagher, Dorset, England. Chance seedling found in Dorset, England, during the 1970s. Compact. Leaves distinctly, large, obovate. Flowers clear pink, goblet-shaped, flushed deep pink at the base.

‘Kaira’

Leafland nursery catalog, p. 94, 2015

Deryk Lawrence, New Zealand. Compact, upright. Flowers pale pink.

‘Kalmthout’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018.

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Kewensis’). From Arboretum Kalmthout, Belgium. Flowers white, no further information.

‘Kansas City’

Magnolia 41(2) [Issue 79]: 8-27, 2006

M. grandiflora. Grown from cuttings taken from the champion Greater Kansas City, USA southern magnolia.

‘Karin’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘Pegasus’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’). Hybridized by Magaki (Japan). Raised by Tore Widefalk, Tidö-Lindö in Lake Mälaren, Sweden. Hardy. Flowers nearly pure white with a faint dark pink stripe and base to the inner tepals.

‘Karl Flinck’

Magnolia 24(2) [Issue 46]: 9, 1989

(M. virginiana × M. macrophylla). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers with purple blotch on inner tepals. Intermediate between parents. Vigorous, hardy.

‘Kate Brook’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018.

M. ×soulangeana. Selected by Greg Williams and Sue Milliken (Kate Brook Nursery) from a witches’-broom near Rhinebeck, NY. Compact form, dense short internodes. Flowers typical of M. ×soulangeana. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Milliken’

‘Kathariniana’

Bedelian, Gard. Chron. III, 42: 390, 1907

M. grandiflora. Leaves short, ca 18 × 10 cm. Cultivated in the Nikita Botanic Garden near Yalta in The Crimea.

‘Katie-O Early’

United States Patent Application #20030145358, 2003

(M. insignis × M. virginiana var. australis). Hybridized by S. Christopher Early, Atlanta, GA. Pink flowers. Semi-evergreen to evergreen.

‘Katja Landner’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘J. C. Williams’ × ‘Purple Planets’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Bright pink-purple flowers. Expected height of 5-7 m.

‘Kay Parris’

RareFind Nursery catalog, p. 66, 2007

M. grandiflora (Open-pollinated seedling of M. grandiflora ‘Little Gem’). Kevin Parris, Spartanburg, SC. Leaves narrow, wavy; heavy brown indumentum on lower surface. Flowers at a young age, and throughout the season.

‘Keiskei Flore Pleno’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 54:45, 2003

M. stellata. Listed in Duchy of Cornwall nurseries “some years ago” per Robinson (2003). See ‘Jane Platt’.

‘Keiskei’

Makino, Bot. Mag. Tokyo 26: 82. 1912

M. stellata. Shrubby; branches denser than the type. Flowers purple outside, deeper and smaller than the type. Cultivated in Japan. Compare M. stellata ‘Rubra’.

‘Keiskei Plena’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. stellata. Compare ‘Keiskei’, but higher tepal count. Robinson (2003) lists a ‘Keiskei Flore Pleno’ as a synonym of ‘Jane Platt’. This is likely the same plant. See ‘Jane Platt’.

‘Keith Parris’

(M. foveolata ‘Shibamichi’ × M. laevifolia ‘Gail’s Favourite’). From a 2010 cross. Some distribution as “Dozen Eggs Magnolia”, but per conversation with Dr. Parris in 2020, ‘Keith Parris’ is the chosen cultivar epithet. Unpublished name, characteristics uncertain.

‘Kevin Hughes’

Rhod. Cam. & Mag. 68: 153-154, 2017

(‘Pegasus’ × M. campbellii ‘Darjeeling’). John Gallagher, Dorset, England. Pink flowers.

‘Kew Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, circa 1973, p. 8, Truro, Cornwall, England

See ‘Kewensis’.

‘Kew No 40’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 93: 237. 1968

M. campbellii. Vigorous, flowers large, pale purple. Cultivated at Kew, England.

‘Kew No W. 4’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 93: 237; fig. 118, 1968

M. campbellii. Flowers deep rose-pink outside, pale pink inside. Cultivated at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Surrey, England.

‘Kew No W. 5’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 93: 237, 1968

M. campbellii. Flowers bright pink. Cultivated at Kew, England.

‘Kew Pink Form’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, circa 1973, p. 11, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. ×soulangeana. Tepals broader than type. Probably the original Soulange-Bodin clone of 1826. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958. See ‘Etienne Soulange-Bodin’.

‘Kew’s Surprise’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 92: 235. 1967

M. campbellii Raffillii Group. Flowers large, rich pink. 12 tepals.

‘Kewensis’

The Gardeners’ Chronicle & Agricultural Gazette III, 132: 154. 1952

Chance seedling between M. kobus and M. salicifolia occurring at RBG Kew Gardens in 1938, referred to as the nothospecies Magnolia ×kewensis. Rankin (1999) lists as M. ×kewensis ‘Kew Clone’, whereas Gardiner (2000) presents as M. ×kewensis ‘Kewensis’. However, as Magnolia ×kewensis appeared in print without an accompanying Latin description, it cannot be considered a valid nothospecies per the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature (ICBN). Therefore, this nothospecies is better reclassified as a cultivar, and clonal material tracing to the original Kew tree can be more simply presented as Magnolia ‘Kewensis’ per Article 21.5.= M. ‘Kew Clone’

‘Kieran’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(‘J. C. Williams’ × ‘Vulcan’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand.

‘Kiki’s Broom’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery catalog, p. 55, 2015

M. ×soulangeana. Greg Williams. Compact. To 1 m height and twice the spread in two years.

‘Kikuzaki’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 18, 1988-89, Springfield, Oregon

M. stellata. A tree at the U.S. National Arboretum under this name (57385-H, from Gossler Farm Nursery) exhibits white flowers with ca 30 tepals, the innermost somewhat obscuring the androecium and gynoecium until fully opening. I observed no sign of pink or purple coloration on this plant in early March 2020.

‘Killerton’

Rankin, Magnolias: A Care Manual, p. 86, 1999

M. kobus. Compact habit. Flowering at young age with flowers nearly twice the size of species.

‘Kim Kunso’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 67: 153, 2016

(M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Gresham hybrid named by Carl Ferris Miller for a staff member (Kunso Kim) at Chollipo Arboretum, later Curator of The Morton Arboretum. Flowers with tepals colored magenta on outer surface, white on inner surface. Vigorous, upright. Given the vast number of named Gresham hybrids with the parentage M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’, it is uncertain whether the pollen parent was truly ‘Lennei’ in this case, or if such was an orthographic error for ‘Lennei Alba’. The presence of magenta tepals could suggest the former, though flower color for hybrids of ‘Peter Veitch’ and ‘Lennei Alba’ can range from mostly white flowers (e.g. ‘Elisa Odenwald’) to purple flowers (e.g. ‘Joe McDaniel’).

‘King Rose’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 18, 1988-89, Springfield, Oregon

M. stellata. Flowers light pink, multi-tepalled. = M. stellata ‘King Rosea’; = M. stellata ‘Rose King’.

‘King Rosea’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. stellata. See ‘King Rose’.

‘Kingsville Fastigiate’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 4 (2): 1, 1967

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. Probably = ‘Praecox Fastigiata’.

‘Kinju’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

M. acuminata. Flower buds larger than species.

‘Klassen’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 9(2): 13, 1973

M. acuminata. Selected by J. C. McDaniel, Urbana, IL from a fast-growing 30-year-old tree in Urbana, IL. Large flowers, dark fall color. Fairly typical habit. Highly self-compatible.

‘KLMUU’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(‘Toro’ × ‘Daybreak’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected by Roy Klehm, Barrington, IL. To ca 3 × 2 m in 10 years. Flowers rose-pink outside, white with rose blush inside. 8-9 tepals. Fragrant.

‘KLMVV’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com/. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected by Roy Klehm, Barrington, IL. Flowers cream, inner tepals shaded pink, outer tepals shaded green. To ca 4 × 2 m in 10 years. Marketed as RASPBERRY GLOW™.

‘KLMWW’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

M. stellata (Open-pollinated seedling of M. stellata ‘Jane Platt’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected by Roy Klehm, Barrington, IL. To ca 3 × 2 m in 10 years. Flowers rose-pink outside, ivory to light pink inside. 14-18 tepals. Marketed as JAZZY JANE™.

‘KLMXX’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com/. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

M. stellata (Open-pollinated seedling of M. stellata ‘Jane Platt’). Tepals twisted. Hardy to USDA Zones 4-8. Marketed as CRAZY LADY™.

‘Koban Dori’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 1, 1989

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Nakamura, Japan. Small, upright, pyramidal to 6 × 4 m. Leaves rounded. Flowers upright, soft yellow, to 10 cm diameter. Six tepals. Flowering with emerging leaves.

‘Koeler’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 81, 1994

M. tripetala. Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA. Pyramidal, vigorous.

‘Kohankie’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 17, 1988-89, Springfield, Oregon [as ‘Kochanakee’]

M. salicifolia. Another larger flowered salicifolia similar to ‘W. B. Clarke’. Listed as ‘Kochanakee’, a spelling error for Henry Kohankie & Son Nursery, Painesville, Ohio, USA.

‘Kronos’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018.

(‘Atlas’ × ‘Big Dude’). Michael Gottschalk, Germany. Flowers white and light pink. Fragrant.

‘Kubushimodoki’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 52, 2011

A vernacular name referencing Magnolia pseudokobus, here considered a cultivar. See ‘Pseudokobus’.

‘Kunming’

Magnolien und Tulpenbäume, p. 177, 2019

M. laevifolia. Flowers creamy-white.

‘Kwanso’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide. p. 181. 2000

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Per Benjamin Blackburn, Willowwood Arboretum, Gladstone, NJ: “The established Japanese name for the more or less double-flowered form”. Kalleberg (1989) referred to it as impossible to find, with little information available from Japanese botanic gardens. Per Gardiner (2000), this is a fully double-form, up to 36 tepals. = M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii ‘Flore Pleno’

‘La Gallissoniere’

Vilmorin, Le Bon Jard. 1860: 1244, 1860

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. See ‘Galissonière’

‘La Maillardiere’

A. D. in Rev. Hort. III, 3: 384-394. 1849, and Ann. Res. Soc. Nantaise Hort. 1849

M. grandiflora. See ‘Maillardiere’.

‘La Mayerdiere’

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. See ‘Maillardiere’.

‘Lacey’

Wister, Swarthmore Plant Notes, Ed. 3, 1 (1): 83. 1955-56

M. denudata. Flowers white with pink spot and pink stripe on outside base of tepals. Much larger than the type, to 20 cm diameter. Original plant from France, grown on Lacey estate in central Louisiana.

‘Lady Irene Congreve’

M. campbellii. From open pollinated seed of M. campbellii at Mount Congreve at Kilmacurragh, Waterford, Southern Ireland. Buds deep pink, opening to rose-pink flowers with 12 tepals. Flowers large, 25-33 cm diameter (Jim Gardiner, pers. comm., 2019).

‘Lady Wakehurst’

Langford, Check List of the Cultivated Magnolias, 1994, p. 61

M. wilsonii. Not published. Nomen nudum with no reference to earlier description.

‘Lady Woodsman’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Pink Surprise’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected and introduced by Roy G. Klehm, Barrington, IL. To 5 × 3 m in 10 years. Flowers greenish cream with lavender, pink and ivory blends. Slightly fragrant.

‘Lady of the Night’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook 2013, p. 51

M. figo var. figo. Cream-flowered selection, height to 6 m.

‘Lagniappe’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 709, 2009

Gresham hybrid introduced by Bill Dodd, AL. Flowers purple outside, white inside. Tepals notched.

‘Lakeside’

Magnolia Nursery, Fall ‘90 - Spring ‘91

M. grandiflora. Large, wavy leaves. Extremely fast growing.

‘Lakeside Park’

M. grandiflora. Hardy tree cultivated in Cincinnati, OH, which has been propagated and distributed to a limited extent, primarily in the early 2000’s.

‘Lamellen’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018.

M. campbellii. Listed as a superb form distinct from original Cornish M. campbellii. Uncertain as to characteristics differentiating from other M. campbellii cultivars.

‘Lamp’

Magnolia 56(1) [Issue 107]: 44, 2021

M. denudata. Tiecheng Cui, Xi’an Botanical Garden, China, before 1995. Compare ‘Banana’, but flowers instead lamp-shaped. Limited release in the USA and present in the collections of a few botanical gardens.

‘Lanarth’

M. P. Williams, Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 72: 290, 1947

M. campbellii. Fastigiate. Leaves broader, thicker, more wrinkled than type, ca 24 × 15 cm. Flowers purple, 12 tepals, ca 11 × 6 cm. Originally regarded as belonging to M. campbellii subsp. mollicomata, now generally considered synonymous with M. campbellii.

‘Lanarth’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 2, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. dawsoniana. Grown by M. P. Williams, Lanarth, St. Keverne, Cornwall, England. Flowers lilac purple from bud, turning paler as they develop, ultimately becoming white with lavender shading. Per Charles Williams, was likely deceased by 2019. This is a distinct clone of M. dawsoniana not to be confused with M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’. Not established as the M. campbellii selection has priority.

‘Lanarth Surprise’

Magnolia 51(1) [Issue 99]: 28, 2016

M. campbellii. Selected by Philip Tregunna. Vigorous plant to ca 7 m in forty years. Flowers small, magenta colored. Shaped as in ‘Lanarth’ and with a hint of red as they open. Sparse flowerer when establishing, though becoming more floriferous with maturity. Registered as belonging to M. campbellii subsp. mollicomata, though this subspecies is now generally considered synonymous with M. campbellii.

‘Lanceolata’

Aiton, Hort. Kew. 2: 251, 1789

M. grandiflora. Leaves lanceolate with bent apex, flowers subcontracted. Per Sims, Bot. Mag. 45: T. 1952 (1817), = ‘Exmouth’. See ‘Exmouth’.

‘Lancifolia’

Piccioli, Auct. Cat. PL. Hort. Bot. Mus. Florentini p. 5, 1824

M. grandiflora See ‘Exmouth’.

‘Landicla’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, circa 1973, p. 3, Truro, Cornwall, England.

M. campbellii. Flowers large, cup-and-saucer form, deep purple pink.

‘Lanhydrock’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 15, 1992

M. sprengeri var. diva (open-pollinated seedling of ‘Diva’). David Clulow, Surrey, England, 1989. Deeper flower color than ‘Diva’. Flowered at 11 years from seed. Originated at Trewithen in 1969.

‘Lanhydrock Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 1, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. acuminata. Free-flowering.

‘Large Flowered Strain’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 704, 2009

M. virginiana. Introduced by Louisiana Nurseries. Flowers to 15 cm diameter. Per Article 21.17, must reject as not established due to use of word “strain”.

‘Large Yellow’

Rankin, Magnolias: A Care Manual, p. 76, 1999

M. acuminata. Introduced by Louisiana Nursery, USA. Flowers pale yellow, large.

‘Laser’

Magnolia 27(1) [Issue 51]: 25, 1991

M. acuminata var. acuminata (Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Fertile Myrtle’; colchicine induced polyploid). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. 16-ploid (304 chromosomes). Larger leaves than M. acuminata and thicker twigs than ‘Fertile Myrtle’ or ‘Patriot’.

‘Late Clone’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 81, 1994

M. denudata. Later flowering than the type. Listed by Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA.

‘Late Form’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018.

M. denudata. Flowers white. Presumably late-flowering. No description on Piet Vergeldt Nursery website (magnoliastore.com). Not established. The word “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets after 1958 (Art 21.16).

‘Late Pink’

McClintock, Jour. Calif. Hort. Soc. 23: 34-35, 1962

M. campbellii. Flowers pink. Flowers and leaves consistently appearing later than type (Early March as opposed to mid-Feb in San Franscisco, CA, USA). ‘Aequinoctialis’ (or ‘Equinoctialis’) was an unpublished, unregistered name in use prior to registration of ‘Late Pink’.

‘Late Soulangeana’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 206, 1994

M. ×soulangeana. Similar in every way to ‘Lilliputian’. Supposedly came from England. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Speciosa’.

‘Latifolia’

Aiton, Hort. Kew 2: 251, 1789

M. virginiana. Nomen nudum.

‘Latifolia’

Loudon, Arb. Frut. Brit. 1: 262. 1838; Nicholson, The Garden 24: 512, 1883

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum; cultivated by Baumann, Cat. p. 26, 1842, Bollwiller & Mulhouse, France.

‘Laura’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

See ‘Laura Saylor’.

‘Laura Saylor’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 15, 1992

(M. denudata ‘Sawada’s Pink’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI, 1976. Tall, erect tree. Flowers large, upright. Bright pink outside, white shaded with pink inside. 9-12 tepals. Leaves comparable to ‘Diva’, but ca 75% the size = M. ‘Laura’

‘Laurifolia’

A. & E. Kay, Pl World Florida. 33, 1933

M. grandiflora. Pyramidal, dense. Leaves small, to 13 cm in length. Flowers small, to 15 cm diameter. Floriferous.

‘Lausanne’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. sargentiana. Flink Norge. Flowers huge, rose-pink.

‘Lavender Delight’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘First Love’ × ‘Daybreak’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers generally pink though some yellow to innermost tepals or tepal insides. Compare ‘Daybreak’. Hardy and late flowering.

‘Lavender Princess’

lunaplant.de website. http://www.lunaplant.de/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. ×soulangeana. Dwarf, to 3 m height and similar spread.

‘Lavender Star’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

([M. liliiflora ‘O’Neill’ × M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’] × ‘Gorgeous’?). Hybridized by Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Dense, compact. Flowers with six tepals, dark pink exterior and white interior. Song Sparrow citation listed ‘O’Neill’, ‘Woodsman’, and ‘Gorgeous’ as parents. I suspect one parent is an unnamed ‘O’Neill’ × ‘Woodsman’ cross and the other ‘Gorgeous’ based on the age of those selections, as ‘Gorgeous’ is a more recent introduction.

‘Leach Rosea’

M. kobus. Sold by Beaver Creek Nursery, Barrington, Illinois, USA ca 2005. Possibly a pink-flowered M. kobus originating at the David G. Leach Research Station, Mentor, OH. Still occasionally in cultivation, though to date I have been unable to examine flowering specimens to clarify description.

‘Leanne’

M. grandiflora. (‘Bracken’s Brown Beauty’ × ‘Phyllis Barrow’). Tom Krenitsky, Chapel Hill, NC. Selected for indumentum and structure. Named for Leanne Kenealy, who propagated the plant ca 2019.

‘Leather Leaf’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 15, 1988-89, Springfield, Oregon

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Todd Gresham. Leaves thick, heavily textured. Flowers white.

‘Leda’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 29, 1998

(M. cylindrica × M. campbellii). Selected by Philippe de Spoelberch, Belgium. Habit comparable to M. campbellii. Flowers to 23 cm diameter, cup-and-saucer form. Believed to be same clone as previously registered under the name Magnolia ‘White Lips’. It was recommended that the epithet ‘White Lips’ be changed to ‘Leda’ to avoid further confusion. = M. ‘White Lips’

‘Ledvina’s Largess’

Magnolia 52(2) [Issue 102]: 11, 2017

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × ‘Rose Marie’). Selected by Guy Sternberg, Starhill Forest Arboretum, Petersburg, IL, from seed provided by Dennis Ledvina in 2006. Flowers dark pink, emerging two weeks later than typical M. ×soulangeana and escaping most spring frosts in the Midwestern US.

‘Legacy’

Magnolia 27(1) [Issue 51]: 26, 1991

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × M. denudata). David G. Leach, North Madison, OH. Flowers to 23 cm diameter. 8-11 tepals, red-purple at the exterior base, becoming paler at the tip. Interior white, giving the flower an overall soft pink impression. Flowering mid-late April (Ohio).

‘Legend’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 30, 1998

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). Leach Station, Ohio. Flowers yellow, deeper at base. To 24 cm diameter. Flowering before leaf emergence.

‘Lemon Fragrant’

Texture Plants website. http://textureplants.co.nz. Accessed 13 Feb 2018

(M. ×foggii ‘Bubbles’ × M. foveolata). Introduced by Texture Plants, New Zealand. Evergreen, compact habit. Large lemon-scented flowers persisting through season.

‘Lemon Star’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 22-23, 2005

(M. acuminata × M. kobus ‘Norman Gould’). Kehr hybrid selected by Koen Camelbeke and Philippe de Spoelberch of Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. Broad tree. Flowers greenish-yellow, becoming chartreuse yellow with age. Outer whorl of tepals more greenish. Three sepaloids, reduced, and six petaloid tepals. Fragrant.= M. ‘Swedish Star’.

‘Lemonade’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Jan 2019

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × unknown). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Compact, shrubby, to 3 × 2 m in 10 years. Flowers light yellow. Parentage has been listed as ‘Miss Honeybee’ × M. doltsopa, though this has been disputed by Dick Figlar (pers. comm., 2020) and others due to the lack of evident characteristics from the latter species.

‘Lena’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook, p. 203, 2015

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Caerhays Belle’). Referenced as growing at Higham Lodge Garden (Carol and Elizabeth Gurney) circa 2015. Per Jim Gardiner in 2019, a seedling of ‘Caerhays Belle’ raised by Michael Hickson and named for his wife.

‘Lennarth Jonsson’

Magnolia 37(1) [Issue 71]: 10, 2002

(M. acuminata × M. campbellii). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Characteristics uncertain. Likely similar to ‘Phil’s Masterpiece’, another Savage selection of the same parentage.

‘Lenne’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, P. 377. 1942

M. ×soulangeana. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See ‘Lennei’.

‘Lennei’

Topf, Gartenflora 1: 86, 244. 1852

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers purplish magenta, darkest of group but not as dark as M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’. Sold to Alfred Topf Nursery, Erfurt (E. Prussia), for 10,000 francs. Named in honor of Peter Joseph Lenné (1769-1866). = M. ×soulangeana ‘Lenne’.

‘Lennei Alba’

Keessen, Cat. Terra Nova p. 77. 1931

M. ×soulangeana. Spreading habit. Flowers white, large, and goblet-shaped with broadly thick tepals.

‘Lennei Early’

M. ×soulangeana. Unpublished, unregistered. See ‘Early Lenne’.

‘Lennei Hybrid’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 14(2):22, 1978

M. ×soulangeana. See ‘Lilenne’.

‘Leonard Messel’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 80: 484, fig. 104, 1955

M. ×loebneri. Grown at Nymans, Handcross, Sussex, England by Mrs. L. C. R. Messel. Flowers with bright pink-purple exterior, nearly white interior. About 12 tepals.

‘Lesley Jane’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 30, 1998

M. ×loebneri (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×loebneri ‘Leonard Messel’). Selected by John D. Carlson, Gwent, Wales. Small, single-stemmed, upright branched tree ca 3 × 2.5 m in 10 years. Flowers with red-purple exterior as they emerge, fading to white at maturity. 14-17 tepals. Flowers to 10 cm diameter. Compare ‘Leonard Messel’ (same flowering time), but paler, flowers with more tepals, and less floppy.

‘Lexington’

M. liliiflora. Powell Gardens, Kingsville, MO. Narrow tepals (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020). Uncertain as to extent of propagation or distribution.

‘Lilac Chalice’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 19, 2005

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Sweet Simplicity’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Small tree, estimated to reach 4 m height at maturity. Flowers clear lilac-purple at base, fading slightly at apex. 6 tepals, each ca 9 × 6 cm.

‘Lilenne’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 9 (4): 6, 1974

M. ×soulangeana (M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × M. lilliflora). Shrubby, similar to M. liliiflora. Flowers with a dark purple exterior, white interior, and 9 tepals, flowering later than other M. liliifora selections. Per McDaniel (1978), “Lennei Hybrid”, along with ‘Grace McDade’ and ‘Lombardy Rose’ originated as seedlings from M. ‘Lennei’ near Mobile, Alabama, US and introduced by Mobile County wholesale nurseries. Correspondence with Mr. A. Pickard indicated ‘Lilenne’ (‘Lilleny’) to be the same as the cultivar called ‘Lennei Hybrid’ in the United States at the time. ‘Lilenne’ is the earliest established name for this selection (1974) and should have priority.= M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Hybrid’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Lilleny’

‘Lileny’

Gardiner, Magnolias: a Gardener’s Guide, p. 253, 2000

See ‘Lilenne’.

‘Lili Diva’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(M. liliiflora × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Compare ‘Galaxy’ or ‘Spectrum’ but flower color more intense. Offered by lunaplant in limited quantities. Sometimes as ‘LilyDiva’. Uncertain whether this was an intended epithet or a placeholder name.

‘Lilleny’

Catalogs of Pickard, Magnolia Gardens, Canterbury, England

M. ×soulangeana. See ‘Lilenne’.

‘Lilliputian’

Semmes Nurseries catalog 1946, Semmes, Alabama

M. ×soulangeana. Miniature form, both in habit and flower size. Similar to ‘Late soulangeana’ which supposedly came from England. Sometimes misspelled ‘Liliputin’. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Small Flowered Soulangeana’.

‘Limelight’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 54:13, 2003

(M. acuminata var. subcordata × M. ×soulangeana ‘Big Pink’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Long cream-yellow flowers, green veins. Dirr (2009) lists the pedigree as “acuminata × ‘Alexandrina’”. M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexandrina Japanese Form’ was a working name for ‘Big Pink’ per de Spoelberch (2003), so perhaps this inconsistency results from nomenclatural confusion as opposed to a disputed pedigree.

‘Lina’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × M. cylindrica). Tommy Ahnby, Sweden. White flowers with red stripe to each tepal. Hardy and later flowering.

‘Lionel de Rothschild’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag., 60: 112-113, 2009

M. campbellii. Selected from a group of trees growing in Mount Congreve, Waterford, southern Ireland. Flowers dark wine-red. Named for Ambrose Congreve’s closest collaborator when developing the estate.

‘Lions Form’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. liliiflora. Flowers red-purple, tepals upright, twisted. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958. See ‘Lyons’.

‘Little Darling’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Elizabeth’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Photos on Piet Vergeldt Nursery website (magnoliastore.com) depict minute yellow flower with ca 6 wide tepals, some pink towards base.

‘Little Form’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. kobus. Nomen nudum. Photos on website depict nondescript M. ×loebneri or similar taxon. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘Little Geisha’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. liliiflora. Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Small form.

‘Little Gem’

Steed’s Nursery, Candor, North Carolina, 1966

M. grandiflora. Selected in 1952 by Warren Steed as a seedling from a local population at Candor, NC. Compact, narrow, columnar, to ca 4 × 1.5 m in 16 years. Leaves and flowers smaller than the species. Flowering more profusely later in the season.

‘Little Johnnie T.’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 685, 2009

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Hales & Hines Nursery Co., McMinnville, TN. Dwarf form.

‘Little Sue’

MrMaple nursery website, https://mrmaple.com/, Accessed 8 February 2021

(Witches’-broom of ‘Susan’). Uncertain origin. Comparable to ‘Susan’ but denser, more compact, and slower growing, projected to 1.5 m in 10 years.

‘Livingstone’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × ‘Vulcan’). Hybridized by Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Upright habit, flowers red-purple.

‘Lois’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 678, 2009

(M. acuminata × unnamed seedling #853 [‘Elizabeth’ sibling]). Lola Koerting, Brooklyn Botanic Garden, NY. Upright globe to 9 × 6 m. Flowers lemon yellow. Mid to late spring. Fragrant.

‘Lolita’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Olav Kalleberg, Norway. Dwarf with pink stamens.

‘Lombardy Rose’

Clint McDade, Semmes Nurseries catalog 1946, Semmes, AL

M. ×soulangeana (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Compare ‘Lennei’ but faster growing, freer flowering, and continuing to flower into mid-summer.

‘Longifolia Undulata’

Loudon, Encycl. Trees & Shrubs 23, 1842

M. grandiflora. Was listed as cultivated by Leroy of Angers, France. Nomen nudum. Likely = ‘Undulata’. See ‘Undulata’.

‘Longifolia’

Le Bon Jardinier 1833: 734, 1833

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum, referencing “long leaves”.

‘Lord Wakehurst’

Langford, Check List of the Cultivated Magnolias, 1994, p. 61

M. wilsonii. Not published. Nomen nudum with no reference to earlier description.

‘Lotus’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 44: 52, 1992

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × ‘Mark Jury’). Felix Jury, New Zealand. Flowers large, pure cream, tepals spatulate. Compare sister seedlings ‘Athene’ and ‘Milky Way’, but more pyramid-shaped, smaller growing, and less floriferous.

‘Louis Van Houtte’

Pucci, Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort.32: 166. 1907

M. liliiflora. Pampanini, Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort.41: 141 (1916) lists in synonymy with M. liliiflora ‘Reflorescens’.

‘Louisa Fête’

Mail Order Trees nursery website, https://www.mailordertrees.co.uk/, Accessed 8 Jan 2019

M. salicifolia. From van Gimborn Arboretum in Holland. Uncertain as to how distinguished from type. Provisionally accepted pending acceptable description.

‘Louisiana’

A. & E. Kay, Pl World Fla. 33. 1933

M. grandiflora. Selected before 1897, with the original tree still standing on the banks of the Mississippi River, near New Orleans, LA, ca 1944. Round habit. Leaves large, youngest bronze-green, mature leaves glossy dark green with a faint brownish tomentum.= M. grandiflora ‘Ludoviciana’

‘Louisiana Evergreen’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 704, 2009

M. virginiana. Compact. Flowering from spring to fall. Evergreen. Likely a seedling form. Probably = (the illegitimate) var. ludoviciana, the evergreen Texas/Louisiana haplotype of M. virginiana referable to var. australis.

‘Loving Memories’

M. ×foggii. B. E. Sligh. Flowers white, bud caps rusty brown (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020). Uncertain as to extent of propagation or distribution.

‘Lu Shan’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018. (M. denudata × M. cylindrica). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI, 1970. Upright, vigorous, small to medium size tree. This is likely in reference to the Lu Shan Botanical Garden distribution of Magnolia cylindrica (late 1960’s) grown by Gus Krossa and others into the mid 1970’s. McDaniel (1974b) theorized the resultant seedlings were hybrids with M. denudata. Likely not in reference to or intended as a particular cultivar.

‘Lucia’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

(‘Pegasus’ × M. salicifolia). Introduced by Erland Ejder and the Swedish Magnolia Group from the K. E. Flinck Magnolia Forest, Alnarp, Sweden. Flowers pure white save for faint greenish-yellow stripe. Floriferous. Mid-spring.

‘Lucille’

Magnolien und Tulpenbäume, p. 264, 2019

M. virginiana var. australis. Hardy form, narrow tepals.

‘Lucious’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018.

Photos depict pale pink flowers, outermost tepals yellow-green and reduced. Likely = Phil Savage’s ‘Luscious’, as the photos resemble some acuminata influence. See ‘Luscious’.

‘Lucy Carlson’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018.

(M. ×loebneri ‘Leonard Messel’ × M. salicifolia). John Carlson, Gwent, Wales. Upright, small leaves. Flowers deep pink in bud, fading as flowers open.

‘Ludoviciana’

Nehrling, My Garden in Fla., p. 104, 1944

M. grandiflora. A selection of M. grandiflora near New Orleans. ‘Louisiana’ has priority. See ‘Louisiana’. As a M. grandiflora selection, should be considered distinct from the illegitimate “Magnolia virginiana var. ludoviciana” sometimes applied to populations of that species within Texas and Louisiana.

‘Luminescence’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × ‘Gorgeous’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers pale yellow with pink coloration to inner tepals, especially at base. Hardy and later-flowering. Listed on lunaplant.de website as “Luminescense”, likely a spelling error.

‘Lupo Osti’

Magnolia 44(1) [Issue 85]: 18-20, 2009

M. ×wieseneri (M. ×wieseneri × M. obovata). Peter Smithers, Switzerland. Raised from an open-pollinated seedling of M. ×wieseneri, with a nearby M. obovata suspected as the pollen parent. Flowers creamy white, outer tepals ruffled, fragrance with hint of lavender.

‘Lutea’

Handb. Laubholzbenennung p. 100, 1903

M. fraseri var. pyramidata. Not representing a clonal form, though cream-colored buds have been observed on this species in cultivation in Western Europe.

‘Lv Xing’

Magnolia 52(2) [Issue 101]: 33, 2017

M. cylindrica. Small tree 2-3 m in height. Flowering late March or early April, remontancy until autumn. Flowers yellow-green in color with nine tepals. Outermost tepals with purple-red veins, grading to a purple-red base. In 2016 (possibly earlier), was sold as “Magnolia concinna ‘Sunrise’” by Thompson & Morgan, Van Meuwen, and others. However, “Sunrise” was used for this selection against the wishes of the introducer, in violation of Article 31.4 of the Cultivated Code. “Green Diamond” may be another trade name. = M. ‘Green Diamond’; = M. ‘Sunrise’

‘Lydia’

Magnolia 21(2) Issue 42]: 12, 1986-7

M. obovata. Polly Hill, West Tisbury, MA. Narrow habit, flowers with pink tinge to outer tepals. Grown from seed sent from Japan by Dr. T. Rokujo.

‘Lyle’s Legacy’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. stellata (Open-pollinated seedling of M. stellata ‘Centennial’). Paul Cappiello. Shrubby habit, ca 2.5 × 2 m in 10 years. Flowers white with soft pink center. 46 tepals. Fragrant.

‘Lyons’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 6, 1980-81, Springfield, Oregon

M. liliiflora. Similar to ‘O’Neill,’ but more ruffled. = M. liliiflora ‘Lions Form’; = M. liliiflora ‘Lyon’s form’; = M. liliiflora ‘Lyons F.’

‘Lyon’s form’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. liliiflora Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958. See ‘Lyons’.

‘Lyons F.’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. liliiflora. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958 (”F.” in this case an abbreviation for form). See ‘Lyons’.

‘Maarten’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

From a tree in Het Leen, Belgium received as ‘Forrest’s Pink’, but not true to name. This selection has flowers with bright deep pink outer tepals and white inner tepals. Per Luc De Jonge, it is a synonym of ‘Wim Rutten’. See ‘Wim Rutten’.

‘Macrantha Anglorum’

Leroy, Cat. p. 65. 1865, Angers, France

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. Likely a large-flowered form from England, distinguished from the ‘Macrantha’ at Arboretum de Segrez (Lavallee, Arb. Segrez. 6. 1877), which is instead likely of French origin.

‘Macrantha’

Lavallee, Arb. Segrez. 6. 1877

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. Large-flowered.

‘Madison’

McDaniel, Proc. Central States Forest Tree Improvement Conference 6th, p. 7, October 1968

M. grandiflora. From Madison, AL, selected in the 1950’s. Compare ‘Alabama Everblooming’, but neater growth habit.

‘Mae Sunrise’

Origin uncertain, likely Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Offered by Song Sparrow Nursery, Avalon, Wisconsin, USA ca 2012. Flowers rarely fully opening, measuring ca 12 cm diameter, and consisting of three greenish sepaloid tepals and six yellowish petaloid tepals with a pink stripe.

‘Mag’s Pirouette’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 52, 2011

M. ×loebneri (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×loebneri ‘Ballerina’). Tetsuo Magaki. Flowers small, many tepals. Outer shorter than inner. = M. ×loebneri ‘Pirouette’

‘Magardiensis’

Bosse, Vollst. Handb. Blumeng., Ed. 2, 2: 465, 1841

M. grandiflora. Probably = ‘Maillardiere’.

‘Magnolia Charm’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]:12, 2005

Ledvina (2005) provided a photo captioned ‘Magnolia Charm’ (M. officinalis × M. obovata) but provided no description in the article. Not established. Contains the name of the genus (Magnolia) in violation of Article 21.20. See ‘Oriental Charm’.

‘Magordensis’

Loudon, Encycl. Trees & Shrubs 23, 1842

M. grandiflora. From the Garden at Desio near Monza near Milan, Italy. Nomen nudum. Probably = ‘Maillardiere’.

‘Maggie Mae’

(M. sieboldii var. sieboldii ‘Colossus’ × M. grandiflora ‘Kay Parris’). Kevin Parris, Spartanburg, SC. Compact, mostly evergreen. Flowers resembling a large gardenia and with a highly diminished gynandrophore.

‘Maharaja’

Gresham, Jour. Calif. Hort. Soc. 24: 108, Fig. 6. 1963

M. campbellii. Introduced by Todd Gresham, Santa Cruz, CA. Seedling from W.B. Clarke Nursery (San Jose, California, United States). Branches ascendent, compact. Flowers white with a fuchsia-purple base, to 28 cm diameter. 12 tepals. = M. campbellii ‘Maharajah’.

‘Maharajah’

Gresham, Morris Arb. Bull. 15: 29-31. 1964

M. campbellii. See ‘Maharaja’.

‘Maharanee’

Gresham, Morris Arb. Bull. 15: 31, Fig. 43. 1964

M. campbellii. Introduced by Todd Gresham, Santa Cruz, CA. Seedling from W.B. Clarke Nursery, San Jose, CA. New leaves plum red. Flowers white, early, to 25 cm.

‘Mahogany Glow’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56: 21, 2005

(M. ×veitchii × M. liliiflora). Hybridized by Os Blumhardt, New Zealand. Similar to M. liliiflora in growth, with flowers vaguely mahogany in color.

‘Maillardiere’

Rev. Hort. III, 3: 384-394, 1849

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum; original plant from the Mississippi River valley, given to the Lord Rene Darquistade of La Maillardiere near Nantes, France, about 1711. See reprint in Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 6 (1): 3-4 (1969). = M. grandiflora ‘La Maillardiere’; = M. grandiflora ‘La Mayerdiere’; = M. grandiflora ‘Magardiensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Magordensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Majardensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Majardiaensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Majardieriensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Majordiensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Marderiensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Mayardiensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Mayardierensis’

‘Mainstreet’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 20, 1989

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Cedar Lane Farm, Madison, GA. Fastigiate.

‘Majardensis’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 104, 1916

M. grandiflora. Probably = ‘Maillardiere’.

‘Majardiaensis’

A. & E. Kay, Pl World Fla 33, 1933

M. grandiflora. Probably = ‘Maillardiere’.

‘Majardieriensis’

Nicholson, The Garden 24: 512, 1883

M. grandiflora. Probably = ‘Maillardiere’.

‘Majestica’

A. & E. Kay, Pl World Fla. 33, 1933

M. grandiflora. Conical, strong grower. Leaves large, to 38 cm length. Lower surface grayish with dark spots. Flowers also large, inclined to double.

‘Majordiensis’

Nehrling, My Garden in Fla. 103, 1944

M. grandiflora. Probably = ‘Maillardiere’.

‘Malin’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. ×soulangeana. Lennarth Jonnson, Sweden, raised from seed provided by Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers pale pink, flower buds rarely damaged by cold.

‘Manchu Fan’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 15(2): 9, 1979

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii). Gresham hybrid. Compare M. denudata, but of a more robust structure and leaf.

‘March Til Frost’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 16, 2000

([M. liliiflora × M. cylindrica] × M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Ruby’). August Kehr, Hendersonvillle, NC (R16-93). Selected 1997, introduced 1999. Flowers continuously throughout the summer, with most appearing before the leaves. Flowers primarily from axillary buds (proleptic flowers) = M. acuminata ‘May till Frost’

‘Marderiensis’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 104. 1916

M. grandiflora. Probably = ‘Maillardiere’.

‘Mardi Gras’

RareFind Nursery website. http://www.rarefindnursery.com/. Accessed 28 Mar 2018

M. virginiana var. australis. A registered trademark unavailable for use as a cultivar epithet. See ‘Mattie Mae Smith’.

‘Margaret Davis’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 20, 1989

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Shady Grove Nursery, Orangeburg, SC. Flowers 20-28 cm diameter.

‘Margaret Helen’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 15, 2005

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. campbellii). Vance Hooper, Duncan & Davies Nurseries, New Plymouth, Taranaki, New Zealand. Upright vase-shaped when young, becoming more rounded with age. Estimated mature height to 8 m. Flowers large, rosy-red at base, fading to purple-pink towards the tips. 12 tepals, oval shaped, 12 × 6 cm. Light, fruity fragrance.

‘Margaretta’ [Incertae sedis]

Ashe, Torreya 31(2):37, 1931

M. grandiflora. Described as forma. From a regional form at Juniper Head Creek, Okaloosa County, FL encountered by W. W. Ashe in 1928-1929 with vase-shaped flowers, revolute leaves, and retuse sepals. This does not appear to have been introduced as a cultivar under this epithet, but the name is sufficiently similar to ‘Margarita’, ‘Margarite’, and ‘Margaritta’ to warrant inclusion here for comparative purposes.

‘Margarita’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 102, 1994

M. grandiflora. Saratoga Horticultural Foundation, Saratoga, CA, 1958. Small, ca 6 m height with a similar spread. Leaves large, lustrous, prominently veined. Likely distinct from M. grandiflora f. margaretta (listed as ‘Margaretta’ in this register), though examination of leaf margins, flower shape, and sepals would be desirable to confirm.

‘Margarite’

Magnolia 41(1) [Issue 79]:12, 2006

M. grandiflora. Selected by Powell Gardens, Kansas City, MO, ca 2006. From a tree in Independence, MO. Compact habit, apple-green foliage, abundant flowering. According to article 21.23, this cultivar epithet cannot be established due to its similarity with ‘Margarita’, another M. grandiflora selection registered in 1958 by the Saratoga Horticultural Research Foundation. There is already some evidence of confusion in the literature between ‘Margarita’ and M. grandiflora f. margaretta, a regional form in the Florida Panhandle (see ‘Margaritta’).

‘Margaritta’

Orr & Furuta, Highlights of Agricultural Research 10 (3), Fall 1963, Auburn, Alabama

M. grandiflora. Referenced by photo and caption only. Photo depicts cut branchlets of ‘Glen St. Mary’ and ‘Margaritta’, caption describes both as “producing dark green foliage with heavy brownness underneath”. ‘Margaritta’ here shows a prominent midvein and undulating to revolute margins. Though Orr & Furuta list as a cultivar, this would seem to be M. grandiflora f. margaretta Ashe based on photos leaf margins. However, Orr & Furuta reference this as a named variety. Likely distinct from the M. grandiflora ‘Margarita’ registered by the Saratoga Horticultural Foundation in the late 1950’s. See M. grandiflora ‘Margaretta’ (incertae sedis).

‘Marguerite’

Magnolia 53:2 [Issue 104]: 9, 2018

(‘Anne Rosse’ × ‘Purple Breeze’). Hybridized by Philippe de Spoelberch at Arboretum Wespelaar, Haacht, Belgium, 1996. Selected in 2011, introduced ca 2018. Flowers large to 25 cm in diameter, with 10-11 spatulate tepals 13-15 cm in length, red-pink at base grading to orchid pink at tip. Eighty stamens. Fruits often twisted or curved. Compare ‘Purple Breeze’ but flowers firmer and less frost sensitive.

‘Marillyn’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 20, 1989

(liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × kobus). Evamaria Sperber, Brooklyn Botanic Garden, NY, 1957. To 2-3 m with a similar spread in 10 years. Flowers dark red-purple to 13 cm diameter, close resemblance to M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’.

‘Marj Gossler’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 220, 1994

See ‘Marjory Gossler’

‘Marjorie Congreve’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide. p. 178. 2000

M. sargentiana. Selected by Ambrose Congreve, Mount Congreve, Waterford, Ireland. Flowers pink, very large.

‘Marjory Gossler’

Magnolia 21(2) [Issue 42]: 12, 1986-7

(M. denudata × M. sargentiana). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers white with some pink to the outer base. 7-8 tepals, 12-15 cm long. Compare M. ×veitchii, but more cold-hardy. Often listed or sold as ‘Marj Gossler’, but the cultivar registration reads ‘Marjory Gossler’ and is considered the accepted epithet. = M. ‘Marj Gossler’

‘Mark Jury’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 17, 1984

(M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’ × M. sargentiana). Flowers similar in size and shape to M. campbellii, but tepals colored magenta-rose. Strong evergreen fragrance.

‘Martha Joan Leslie’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

(‘Rose Marie’ × ‘Blushing Belle’). John Galbraith hybrid given to Nigel Holman, selected and raised by Andrew Leslie. Flowers large, deep purple pink when emerging from bud, a lighter shade when fully open.

‘Marwood Spring’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide. p. 189. 2000

M. sprengeri var. diva. Upright, small to medium sized. Flowers deep red-purple outside, white flushed purple inside. 15 cm diameter, 12 tepals.

‘Mary Chalice’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018. Nomen nudum. Photos depict large white flowers with pink base to inner tepals.

‘Mary Nell’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 221, 1994

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid selected by Ken Durio, Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA (JCMcD#2, LA#87, G66#1358). Vigorous, shrubby. Leaves olive-green. Flowers cup-shaped, white with purple base, to 25 cm diameter. Tepals thick. Named in 1986 in honor of Mary Nell McDaniel, wife of Dr. J. C. McDaniel. = M. ‘Joe McDaniel 2’.

‘Mary Slankard’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 15-16, 1992

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Selected by Joe McDaniel and Phil Savage. Flowers with bottom half rich pink, top half pure white. 9 tepals. Foliage and habit comparable to ‘Diva’. Phil Savage suggested that the pollen parent may be M. denudata.

‘Mary Williams’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 79: 417. 1954

M. campbellii. Rt. Hon. Charles Williams, M. P., Caerhays Castle, Cornwall, England. Purple flowers with 12 tepals, obovate spatulate in shape, ca 14 × 8 cm.

‘Maryland’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 8(1): 8-9, 1976

(M. virginiana × M. grandiflora). Oliver Freeman, U.S. National Arboretum, 1959. Comparable to ‘Freeman’ (of the same origin and parentage), but with lighter foliage color and less columnar habit. Roots easily from vegetative cuttings. Tetraploid, 2n=4x=76.

‘Mason Form’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 60: 60-62, 2009

M. campbellii. From a plant at “The Gums”, Taita, New Zealand first flowering during the mid-1880’s and propagated and distributed thereafter. Flowers bright reddish-pink, adapted to various climates in New Zealand. Cannot be established due to use of the word “form” (Art. 21.16).

‘Massy Rosea’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. stellata. Nomen nudum. See ‘King Rose’.

‘Mattie Mae Smith’

United States Patent #PP12204, 2001

M. virginiana var. australis. Selected by John Allen Smith, Chunchula, AL. Mature leaves variegated pale yellow to olive-green against deep green.= M. virginiana var. australis ‘Mardi Gras’. Marketed as MARDI GRAS™, though was registered with USPTO prior to cancellation in 2009.

‘Maulévrie’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook, p. 195, 2018

M. grandiflora. Dwarf selection ca 1.5 × 2.5 m in 40 years. Currently growing at Parc floral de la Beaujoire. Details of origin uncertain. Likely from the Arboretum of Angers, France, currently called Arboretum Gaston-Allard, formerly Arboretum de la Maulévrie.

‘Maxima’

Arb. Frut. Brit. 1: 273, 1838

M. acuminata. Growth more vigorous; leaves larger than typical. Plant received from Parmentier of France.

‘Maxima’

Le Bon Jardinier 1833: 734, 1833

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Maxine Merrill’

Fairweather Gardens nursery catalog, Spring 1999

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × M. ×loebneri ‘Merrill’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers starry bright yellow. reminiscent in form of M. ×loebneri. Six sturdy tepals.

‘May Day’

Langford, Check List of the Cultivated Magnolias, p. 75, 1994

M. ×soulangeana. Distributed and potentially introduced by Wyoming Nurseries, USA before 1961. Late flowering.

‘Maya’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’). Jef van Meulder, Arboretum Bokrijk, Genk, Belgium. Flowers pure white.

‘Mayardiensis’

Baumann, Cat. p. 26. 1842, Bollwiller & Mulhouse, France

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. See ‘Maillardiere’.

‘Mayardierensis’

Leroy, catalogue P. 65. 1866, Angers, France

M. grandiflora. See ‘Maillardiere’.

‘Mayer’

Proc. Internatl. Pl. Prop. Soc. 20: 201-202, 1970

M. virginiana var. virginiana. J. C. McDaniel, Urbana, IL. Free-flowering, precocious, multi-stemmed shrub to 3 m height. Original plant from Prof. Robert W. Mayer, Champaign, IL. Seeds smaller than typical.

‘Mazeppa’

Magnolia 47(1) [Issue 91]: 41-49, 2012

(‘Anne Rosse’ × ‘Anne Rosse’). John Weagle, Nova Scotia, Canada, from seed collected by Philippe de Spoelberch, Belgium. Flowers large, white, somewhat floppy. Nine tepals: outer six larger (16 cm length × 11 cm width) and overlapping, inner three reduced in width (16 cm length × 8 cm width) and obscuring reproductive parts of flower. Outer surface of inner tepals often flushed pink.

‘Melanie’

See ‘Purple Princess’.

‘Melissa Parris’

Magnolia 51(1) [Issue 99]: 28-29, 2016

(‘Silk Road’ × M. insignis ‘Anita Figlar’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected and raised by Kevin Parris, Spartanburg, SC. Vigorous, tardily deciduous tree with central leader, ca 7 × 2 m in 4 years. First flowered 2014, on the birthday of the introducer’s wife and named in her honor. Flowers to 18 cm diameter, outer tepals fair rosy-pink.

‘Melon Sky’

lunaplant.de website. http://www.lunaplant.de/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘Pickard’s Sundew’ × M. ×brooklynensis ‘Titan’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Flowers peachy-pink.

‘Memorial Garden’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 694, 2009

M. salicifolia. Pyramidal habit, white flowers. Uncertain as to distinctness from type.

‘Mengii’

Leroy, Cat. p. 79. 1873, Angers, France

M. grandiflora. ‘de Mengi’ - nomen nudum.

‘Mercury’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

A trade designation not available for use as a cultivar epithet. See ‘NCMX1’.

‘Merlin’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 58: 2007, 16-20

M. ×wieseneri. Hybridized by Tim Thornton. Flowers large, fragrant.

‘Merrill’

Arnoldia 12: 45, 1952

M. ×loebneri. Karl Sax, Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, MA, ca 1940s. Grows quickly to 8m height. Flowers white, larger than typical for either parent. A cross made by one of Dr. Sax’s students in 1939. Named for Elmer Merrill, a former director of the Arnold Arboretum. = M. loebneri ‘Dr. Merrill’.

‘Meyers’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 685, 2009

M. grandiflora. From Tifton, GA. Second largest of species in the US per Dirr (2009).

‘MGMIG2007’

United States Patent, #PP32540, 2020

(Unnamed selection × ‘Genie’). Vance Hooper, Waitara, New Zealand, 2008. Rounded habit, small leaves, and purple, upright cup-shaped flowers. Probably = ‘Mighty Mouse’.

‘MGPIN2010’

United States Patent, #PP32541, 2020

(‘Aurora’ × ‘Genie’). Vance Hooper, Waitara, New Zealand, 2013. Upright to fastigiate tree, narrow leaves, flowers red-purple to dark pink. Second flush of flowers typically following in summer. Probably = ‘Pink Pyramid’ (same parentage and introducer).

‘MGPRO2008’

United States Patent, #PP32539, 2020

(‘Amethyst Flame’ × ‘Genie’). Vance Hooper, Waitara, New Zealand, 2009. Compact habit, bright pink flowers with some summer remontancy. Probably = ‘Pink Promise’ (same parentage and introducer).

‘MGTIG’

Wight Nurseries Buyers Guide, p. 42, 2005

M. grandiflora. John Barbour. Leaves glossy, convex. Marketed as GREENBACK™.

‘MGYOD209A’

United States Patent, #PP32668, 2020

(‘Star Wars’ × ‘Genie’). Vance Hooper, Waitara, New Zealand, 2010. Compact, upright tree. Flowers pale pink to pure white with darker base. Compare ‘Star Wars’, but smaller. = M. ‘Stellar Ruby’; = M. ‘Yoda’.

‘MICjur01’

United States Patent, #PP21873, 2011

(M. laevifolia × M. ×foggii ‘Mixed Up Miss’). Hybridized 1996 by Mark Jury, North Taranaki, New Zealand. Similar to M. laevifolia, but larger flowers, colored light pink. Compact habit.= M. ‘Fairy Magnolia Blush’. Marketed as FAIRY MAGNOLIA® BLUSH.

‘MicJur02’

United States Patent, #PP25850, 2015

(M. laevifolia ‘Velvet and Cream’ × M. ×foggii ‘Mixed up Miss’). Hybridized 1995 by Mark Jury, North Taranaki, New Zealand. Evergreen, compact, tolerant of pruning/shaping. Fragrant white flowers.= M. ‘Fairy Magnolia Cream’. Marketed as FAIRY MAGNOLIA® CREAM.

‘MICJUR05’

United States Patent, #PP25870, 2015

(M. laevifolia ‘Velvet and Cream’ × M. doltsopa ‘Silver Cloud’). Hybridized 1995 by Mark Jury, North Taranaki, New Zealand. Pyramidal. Somewhat compact. White flowered, floriferous. 12 weeks of flowering, beginning late Winter. = M. ‘Fairy Magnolia White’. Marketed as FAIRY MAGNOLIA® BLUSH.

‘Michael Murphy’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag., 60: 112-113, 2009

M. campbellii. Mount Congreve Estate, Ireland. From wild collected seed in the Darjeeling, India area. Named for one of the principal gardeners at the estate. Specific characteristics uncertain.

‘Michael Rosse’

Hilliers Man. of Trees and Shrubs, Ed. 2., 1973

Flowers large, soft purple. From a beautiful tree grown at Nymans, Sussex, England. Believed to be a seedling of M. sargentiana.

‘Michelle’

Magnolia 41(2) [Issue 80]: 1-3, 2006

M. laevifolia. More compact than the type.

‘Michiko Renge’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 5, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Shuichi Hirao, before 1970. Semi-double, fragrant. Apparently introduced into the USA via Todd Gresham, Santa Cruz, CA.

‘Microphylla’

Le Bon Jardinier 1833: 734, 1833

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Microphylla’

Millet, Mem. Soc. Agric. Sci. Arts Angers 3: 84, 1835

M. virginiana. Small shrub, branches dense. Leaves small, ca 4-6 cm long, often bifid at apex. Obtained from seed in 1828. Probably akin to ‘Apalachee’ and similar cultivars.

‘MICWC’

IP Australia Website. https://www.ipaustralia.gov.au/. Accessed 1 Aug 2021.

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. figo, probably pollinated by M. laevifolia). Barry Humphris, Humphris Nursery, Mooroolbark, Victoria, Australia, 2012. Flowers cream-yellow, from red-purple buds. Registered with IP Australia (Application Number 2012/082). Marketed as WHITE CAVIAR™. = M. ‘White Caviar’.

‘Mighty Mouse’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 63: 21, 2010

(‘Genie’ × unknown). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Dwarf. Perhaps a trade designation (See ‘MGMIG2007’), though a trademark does not appear to be claimed so potentially available for use as a cultivar epithet. = M. ‘MGMIG2007’.

‘Milky Way’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 44: 52, 1992

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × ‘Mark Jury’). Flowers white with soft pink base. Large, heavy-textured. Sister seedling of ‘Athene’.

‘Millai’s Clone’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. grandiflora. Originating in Fota Botanic Garden, Ireland. Dark, glossy leaves.= M. grandiflora ‘Millais Variety’

‘Millais Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, circa 1973, p, 8, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. obovata. ‘Claimed by Millais to be a superior form.’ Treseder (1978) does not list. Callaway (1994) lists but provides no description. Without a description, this must be rejected as not published per Article 27.1.

‘Millais Variety’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 685, 2009

M. grandiflora. Originating in Fota Botanical Garden, Cork, Ireland. Leaves glossy, nearly black-green. Not established. Per article 21.16, “variety” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958. Must = ‘Millais Clone’.

‘Millie Galyon’

Langford, Check List of the Cultivated Magnolias, p. 83, 1994

(M. ×veitchii × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Frank Galyon, Knoxville, TN. Flowers with mid-rosy purple exterior, white interior, to 18 cm diameter, nine tepals. Flowers eventually open flat, but the inner three of nine tepals remain upright after first opening as in M. campbellii. Named for the originator’s wife.

‘Milliken’

Broken Arrow Nursery website. https://www.brokenarrownursery.com/magnolia-x-soulangiana-milliken-milliken- magnolia.html. Accessed 3 Mar 2018

M. ×soulangeana. See ‘Kate Brook’.

‘Milton’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 17, 1984

M. virginiana var. australis. Peter del Tredici from a tree in Milton, MA. Upright, columnar. Long, narrow leaves four times longer than wide. Self-fertile. Hardy and sets copious amounts of viable seed. Dirr (2009) feels this is better considered a seed strain.

‘Milton’s Wavy’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 102, 1994

M. grandiflora. Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA. Leaf margins undulate.

‘Min Pyong-gal’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 18-19, 2001

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Leaves narrower than typical. Flowers with pink-tipped tepals. Discovered in the wild in South Korea; named in September 2000 by Olav Kalleberg, Norway. Previously distributed by Eisenhut as ‘Pink Tipped Form #2’. = M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii ‘Ferris Miller’; = M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii ‘Pink Tipped Form’

‘Minfor’

Minier Solutions Pro website, https://www.pepinieres-minier.fr/, Accessed 8 Jan 2019

M. denudata. Selected by Minier in 1998. Flowers pink. To 4 m × 3 m in 10 years. Marketed as FESTIROSE®.

‘Mini Mouse’

Magnolia 18(2) [Issue 34]: 4, 1982

M. liliiflora (liliiflora × liliiflora ‘Nigra’). Hybridized by Oswald Blumhardt, Whangarei, New Zealand. Leaves small, 5 cm. Thin stems. Flowers dull purple, to 8 cm.

‘Mini Mouse’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook 2013, p. 52

M. laevifolia. Callaghan and Png (2013) list as recent introduction in America but do not provide description. Must = ‘Minnie Mouse’. ‘Mini Mouse’ was already registered for a M. liliiflora selection.

‘Minnie Mouse’

Magnolien und Tulpenbäume, p. 178, 2019

M. laevifolia. Dwarf form. Floriferous. Strict interpretation of the code would preclude establishment due to ease of confusion with ‘Mini Mouse’, though it seems unlikely a M. liliiflora and M. laevifolia selection would become confused in the trade due to vastly different phenotype. = M. laevifolia ‘Mini Mouse’

‘Minor’

Nicholson, Dict. Gard. Cent. Suppl. 512. 1901

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Introduced from Japan, 1888. Smaller in all its parts than the type.

‘Minor’

Schelle in Beissner et al., Handb. Laubholz-Benennung 99. 1903

M. stellata. Nomen nudum.

‘Minor’

Pampanini, Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 185, 1916

M. ×wieseneri. Very small in all its parts.

‘Mira’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×soulangeana). Günther Nograsek, Styria, Austria. Broad, upright habit. Flowers similar to M. ×soulangeana, appearing before the leaves and changing from bright purple to purple-pink.

‘Miranja’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

Jef van Meulder, Arboretum Bokrijk, Genk, Belgium, 2002, from seed supplied by J. C. McDaniel. Alleged cross was ‘Busey’ × ‘Miss Honeybee’, though large pale pink flowers suggest another pollen parent, perhaps campbellii-type. Strong pyramidal habit with pale pink flowers. Some distribution as Magnolia G 36 B. = M. ‘Pink Tilkin’.

‘Miss Bogue’

Kosar, Gard. Jour. 14: 45, 1964

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. See ‘Edith Bogue’.

‘Miss Honeybee’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 171, 1994

M. acuminata var. subcordata. James Merrill Nursery, Painesville, OH, before 1972. More vigorous and with larger flowers than typical.

‘Miss Jack’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 6, 1980-81, Springfield, Oregon

Characteristics vague. Apparently originated as a seedling from the University of British Columbia, comparable in some way to ‘Iufer’ but less floriferous. Generally listed as a selection of M. salicifolia, but probably better treated as a hybrid. A plant under this name growing at Powell Gardens did not have anise-scented leaves (Branhagen, 2006), a useful characteristic to distinguish true M. salicifolia from M. ×proctoriana or M. kobus × M. salicifolia hybrids (e.g. ‘Kewensis’, ‘Iufer’). Per Yinger (2007), it is “clearly a hybrid”.

‘Miss Marble’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Ruby’ × ‘JURmag1’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Large bright pink flowers with a marbled pattern to the inside of the tepals.

‘Mississippi Clone’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 102, 1994

M. macrophylla. Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA. Leaves larger than the species. Flowers pure white.

‘Mister Yellowjacket’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 24, 1994

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Selected by Richard B. Figlar, Pomona, New York from the yard of an abandoned home on Red Schoolhouse Road, Montvale, NJ. Small rounded tree with spreading habit, to 8 × 9 m. Flowers canary yellow to orange yellow, less glaucous than usual. Appearing profusely in mid-summer and again (less profusely) in late summer.

‘Mixed up Miss’

Greenleaf Nurseries website, https://greenleafnurseries.co.nz/, Accessed 9 Jan 2019

M. ×foggii. Introduced by Os Blumhardt, New Zealand, before 1996. Sister seedling to ‘Bubbles’ (or at least of the same parentage). Evergreen, flowers pale purple towards tepal apex. 3-4m. Per Luc De Jonge, flowers tinted pink and similar in shape to M. figo, but larger.

‘Moegi Dori’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 1, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Introduced by Nakamura, Japan. Similar in size and shape to ‘Koban Dori’ but flowering later in mid-May.

‘Momoju’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 697, 2009

M. ×soulangeana. Introduced by Nakamura, Japan. Flowers large, pink. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Momoyu’.

‘Momoyu’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

M. ×soulangeana. See ‘Momoju’.

‘Mon Champa’

Magnolia 44(2) [Issue 86]:1-4, 2009

(M. liliifera var. liliifera × M. champaca). Satha Suesatcha, Wieng Dok Mai Horn, Thailand. Flowers yellow-orange, upright with broad, fully open tepals. ‘Mun Jum Pa’ is a spelling error/variation.

‘Monland’

Magnolia 23(2) [Issue 44]: 7-8, 1988

M. grandiflora. R. Eiland, Millbrook, AL, 1969. Broad oval habit. Leaves narrow with long petioles, glossy green above, moderate indumentum below. Flowers 25-30 cm diameter, 12 tepals. Produces abundant flowers over a very long season. Initially suggested as hybrid with M. virginiana, though flow cytometery by Parris et al. (2010) indicates pure M. grandiflora. Marketed as TIMELESS BEAUTY®.

‘Monlia’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 326. 1996

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Monrovia Nursery Co., Azusa, CA, 1963. Open branched, pyramidal. Leaves and flowers larger than type. Marketed as MAJESTIC BEAUTY®.

‘Mont Blanc’

Safro Milan Havlis website, https://www.havlis.cz/, Accessed 28 Jan 2020

M. grandiflora. Flowers 25-40 cm in diameter. Flowering from young age (3 years).

‘Moon Garden’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 81, 1994

M. denudata. Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA. Flowers pure white. Fragrant.

‘Moonchimes’

Louisiana Nurseries catalog, p. 248, No date (circa 1995-1997)

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Brozzonii’ × M. doltsopa). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. No description other than parentage. Despite limited description, tentatively accepted in order to alleviate confusion with other “Yuchelia” selections. See Yuchelia [2] for description of cross.

‘Moondance’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 334, 1996

Gresham hybrid. Flowers early, white, pink at base. Nearly 30 cm diameter.

‘Moonlight’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 61: 85, 2010

Gresham hybrid, selected in Gloster Arboretum, Gloster, MS, by David Clulow circa 1981 (DC1). Flowers similar to M. campbellii, late season, white.

‘Moonrocket’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. ×veitchii (M. ×veitchii × M. denudata). Os Blumhardt, New Zealand. Flowers large, white.

‘Moonspire’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×brooklynensis). Upright habit. Dark foliage. Flowers yellow-orange.

‘Moresk’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 221-2, 1994

(M. campbellii × M. sargentiana). Leaves elliptic, to 20 cm length. Flowers cup-and-saucer shape, deep rose-pink. 11-12 tepals arranged in three whorls, to 25 cm diameter.

‘Morris Fragrant’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

M. kobus. Per Tony Aiello (pers. comm., 2018), this originates from a pre-1932 (and now dead) accession at the Morris Arboretum (1946-615*A). Fragrance fantastic, compare grape juice or grape chewing gum (or potentially M. salicifolia ‘Grape Expectations’). Propagated and distributed by Pleasant Run Nursery circa 2010. Sometimes referred to as M. ×loebneri, though flowers consist of 6 wide tepals more akin to M. kobus.

‘Mortieriana’

Bosse, Verz. Handb. Blumeng., Ed. 2, 2: 464, 1841

M. virginiana. From Mortier of Liege, Belgium. Characteristics uncertain.

‘Mossman’s Giant’

Magnolia 21(2) [Issue 40]: 16, 1986

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. sargentiana). Originated at Iufer Nursery, Salem, OR. Leaves ca 18 × 10 cm. Flowers red-purple outside, inside white. Tepals 18 × 10 cm. Flowers overall resemble sargentiana, while the leaves resemble campbellii.

‘Mount Hakkoda’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 172, 2000

M. salicifolia. Gardiner (2000) listed as the current name for M. salicifolia ‘Concolor’, but ‘Concolor’ was previously established and should have priority. See ‘Concolor’.

‘Mount Pirongia’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

M. campbellii. Selected by Ian Baldick, New Zealand, from a garden in Pirongia. Tepals round, overlapping.

‘Moyer Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 1, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. acuminata. Vigorous tree with large leaves. Original citation as “Mayer Clone” but spelling variant ‘Moyer Clone’ appears to be more common. Treseder (1978) instead lists as ‘Moyer’.

‘Mr Julian’

Magnolia 52(1) [Issue 100]: 23, 2017

(M. sargentiana × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Charles Michael, Caerhays Castle, Cornwall, England. Late-season flowerer, continuing after M. campbellii has completed. Flowers large, erect, reddish purple when open, fading to purple-pink or light purple. 16 m height in 64 years.

‘Mt. Pulaski’

M. virginiana var. virginiana. In commerce through Shadow Nursery under this name ca 1994. Probably a temporary name for ‘Havener’ as McDaniel selected this cultivar from Mt. Pulaski, IL. See ‘Havener’.

‘Multiflora’

Rovelli Fratelli, Cat. #185, p. 43. 1915, Intra, Italy

M. virginiana. Nomen nudum.

‘Multipetal’

Magnolia 19(1) [Issue 35]: 23, 1983

M. sargentiana. Selected by Sir Peter Smithers. Flowers with 19 to 27 tepals instead of the usual 10 to 16. Original plant growing at Mount Congreve, Waterford, Ireland. = M. sargentiana ‘Vico Multipetal’

‘Multitepal’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 221-2, 1994

M. delavayi. Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA. Flowers large, to 20 cm diameter. 33 tepals. Uncertain if this refers to the same plant evaluated by Kunming Botanic Gardens ca 2000 (described as having 20+ tepals), though the descriptions are sufficiently vague to warrant synonymy, particularly due to their origin as seed forms.

‘Multitepaled’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Kehr. No description, not established.

‘Mustila’

Magnolia 48(2) [Issue 94]:13, 2013

M. kobus. Hardy. Originated at and named for Arboretum Mustila in Finland. Flowering May (Finland).

‘MVHH’

RareFind Nursery catalog, p. 45, 2016

M. virginiana var. australis. Selected by Alex Neubauer, Hidden Hollow Nursery, TN. Upright, mostly evergreen form. Marketed as GREEN MILE™.

‘MVMTF’

United States Patent #PP27589P3, 2016

M. virginiana var. australis. Selected by Dwayne Moon, Loganville, GA, from seedlings purchased from a Florida nursery. Upright, small leaves, dense canopy, profuse flowering, tendency to remain evergreen in the winter. Marketed as KELTYK®.

‘MXPBCN’

IP Australia Website. https://www.ipaustralia.gov.au/. Accessed 1 Aug 2021.

(M. laevifolia ‘Scented Pearl’ × M. foggii ‘Bubbles’). Leo Koelwyn, Coolwyn Nurseries, Monbulk, Victoria, Australia, 2010. Upright evergreen tree, pink flowers with broad tepals. Registered with IP Australia (Application Number 2016/246). Marketed as PINK BOUQUET.

‘MXPPCN’

IP Australia Website. https://www.ipaustralia.gov.au/. Accessed 1 Aug 2021.

(M. laevifolia ‘Scented Pearl’ × M. foggii ‘Bubbles’). Leo Koelwyn, Coolwyn Nurseries, Monbulk, Victoria, Australia, 2010. Upright evergreen tree, purple flowers. Registered with IP Australia (Application Number 2016/247). Marketed as PINK PEARL.

‘MXWPCN’

IP Australia Website. https://www.ipaustralia.gov.au/. Accessed 1 Aug 2021.

(M. laevifolia ‘Scented Pearl’ × M. doltsopa). Leo Koelwyn, Coolwyn Nurseries, Monbulk, Victoria, Australia, 2010. Evergreen tree, small to mid-sized white flowers. Registered with IP Australia (Application Number 2016/245). Marketed as WHITE PEARL.

‘Mystery’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 16, 2000

(‘Little Gem’ × ‘Genesis’ [purported]). Frank Galyon hybrid selected by August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, 1995. Small in stature. Leaves with unusual secondary netting of the leaves, typical of that found on sieboldii × virginiana hybrids. Flowers white, typical of M. grandiflora.

‘Mystery Diva’

M. sprengeri var. diva. Phil Savage. See ‘Dark Diva’.

‘Nakamura 2’

Derenne and Grossin. Une Collection Francaise De Magnolia. Arboretum des Grandes Bruyeres, 2012

= ‘Fukuju’ per de Spoelberch in Hunt, Magnolias and their Allies, p.225, 1998; Heerdegen and Eisenhut, p. 237, 2019. See ‘Fukuju’.

‘Nakamura No 3’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 697, 2009.

Flowers pale purple-pink, white interior. Per Article 21.19, this epithet could not be established due to use of #. Article 35.8 allows establishment if replaced with abbreviation “No”.

‘Nakamura 5 Toju’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018.

See ‘Toju’.

‘Nakamura 6’

Derenne and Grossin. Une Collection Francaise De Magnolia. Arboretum des Grandes Bruyeres, 2012

Nakamura hybrid. Flowers dark pink, wide tepals, interior white. M. ×soulangeana?

‘Nakamura 8 Suishoren’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018.

Description notes “a very fine pink” but photos depict M. ×loebneri type with nine white tepals. See ‘Suishoren’.

‘Nakamura HO’

Magnolien und Tulpenbäume, p. 238, 2019

See ‘Fukuju’.

‘Nana Compacta’

Morton Arb. Bull. 24: 22, 1949

M. kobus. Slow growing, compact, to 2.5 m. Originated in the old Kohankie Nursery of Painesville, Ohio, before 1950. 50+ year old specimens at The Morton Arboretum (Lisle, IL) produce few to no flowers, but have retained the dwarf, compact habit.

‘Nana Praecox’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 104, 1916.

M. grandiflora. Leaves coriaceous, rugose, apex rotund. Flowers precocious.

‘Nanatensis’

M. grandiflora. See ‘Nannetensis’.

‘Nancy Hardy’

Gardiner, Magnolias, p. 133, 1989

M. campbellii. Alan and Carolyn Hardy, Sandling Park, Hythe, Kent, England ca 1984. Large tree. Flowers white flushed pink. Up to 35 cm in diameter, 12 tepals each 15 cm long.

‘Nancy’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56: 20, 2005

Nancy and Deryck Lawrence, North Island, New Zealand. Compact habit, flowers purple.

‘Nanjing Red’

Hogan, Trees for all Seasons, p. 183, 2008

M. figo var. crassipes. Cistus Nursery, Portland, OR. Flowering for at least a month from late winter to late spring.

‘Nannetensis’

Denis, Rev. Hort. 1865: 109, 1865

M. grandiflora. Flowers double, very floriferous. First grown by Delaunay of Angers, per Mouillefert, Traite 112 (1891). ‘Nanatensis’ a frequent mispelling. = M. grandiflora ‘Nanatensis’; = M. grandiflora ‘Nannetensis Flore Pleno’; = M. grandiflora ‘Precoce des Nantes’.

‘Nannetensis Flore Pleno’

Mottet in Nicholson, Dict. Prat. Hort. 3: 232, T. 35, Fig. 2. 1895

M. grandiflora. See ‘Nannetensis’.

‘Narrowleaf’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, p. 376, 1942

M. grandiflora. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See ‘Exmouth’.

‘Narubi Fox’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. Probably = ‘November Fox’. See ‘November Fox’.

‘NCMX1’

United States Patent Application #20170290221P1, 2016

(M. ×lobneri ‘Encore’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexandrina’). Tom Ranney, Mills River, NC. Narrow habit. Flowers large, red-purple, fragrant. = M. ‘Mercury’. Marketed as MERCURY™.

‘Ned’s Northern Belle’

M. virginiana var. australis. See ‘Northern Belle’.

‘Neil McEacharn’

Extr. Proc. p. 20, Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 87, 1962

M. ×loebneri (M. kobus × M. stellata ‘Rosea’). From seed sent by Captain Neil McEacharn about 1953, raised at Windsor. Tree-like habit, flowers small as with M. stellata. Sometimes listed as M. stellata, though arborescent habit suggests closer to M. ×loebneri. = M. stellata ‘Neil McEachern’

‘Neil McEachern’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 17, 1984

M. stellata. See ‘Neil McEacharn’.

‘Nelly’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘Atlas’ × ‘Vulcan’). Michael Gottschalk, Germany. Flowers dark outside, light pink inside.

‘Nelson’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 9(2): 13, 1973

M. acuminata. Propagated from a witches’-broom on an old tree belonging to William Nelson, Princeton, IL. Presumably resulted in a slow-growing, dwarf selection.

‘Neva Black’

Dirr, Michael Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 693, 2009

M. fraseri var. pyramidata. Fragrant selection introduced by Louisiana Nursery. Release appears to have been very limited. Rare in cultivation.

‘New Pink’

Gardening Express website, http://gardeningexpress.co.uk, Accessed 28 March 2020

Gardening Express, 2017. Large white flowers with pink base. Compact.

‘New River’

(M. insignis ‘Anita Figlar’ × M. fraseri). Kevin Parris, Spartanburg, SC. 2010 cross. Pollen collected from M. fraseri at the New River Gorge Bridge, Victor, WV. Budwood sent to Heritage Seedlings for distribution. Likely with reddish-pink flowers (compare ‘Melissa Parris’), but characteristics currently uncertain.

‘Nexus’

Per Piet Vergeldt Nursery website (magnoliastore.com), this = ‘Pink Flanell’. See ‘Pink Flanell’.

‘Niemetzii’

Mitt. Deutsch. Dendr. Ges. 16: 256, 1907

M. ×soulangeana. Columnar or fastigiate. Pointed, purple flowers.

‘Nigra’

Robinson, The Garden 17: 468, 1883

M. liliiflora. Flowers narrow, deep purplish maroon on both surfaces. 8-10 tepals, ca 10 × 5 cm. Hardy. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Nigra’; = M. denudata ‘Nigricans’; = M. liliiflora ‘Atropurpurea’; = M. liliiflora ‘Purple’

‘Nigra’

Nicholson, The Garden 25: 276, T. 434, 1884

M. ×soulangeana. See M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’.

‘Nigra Select’

Zahradnictvi Safro Milan Havlis website. http://www.havlis.cz. Accessed 6 April 2018

M. liliiflora. Selected by Mr. Giovanni and Rolando Tesi in late 1980s. Compare M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ but with flowers opening wider.

‘Nigricans’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 201, 1915

M. denudata. See M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’.

‘Nimbus’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 17-18, 1984

(M. obovata × M. virginiana var. australis). Hybridized by William F. Kosar and introduced by Frank S. Santamour Jr., U.S. National Arboretum, 1980. Can be grown as single or multi-trunked specimen, with a fuller appearance in the latter case. Leaves generally whorled, to 30 cm long. Flowers with three sepals, pale green, obovate, rounded tips, 8 × 5 cm; eight creamy white tepals, elliptic and strongly concave, tips rounded or remotely apiculate. Sterile.

‘Nippon’

Ingram, Extr. Proc. p. 76, Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 940 1969.

Exhibited by Capt. Collingwood Ingram, The Grange, Benenden, Kent, England. Raised as M. kobus but now generally treated as kobus × salicifolia per Gardiner (2000).

‘Nitida’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 104, 1916

M. grandiflora. Leaves presumably lustrous above, which is usual, in varying degree, for the typical grandiflora.

‘Nobilis’

Wada, Jap. Gard. Treas., p. 36, circa 1925, Hakoneya Nurseries, Numazu-Shi, Japan

M. stellata. Pure white.

‘Norbert’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, p. 377, 1942

M. ×soulangeana. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Norbertii’.

‘Norbertiana’

Rehder in Bailey, Stand. Cycl. Hort. 4: 1919, 1916

M. ×soulangeana. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Norbertii’.

‘Norbertii’

Loudon, Arb. Frut. Brits 1: 279, 1838

M. ×soulangeana. Dwarf. Flowers reddish-purple. Apparently from Cels in 1800 per Krüssmann (1961). One of the latest flowering M. ×soulangeana. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Norbert’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Norbertiana’.

‘Norman Gould’

Hilliers Man. of Trees and Shrubs, Ed. 2, 1973

M. kobus. E. K. Janaki Ammal, ca 1950. Colchicine-induced polyploid Raised at the R.H.S. Gardens at Wisley. 8-9 tepals, broad and somewhat floppy. Compare ‘Janaki Ammal’

‘North Gold’

Magnolia 49(1) [Issue 95]: 39, 2014

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Slender with ascendant branches, to 11 m after 20 years. Flowers with yellow-green sepaloid and yellow petaloid tepals. Flowers do not fully open before senescence. Seedling from slender-form M. acuminata outside of Castile, New York, USA, raised and selected by Karl Flinck, Sweden.

‘North Pole’

RareFind Nursery catalog, p. 44, 2016

(M. ×loebneri ‘Leonard Messel’ × M. zenii). Randy Kobetich, Rehoboth Beach, DE. Upright, ca 9 × 2 m. New growth wine-red. Flowers white with dark pink stripe on outside of tepal.

‘North Star’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 326, 1996

M. grandiflora. Woodlanders Nursery, Aiken, SC. Tight, pyramidal.

‘Northstar’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 19, 2001

(M. acuminata × M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexandrina’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI, before 2000. Listed as pollen parent to ‘Pink Cameo’ with parentage provided, but no description. Cannot be established as ‘North Star’ was previously established for a M. grandiflora selection. In 2021, a plant at Green Bay Botanical Garden exhibited ca nine tepals, all of similar size and colored yellow with a pink blush to the base. Flowering was slightly later than ‘Elizabeth’.

‘Northern Belle’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 31, 1998

M. virginiana var. australis. Ned Bader, Ned’s Nursery, Inc., Amanda, OH. Narrow, to 8 × 3 m in 17 years. Cold-hardy selection with good leaf retention. = M. virginiana var. australis ‘Ned’s Northern Belle’

‘Northern Strain’

Louisiana Nurseries catalog, p. 87, 1994-1996

M. fraseri var. fraseri. From northernmost population of the species. Per Art 21.17, must reject as not established due to use of word “strain”. Likely not in reference to a specific form.

‘Northwest’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 222, 1994

(M. liliiflora × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Irene Burden, Hazel Dell Gardens, Canby, OR. Compare ‘Galaxy’, but less bushy, and flowers less floppy.

‘Norway Red’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 222, 1994

M. liliiflora. See ‘Holland Red’.

‘November Fox’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

M. grandiflora. Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Hardy. Leaf lower surfaces olive-brown. Last flowers on tree still visible in November.

‘Nymans’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 5, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. sargentiana. Likely clones from a renowned specimen growing at Nymans, described by James Comber (Head Gardener) in a letter to the Gardener’s Chronicle June 11, 1932. A partial description appears in Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 2000, p. 21.

‘O’Neill’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 9 (2): 22, 1973

M. liliiflora. Flowers closely match the color illustration for M. liliiflora in Johnstone (1955). 3 to 4 small sepaloid tepals plus 7 to 9 petaloid tepals larger and darker than the 6 petaloid tepals. Type tree was located at 615 W. John St., Champaign, IL

‘Obovata’

Aiton, Hort. Kew. 2: 251. 1789

M. grandiflora. Leaves obovate-oblong, flowers expansive. Introduced to Great Britain in 1734.

‘Obtusa’

Nouv. Dict. Hist. Nat. 13: 520. 1803, Paris

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Obtusifolia’

Page, Page’s Prodr. p. 37. 1817, Southampton, England. 2. Loddiges, Cat. Ed. 11, p. 29, 1818

M. grandiflora. Leaves obtuse, small, and rotund.

‘Ocean Wave’

Morris Arb. Bull. 12: 16, 1961

M. grandiflora. Leaves elliptic, margin particularly undulate. Original tree was at the University of Florida, Gainesville, FL.

‘Ochroleuca’

Schelle in Beissner et al., Handb. Laubholz Benennung, p. 101, 1903

M. virginiana. Nomen nudum.

‘Octopus’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 19, 2001

M. stellata (induced polyploid of M. stellata ‘Two Stones’). Induced by August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC and initially named ‘Edward A. Kehr’, but renamed with Dr. Kehr’s permission by Olav Kalleberg, Norway. Vigorous grower with flowers smaller than typical. Since flow cytometry data by Parris et al. (2010) demonstrated ‘Two Stones’ was likely a diploid, it is doubtful that ‘Octopus’ is an octoploid. It is more likely a tetraploid if polyploidy induction was successful, and diploid if not. = M. stellata ‘Edward A. Kehr’.

‘Odessamo’

Magnolia 41(2) [Issue 79]: 8-27, 2006

M. grandiflora. Selected by Powell Gardens, Kingsville, MO from a tree growing in Odessa, MO. Hardy, with little leaf burn observed over a 10 year period. Theorized to have originated as a sport from ‘Monlia’.

‘Odoratissima’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 233, 1915

M. virginiana. Nomen nudum. Presumably fragrant, though hardly distinct for the species.

‘Odoratissima’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 32: 166, 1907

M. ×soulangeana (M. denudata × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Flowers large, white and rose. Probably = ‘Fischeri’ (parentage and description match). See ‘Fischeri’.

‘Olav Kalleberg’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘JURmag1’ × M. lilliflora ‘Holland Red’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Flowers dark purple. Appearing in spring with significant remontancy (compare ‘March Til Frost’). Foliage lustrous dark green. Named for Olav Kalleberg, Sira, Norway (who also raised the plant).

‘Old Port’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 18, 2005

M. ×soulangeana (M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Sweet Simplicity’). Vance Hooper, Duncan & Davies Nurseries, New Plymouth, Taranaki, New Zealand. Small, multi-branched tree, estimated mature height ca 4 m. Flowers rich, dark, wine-purple. Tepal inner surfaces off-white lined along the veins and stained at the base a beet-root purple. Tepals ca 9 × 6 cm. Light, fruity fragrance.

‘Olivia’

Magnolia 38(2) [Issue 74]: 28-29, 2003

(M. acuminata × subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × ‘Gold Crown’). August Kehr hybrid selected by Koen Camelbeke and Philippe de Spoelberch of Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. Upright, pyramidal. Flowers yellow, appearing just before or with the first leaves, held upright until the end of flowering. Sepaloids yellow-green ca 4 × 1 cm, 6 petaloids, brilliant yellow, ca 8 × 2 cm.

‘Olmenhof’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 24-25, 2005

M. ×thompsoniana. Selected from Olmenhof Park in Herk de Stad, Belgium by Koen Camelbeke of Arboretum Wespelaar, Jef Van Meulder of Arboretum Bokrijk, and Wim Peeters of Kapelleberg, Belgium. Upright, broad, multi-stemmed tree. Leaves elliptic to broadly obovate to 25 × 11 cm. Lower surface silvery. Flowers white. Twelve petaloid tepals; three outer petaloids; nine inner petaloids; outer whorls about 11 × 6 cm, inner whorls smaller and narrower. Fragrance sweet, intense.

‘Ontario’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 24, 1994

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Selected by Richard B. Figlar from a wild population occurring in the Smith Tract, Charlotteville, Ontario, Canada. Selected to preserve and make available genetic material from an authentic Canadian wild population. An herbarium specimen of this cultivar is located at Clemson University (Voucher #1458).

‘Opal Haws’

Magnolia 18(2) [Issue 34]: 22, 1982

M. grandiflora. Leaves small, to 15 cm. Rusty brown indumentum. Flowers to 25 cm diameter. = M. grandiflora ‘Suzette’.

‘Opal’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 41: 61, 1988

M. ×soulangeana. Nomen nudum. See ‘Pickard’s Opal’.

‘Opelousas’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. virginiana. Tall, pyramidal tree. Leaves broad, to 18 cm length, deciduous in winter. Flowers 11 cm diameter, 11 tepals opening flat.

‘Orbit’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 103, 1994

M. grandiflora. J. C. McDaniel, Urbana, IL. Dwarf, compact, rounded.

‘Orchid’

Morris Arb. Bull. 16: 46, 1965

(M. liliiflora × M. stellata). Hillenmeyer Nurseries, Lexington, KY, 1961. Shrubby, symmetrical habit. Leaves obovate; acuminate tip, revolute edges, about the size and shape of M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexandrina’. Flowers red purple, showy.

‘Orchid Beauty’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 174, 1994

M. ×soulangeana (M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’ × M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’). Introduced 1966. Short branching habit. Flowers large, light purple, everblooming.

‘Oriental Charm’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag 63: 23, 2012

(M. officinalis × M. obovata). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers creamy white, fragrant, opening late afternoon. Moderate seed fertility.= M. ‘Magnolia Charm’

‘Oriental Night’

Zymon Nursery website. http://www.zymon.pl. Accessed 6 April 2018

M. ×soulangeana. Apparently of Chinese origin. To 3 m in height. Flowers very dark, large. Eisenhut website (as of 2019) listed as M. ×soulangeana selection. Potentially a backcross with M. liliiflora.

‘Osaka’

Magnolia 20(2) [Issue 38]: 18, 1985

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. liliiflora). Shrub to 2 m in height. Flowers purple; almost black in bud. May to July. Treseder (1978) listed this selection as ‘Osaka’, but mentions ‘Sarasa’ was the name for this form in Japan per K. Wada, with Osaka as the district from which it was received. McDaniel (1978) notes this was in reference to the clone depicted by Keisuke Ito in Figures and Descriptions of Plants in the Koishikawa Botanical Garden 1:fig 10 (1883), but that the description (when translated) references a small-flowered “strain”, and further disagrees with the illustration based on tepal color. I find McDaniel’s description somewhat confusing and have not been able to view the actual plate. At least one source depicts “pale, rosy-lilac” colored flowers which are inconsistent with the dark purple flowers generally associated with the clone. Fogg and Del Tredici (1984) registered this cultivar as ‘Osaka’ based on Treseder’s description, but do not mention the epithet ‘Sarasa’. ‘Sarasa’ may be a better epithet if an earlier print citation from the Japanese literature can be located, and/or if this cultivar epithet is referencing multiple selections. At this time, ‘Osaka’ is retained as the accepted epithet for this cultivar.= M. ‘Sarasa’

‘Oscar’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018. (‘Big Dude’ × ‘Big Dude’). Koen Camelbeke, Haacht, Belgium. One of his first crosses, and per communication in 2019 “nothing special and should be ignored all together”.

‘Osprey’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 58: 16-20, 2007

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × M. sargentiana). Hybridized by Tim Thornton, England. Flowers large, clear shade of pink.

‘Ossie’s Yellow’

Magnolia Grove website. http://www.magnoliagrove.co.nz/index.php/nz-raised-magnolia-collection. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

M. ×brooklynensis (M. ×brooklynensis × M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’). Os Blumhardt, New Zealand. Flowers yellow, precocious.

‘Ovata’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 105, 1916

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Overbecks’

Burncoose Nurseries website. http://www.burncoose.co.uk. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

M. campbellii. In reference to a spectacular tree at Overbecks, Cornwall, England. Pink flowered-form, uncertain as to difference from type. Has been distributed by Eisenhut, and propagated by seed at garden of Overbeck’s.

‘Overton’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 20, 1989

M. grandiflora. Selected by Robbins Nursery, Willard, NC. Provisionally accepted pending description.

‘Oxoniensis Flore Duplex’

Bosse, Vollst. Handb. Blumeng., Ed. 2, 2: 465, 1841

M. grandiflora. See ‘Exmouth’.

‘Oxoniensis’

Baumann, Cat. p. 26. 1842, Bollwiller & Mulhouse, France

M. grandiflora. Leaves cinnamon-brown underneath. Flowers double. Almost constantly flowering from March to November. See ‘Exmouth’.

‘Oyama Rose’

Magnolia 51(1) [Issue 99]: 30, 2016

(M. sieboldii var. sieboldii ‘Colossus’ × M. insignis ‘Anita Figlar’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid, raised and selected by Dick Figlar, Pickens, SC, USA. Shrub-like tree ca 3 × 4 m in seven years. Flowers as M. sieboldii but pigmented pink on outer two rows of tepals, and upright to out-ward facing (not pendant). Flowering late spring produced continuously for six weeks. Foliage intermediate between parent species.

‘Painters Palette’

(‘Sunsation’ × ‘Pink Charm’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI (Tom Trzebiatowski Jr., pers. comm., 2017). Characteristics uncertain. Unpublished name.

‘Pale Pink Seedling’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 4, circa 1973, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. campbellii. Flowers very large, blush pink. Likely member of Raffillii Group.

‘Paliside Pink’

Gossler Farms Nursery retail catalog, p. 22, 2019-2020

Pink-purple flowers, from Paliside, CO at 1430 m elevation. Hardy. Listed as “Pallaside Pink”, likely a spelling error. Other variations may include ‘Palisades Pink’, ‘Palisade Peach’, and ‘Pallaside Peach’.

‘Palmberg’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 84, 1994

M. macrophylla. Introduced by Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA. Flowers larger than the species.

‘Parson’s Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 8, circa 1973, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. grandiflora. Large-flowered form with abnormally broad tepals.

‘Parson’s Clone’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

‘Kewensis’ type with showy, fragrant flowers, apparently larger than similar selections. Not established. Proposed epithet was already in use for a M. grandiflora selection.

‘ParCind’

Paradise Plants website, http://paradiseplants.com.au, Accessed 20 July 2021

Bob Cherry and John Robb, Paradise Plants, Kariong, New South Wales, Australia, before 2016. Floriferous selection with creamy-white flowers and evergreen foliage. Apparently, a hybrid involving M. laevifolia. Marketed as PRINCESS CINDERELLA.

‘ParCleo’

Paradise Plants website, http://paradiseplants.com.au, Accessed 20 July 2021

Bob Cherry and John Robb, Paradise Plants, Kariong, New South Wales, Australia, before 2016. Flowers creamy white with pink blush, fragrant. Website lists as hybrid, photos show clear M. figo influence but no parentage is given. Per Luc De Jonge (unpublished data, 2020), the parentage is “ figo × “mag parperfect” [sic]”, presumably indicating a hybrid between M. figo and M. laevifolia ‘ParPerfect’ (‘Paradise Perfection’). Marketed as PRINCESS CLEOPATRA.

‘ParPerfect’

M. laevifolia. Unpublished name. Based on the naming convention (compare ‘ParCind’, ‘ParCleo’), this is presumably an introduction by Bob Cherry, Paradise Plants, Kariong, New South Wales, Australia, and probably the same clone listed but not described by Callaghan and Png (2013) as M. laevifolia ‘Paradise Perfection’. De Jonge, (unpublished data, 2015) lists “Paradise Perfection” as a Cherry introduction, floriferous with a compact habit and dense foliage. Bryant (2016) describes “Paradise Perfection” as originating at least in part from one of Cherry’s plant-hunting expeditions to Yunnan, China. The selection does not currently appear on the Paradise Plants website under either epithet, and the introducer’s preferred epithet is uncertain.

‘ParStar’

Magnolia 46(1) [Issue 89]: 27, 2011

M. laevifolia. Appears in the above article as ‘Par Star’, described only as a New Zealand or Australian origin Michelia type. Based on the naming convention, this would appear to be an introduction by Bob Cherry, Paradise Plants, Kariong, New South Wales, Australia. Most likely the same clone as “Paradise Starlight” described by Bryant (2016) as white flowered selection originating from one of Cherry’s plant-hunting expeditions to Yunnan, China.

‘Paradise Perfection’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook, p. 52, 2013

Probably a trade designation for ‘ParPerfect’, though uncertain which epithet is preferred by the introducer. See ‘ParPerfect’.

‘Parviflora’

van Houtte, Cat. #265: 112. 1896, Ghent, Belgium.

M. grandiflora. Erroneously cites a figure: The Garden of 8 December 1893, not found. Probably = M. acuminata ‘Maxima’. As cultivar of “M. maxima”.

‘Pastel Beauty’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 17, 2000

(M. acuminata × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Spreading tree, ca 6 m in 10 years. Flowers light pink with yellow undertones, generally emerging after the last spring frost.

‘Pastel Sunset’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(‘Rose Marie’ × ‘Blushing Belle’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Late-season. = M. ‘Coral Sunset’.

‘Pat’s Delight’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(M. campbellii × M. liliiflora). Os Blumhardt, New Zealand. Flowers pure white. Sister seedling of ‘Star Wars’.

‘Patriot’

Magnolia 27(1) [Issue 51]: 26, 1991

M. acuminata var. acuminata (Open-pollinated seedling of M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’). Selected by August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Leaves larger than the parent and twigs larger in diameter. Believed to be an octoploid (152 chromosomes) based on morphological characteristics, though flow cytometery work by Parris (2011) suggest this is likely a tetraploid (as typical of the species) and induction of polyploidy was unsuccessful.

‘Patty’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(‘David Clulow’ × ‘Leda’). Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. Unregistered and still under evaluation as of Jan 24, 2019, per Koen Camelbeke, but listed on Piet Vergeldt Nursery website (magnoliastore.com) as early as 2018. Flowers large, pure white, and emerging late in season escaping frosts.

‘Paul Cook’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 52, 2011

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × unnamed seedling of M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Frank Galyon, Knoxville, TN. Upright, vigorous tree more robust than either parent. Flowers lavender-pink on exterior and white within. To 28 cm diameter, 6-9 tepals. Flowers fertile.

‘Peaches and Cream’

Whitman Farms website. http://www.whitmanfarms.com/. Accessed 15 Dec 2013

(‘Star Wars’ × M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers with six tepals, peachy-pink towards base and white towards apex. Late-season, avoiding many spring frosts. Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (magnoliastore.com) lists ‘Peaches ‘n Cream’ as a provisional name.

‘Peachy’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 25, 1994

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. sprengeri). Phil Savage hybrid selected by Richard B. Figlar, Pomona, NY. Fast growing, fastigiate tree (compare ‘Wada’s Memory) to 8 × 4 m in in 15 years. Flowers orange/red on outer surface, creamy white on inner surface, giving the appearance of a mottled peach. 9 tepals, ca 13 × 5 cm. Flowering about the same time as M. fraseri. Fragrance pleasant. Flowers somewhat floppy. Sister seedling of ‘Barbara Nell’.

‘Pearl’

Gossler Farms Nursery retail catalog, p. 23, 2015-2016

See ‘Pickard’s Pearl’.

‘Pearl’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 685, 2009

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Head-Lee Nursery, Seneca, SC. Floriferous.

‘Pegasus’

Magnolias and Their Allies, p. 18, 1998

(M. cylindrica × M. denudata). Henry Foundation, Gladwyne, PA. Large shrub or multi-stemmed tree, vase-shaped at first, later spreading and developing a crown as broad as high. To 3-5 m height. Leaves thicker in texture compared to typical M. cylindrica, closer in shape to M. denudata. Flowers with 3 small outer tepals, 6 inner tepals white suffused purplish pink towards the base, approximately 10 cm in length, similar in shape to M. denudata but more slender.

‘Peirce’s Park’

Magnolia 33(2) [Issue 64]: 1-14, 1998

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Very large tree at Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square, PA, true to descriptions of M. acuminata var. subcordata in terms of flower color and stem pubescence. Type tree fell due to ice damage in 2020 but has been repropagated and distributed.

‘Pelton’

Arb. Bull. Univ. Wash. 22: 127, 1959

See M. ×soulangeana ‘Verbanica’.

‘Peppermint Ice’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Hardy tree. Pink flowers with white inner tepals.

‘Peppermint Stick’

Gresham, Morris Arb. Bull. 13: 48. 1962

(M. liliiflora × M. ×veitchii). Gresham hybrid. Flowers white; base-violet, midribs of tepals striped, inner tepals upright; outer tepals reflexed.

‘Perdido’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. virginiana var. australis. Introduced by Tom Dodd III, Semmes, Alabama, USA. Upright habit. Leaves tiny, <5 cm in length. Twigs pubescent. One of five small leaved selections by Tom Dodd III (See also: ‘Apalachee’, ‘Cahaba’, ‘Coosa’, and ‘Tensaw’). Uncertain as to distinctions between selections.

‘Peregrine’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(M. campbellii ‘Betty Jessel’ × M. ×soulangeana). Tim Thornton.

‘Perry Paige’

United States Patent #17814, 2007

M. virginiana var. australis. Selected by George L. Dodson III and Fernando Campbell Boyd III, McMinnville, TN. Dwarf. Leaves a lighter shade of green and narrower than typical for species. Cold tolerant to at least -10 F. Marketed as SWEET THING®.

‘Persian Plum’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. stellata. Flowers purple-pink, 32 tepals.

‘Peter Borlase’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 16, 1992

M. campbellii (Open-pollinated seedling of M. campbellii). A Seedling originating at Lanhydrock Gardens, Cornwall, England, selected by Peter Borlase, Head Gardener. Named and introduced by David Clulow, Surrey, England, 1989. Flowers smaller than M. campbellii, to 10 × 8 cm. 9-12 broadly spatulate to oblong-ovate tepals, to ca 10 × 6 cm.

‘Peter Dummer’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 26, 2005

(M. campbellii ‘Darjeeling’ × ‘Pegasus’). Selected by Jim Gardiner of RHS Wisley from seedlings raised by Peter Dummer, 2003. Flowers unusual deep rose, inner surface of tepals creamy white, outer surface overlaid with deep reddish-pink at the base to paler pink at the apex, but with a darker midrib; overall impression of flower color is dark pink. Inner whorl of 3-4 tepals clawed at base; outer whorl not clawed.

‘Peter Smithers’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

(M. ×veitchii × M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’). Gresham hybrid (”JG#9”, “LA#49”, “G66#48”). Leaves large. Flowers to 25 cm diameter. 9 broad tepals. Reddish stamens and gynoecium.

‘Peter Veitch’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 285, 2000

M. ×veitchii. Per Gardiner (2000), one of the six seedlings from the original cross of M. denudata × M. campbellii performed at the Royal Nurseries of Peter C. M. Veitch in 1907. This selection and ‘Isca’ were the only two retained. Mid-large-sized tree, compare ‘Isca’ but more vigorous and upright, and with pink flowers.= M. ×veitchii ‘Veitchii’

‘Petit Chicon’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 23-24, 2005

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). Selected from Karl Flinck’s Garden in Bjuv, Sweden (#1636) by Koen Camelbeke and Philippe de Spoelberch of Arboretum Wespelaar. Presumed to originally have been hybridized by Phil Savage. Flowers with green sepaloid tepals to 5 × 1.5 cm, and six canary yellow petaloid sepals to 9 × 5 cm, overall appearing yellow.

‘Petit Form’

Esveld Nursery website, http://www.esveld.nl/, Accessed 10 Jan 2019

M. tripetala. No indication as to difference from type, but presumably smaller in stature. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958. Maybe = ‘Petite’.

‘Petite’

M. tripetala. Seeds from a plant carrying this name were distributed via the Magnolia Society International Seed Counter before 2010 (Jack Johnston, pers. comm.), and seedlings from those resultant plants were further sold and distributed as M. tripetala ‘Petite’ throughout the 2010s (e.g. by Mail-Order Natives, Lee, FL, ca 2010-2011). Presumably a dwarf form. Maybe = M. tripetala ‘Petit Form’, but difficult to determine such without knowledge of origin. Without description of specific characteristics and whether seedlings carrying this name exhibit those characteristics, should not be established as a cultivar. Not published.

‘Petite Royal Whisper’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

Dennis Ledvina and Roy G. Klehm. To 3 × 2.5 m in 10 years. Flowers purple, 12 cm, 6 tepals. Slightly fragrant.

‘Pévé Paula’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

M. ×soulangeana. Dwarf form, from witches’-broom of ‘Rustica Rubra’.

‘Phelan Bright’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 224, 1994.

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid selected by Tina Durio, Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA, 1992. Upright and spreading with a single trunk. Flowers clear white, to 35 cm diameter. 12 tepals. Fragrant, and flowering later than most Gresham hybrids.

‘Phil Marino’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 685, 2009

M. grandiflora. Upright, conical.

‘Phil Savage’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 685, 2009

M. grandiflora. Bob Adams. From a plant found in Southern Ohio. Leaves large, glossy, light green. Stem growth remains green for two years. Cold hardy. Was commercially available through Simpson’s Nursery, Vincennes, IN.

‘Phil’s Masterpiece’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 19, 2001

(M. acuminata × M. campbellii). Phil Savage. Flowers exterior deep rose pink, interior lighter pink. To 25 cm diameter. Moderate seed and excellent pollen fertility. Cup-and-saucer form.

‘Philip Tregunna’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 31, 1998

(M. sargentiana × M. campbellii). Selected by F. J. Williams, Esq. at Caerhays Castle, England, 1991. Height and spread to 15 m in 38 years. Very vigorous, with large leaves similar to those of campbellii. Flowers reddish purple outside and pale pink inside.

‘Philo’

Langford, Check List of the Cultivated Magnolias, p. 3-4, 1994

M. acuminata var. acuminata. J. C. McDaniel, Urbana, IL. Highly self-compatible, produces a large crop of viable seeds. Original tree on John F. Keeler Farm, Philo, IL.

‘Phyllis Barrow’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 603, 1998

M. grandiflora. Michael Dirr. Athens, GA. Leaves dark green with orange-brown indumentum. Some distribution as ‘Dearing Street’. = M. grandiflora ‘Dearing Street’; = M. grandiflora ‘Deering Street’

‘Pia’s Favorite’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

Günther Nograsek. Seedling from a M. campbellii hybrid. Narrow, upright. Flowers pink outside, white inside.

‘Pickard’s Amethyst’

Lunaplant nursery website, http://www.lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 Jan 2019

M. ×soulangeana (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’). Flowers white to pale pink with dark pink base, especially on inner tepals.

‘Pickard’s Brozzonii’

Pickard, Magnolia Gardens, Price List, Autumn 1966, Canterbury, England

See M. ×soulangeana ‘Brozzonii’.

‘Pickard’s Charm’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Tidy, upright tree. Small leaves. Flowers a good full pink. Medium-sized, tulip-shaped. Fragrant.

‘Pickard’s Coral’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers white spotted pink, giving a pink effect. Tulip-shaped. Fragrant.

‘Pickard’s Cornelian’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers goblet-shaped, dark wine red-purple.

‘Pickard’s Crystal’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers goblet-shaped, ivory white, basal portion with a purplish-pink flush.

‘Pickard’s Firefly’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers goblet-shaped, deep wine purple-red. Fragrant.

‘Pickard’s Garnet’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers darker than ‘Lennei’, fragrant. Generally goblet-shaped, occasionally boat-shaped resulting from a twin pistil and extra tepals. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Garnet’

‘Pickard’s Glow’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers wine-red, fading to white. Fragrant. Occasionally with twin pistils and extra tepals.

‘Pickard’s Maime’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Goblet-shaped flowers. Compare ‘Picture’, but with slightly deeper color and broader tepals. Fragrant.

‘Pickard’s Opal’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers white, slight basal purple-pink veining. Flowers goblet-shaped.= M. ×soulangeana ‘Opal’

‘Pickard’s Pearl’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers white, flushed with rose. Fragrant. Flowers goblet-shaped. = M. ‘Pearl’

‘Pickard’s Pink Diamond’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Leaves rough. Flowers pastel pink on white. Fragrant. Broad-tepaled, tulip-shaped.

‘Pickard’s Rose Superb’

Pickard, Magnolia Gardens Price List, Autumn 1966, Canterbury, England

M. ×soulangeana. Flower deep pink. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Rose Superbe’

‘Pickard’s Ruby’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers goblet-shaped, deep full, wine or purple-red in UK (in Switzerland, a deeper color.). Fragrant.= M. ‘Ruby’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Ruby’

‘Pickard’s Schmetterling’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Leaves rough. Flowers wine-red. Fragrant. Unusually elongated, narrow-tepaled flowers.

‘Pickard’s Snow Queen’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers pure white with no vinous color. Larger and bolder than ‘Lennei Alba’.

‘Pickard’s Stardust’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18, 1984

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. kobus). Leaves long, brittle, bronzed. Flowers white, small; narrow with upright tepals. Very fragrant. Robinson (2003) lists a ‘Stardust’, probably a synonym. = M. ‘Stardust’

‘Pickard’s Sundew’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 244, 1994

Introduced 1969. Vigorous. Flower white, flushed base, to 25 cm diameter. Believed to be a seedling of M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’; potentially pollinated by M. campbellii.

‘Picotee’

Grimshaw and Bayton, New Trees, 2008, p. 490

M. ×foggii. Tepals white with red-purple edges. Less hardy than ‘Jack Fogg’ or ‘Allspice’.

‘Picture’

Wada, Jap. Gard. Treas. p. 36, circa 1925, Hakoneya Nurseries, Numazu-Shi, Japan

M. ×soulangeana. Selected by K. Wada from a cultivated plant in the garden of Kaga Castle, Kanazawa, Japan. Flowers large, dark black-purple on the exterior, white on the interior. Thick texture and substance. Treseder (1978) suspected this may represent an older cross of M. denudata × lilliflora of eastern origin prior to the introduction of either species into western cultivation. For Smithers (1979), M. campbellii parentage is evident due to the large size of the flowers, a view that K. Wada apparently came to agree with later in life. 2n=[ca. 7.5x]=143 per Callaway (1994).= M. denudata ‘Wada’s Picture’

‘Picture Superba’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 698, 2009

M. ×soulangeana (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’). K. Wada. Commercially available by Treseders ca 1977 (see Smithers, 1979). Dirr (2009) describes flowers as large, white. Uncertain as to differences from sister seedling ‘White Giant’.

‘Piet Van Veen’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 116, 2000

M. campbellii. Distinctly colored. British clone.

‘Pink’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, p. 377, 1942

M. stellata. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See M. stellata ‘Rosea’.

‘Pink’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 688, 2009

M. kobus. Flowers pink. Foliage attractive per Dirr (2009). See discussion under M. kobus ‘Pink Kobus’

‘Pink Alba’

Langford, Check List of the Cultivated Magnolias, p. 77, 1994

M. ×soulangeana, Sold under this name by Hess’ Nurseries, Wayne, NJ, ca 1963. See ‘Pink Alba Superba’.

‘Pink Alba Superba’

Wister, Swarthmore Plant Notes, Ed. 3, 1 (1): 87, 1955-56

M. ×soulangeana. Compare M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba’, but flowers deep pink. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Pink Superba’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Pink Alba’

‘Pink Axelle’

M. globosa. Botanic Treasures, Hoogboom, Belgium, ca 2017. Pink rim to inner tepals, ca 12 tepals total (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020).

‘Pink Beauty’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

Commercially available prior to 2011. Flowers pale pink, many tepals. Floriferous from a young age.

‘Pink Buddha’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 67]: 1-13, 2000

M. delavayi. Seedling selected by Kunming Botanic Gardens ca 2000. Distinguished from type based on light pink inner tepals and green to pinkish-green outer tepals.

‘Pink Butterfly’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘Big Dude’ × ‘Vulcan’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Upright tree. Flowers 15 cm diameter, bright pink, opening wide.

‘Pink Cameo’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 19, 2001

(M. ×veitchii ‘Helen Fogg’ × ‘Northstar’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA, 2001. Flowers bright pink outside, lighter pink inside, 12 tepals. Fair seed and excellent pollen fertility. Persistently upright flowers; tepals with inwardly cupping tips.

‘Pink Charm’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘Pink Surprise’ × ‘Daybreak’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Fastigiate, To 5 × 2.5 m in 10 years. Flowers rose-pink outside, medium pink inside. Late flowering. Sister seedling of ‘Rose Marie’.

‘Pink Cloud’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 691, 2009

M. ×loebneri. Dirr (2009) mentions as being listed in the RHS Plant Finder. Junker’s Nursery was selling in 2019. Tepals with pink exterior, and near pure white interior. Compare ‘Leonard Messel’, but with more prominent stamens.

‘Pink Delight’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 19, 2001

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexandrina’ × ‘Galaxy’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. To 9 × 6 m in 10 years. Flowers lavender-pink. Extremely seed and pollen fertile. Very fragrant.

‘Pink Flanell’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘Atlas’ × ‘Big Dude’). Michael Gottschalk. Flowers pale pink, very large, cup shaped. Tree 6-8 m. “Flanell” is an older German spelling for “flannel” and may have been intended, but the cultivar epithet appears to have been intentionally published in English, so may have been in error. Provisionally accepted as ‘Pink Flanell’ pending clarification from introducer. = M. ‘Nexus’.

‘Pink Flush’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland.

M. obovata. Outside of tepals with slight pink flush. Probably the clone grown at Wisley in the 1950s.

‘Pink Form’

Gardiner, Magnolias, p. 133, 1989

M. obovata. Gardiner (1989) lists as winner of Royal Horticultural Society Award of Merit. See also J RHS Vol XCVI Aug 1971 pt 8, p. 337 “The Crown Estate Commissioners received the Award of Merit for the pink form of Magnolia officinalis which makes a huge tree and bears flowers so heavily scented that they hardly bear smelling at close quarters. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘Pink Fruity’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘JURmag1’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Deep Purple Dream’). Michael Gottschalk, Germany. Compare ‘Antje Zandee’ (sister seedling), but less vigorous, and with smaller yet very fragrant flowers.

‘Pink Goblet’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 2, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

(M. soulangeana × M. ×veitchii). Gresham hybrid (G66#12). Flowers large, pale pink, cup-shaped.

‘Pink Halo’

Magnolia 33(1) [Issue 63]: 31, 1998

M. virginiana var. virginiana. Selected by Richard B. Figlar, Pomona, NY. Flowers similar to the typical var. virginiana, but with a pale pink-colored ring at the bottom of the tepals, best seen on the inside of the tepals. An open-pollinated seedling from a disjunct population of this species in Gloucester, MA.

‘Pink Heaven’

([M. acuminata × ‘Galaxy’] × ‘Daybreak’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Compare ‘Daybreak’, but more fertile (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2015). Uncertain as to extent of distribution.

‘Pink Ice’

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Koban Dori’ × ‘Genie’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Upright. Clear pink flowers. Per Lennarth Jonsson, offered 2020 by Bielicki Nursery, Poland (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020).

‘Pink Kobus’

Burncoose Nurseries website. http://www.burncoose.co.uk. Accessed 8 Mar 2018; lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019.

M. kobus. Possibly referencing up to four forms of dubious cultivar status. Listed as a nomen nudum on the Burncoose website. On the Lunaplant website, it is listed as a “Kehr hybrid” with white flowers with a dark pink base to tepals. This matches the description of a M. kobus with pink tepal bases grown by Phil Savage listed by Heerdegen and Eisenhut (2019). A pink flowering M. kobus also grows at Arboretum Bokrijk, Genk, Belgium. Dirr (2009) also lists a ‘Pink’. Pink coloration to tepal bases is uncommon but occurs in M. kobus. Several such accessions at The Morton Arboretum (Lisle, IL) were erroneously labeled as Magnolia stellata ‘Rosea’ prior to 2016 and appear true to the description of M. kobus based on tepal shape, count, and overall habit.

‘Pink Nightie’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 16, 1992

(M. obovata × M. fraseri). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI, 1979. Straight, symmetrical tree with shiny red-brown twigs. Leaves comparable but smaller than M. fraseri. Flowers tall, vase-shaped. Pale pink tepals, satiny texture. Strong fragrance, very pleasant in early evening.

‘Pink Parasol’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers large, pink.

‘Pink Parchment’

Fairweather Gardens nursery catalog, p. 64, 2008

M. zenii. Flowers white/pink. Fragrant. Potentially a hybrid per Grimshaw and Bayton (2009).

‘Pink Perfection’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 17, 2000

M. ×loebneri (‘Encore’ × “Encore’). August Kehr, 1987. Slow growing, bushy, floriferous tree. Flowers lilac-pink, more pink coloration in cooler weather. 42-48 tepals.

‘Pink Petticoats’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook, p. 183;187, 2011

M. globosa. Flowers flushed pink. Cultivated at the Pine Lodge in Cornwall, England. Uncertain as to degree of propagation and distribution.

‘Pink Pom Poms’

(M. kobus ‘Pink Kobus’ ×M. ×brooklynensis ‘Black Beauty’). Tom Trzebiatowski Jr., USA. Flowers uniform pink, many tepals floppy. Uncertain as to degree of distribution.

‘Pink Princess’

lunaplant.de website. http://www.lunaplant.de/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. ×soulangeana. Dwarf, to 3-4 m height and 2.5 m spread.

‘Pink Promise’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘Amethyst Flame’ × ‘Genie’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Compact tree, flowers pinkish purple with blush pink to white interior. Some reblooming in mid-late summer. Perhaps a trade designation (See ‘MGPRO2008’), though a trademark does not appear to be claimed so may be freely available for use as a cultivar epithet. Provisionally accepted. = M. ‘MGPRO2008’.

‘Pink Pyramid’

KiwiFlora website, http://kiwiflora.com, Accessed 9 December 2019

(‘Aurora’ × ‘Genie’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. From a cross in 2007. Upright to fastigiate tree, flowers red-purple to dark pink. Second flush of flowers typically following in summer. Potentially intended as a trade designation for ‘MGPIN2010’, though currently does not appear to be claimed as a trademark so may be available for use as a cultivar epithet. Provisionally accepted. = M. ‘MGPIN2010’.

‘Pink Royalty’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow retail catalog, p. 9, 2005

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Dark Diva’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Flowers pink, highly double, up to 16 tepals.

‘Pink Sensation’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Pegasus’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Previously known as ‘Ian’s Giant Pink’.

‘Pink Stardust’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 160, 1994

M. stellata. Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA. Flowers light pink. 40-50 tepals.

‘Pink Superba’

Sunset Western Garden Book, Ed. 3, p, 334, 1967

M. ×soulangeana. See ‘Pink Alba Superba’.

‘Pink Surprise’

Magnolia 30(1) [Issue 57]: 30, 1995

(‘Spectrum’ × [M. acuminata × M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’]). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Small tiny buds which open to large, bright pink flowers. Prolonged flowering period (up to one month) due to profusion of secondary flower buds.

‘Pink Tilkin’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

Though both names are in use, ‘Miranja’ is Jef Van Meulder’s preferred epithet per Luc De Jonge in 2020. See ‘Miranja’.

‘Pink Tipped Form’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 9, 2000

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958. Appears in an article by Kalleberg (2000), likely the same selection he later named ‘Min Pyong-gal’.

‘Pink Waterlily’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. stellata. Shrubby habit, flowers clear pink, 32 tepals.

‘Pinkie’

Dudley & Kosar, Morris Arb. Bull. 19: 27. 1966

(M. liliiflora ‘Reflorescens’ × M. stellata ‘Rosea’). U.S. National Arboretum introduction. Flowers from red-purple buds, large, to 18 cm diameter. 9-12 tepals, red-purple with white interior. Late-season. Namesake uncertain, presumably a nickname.

‘Pinkish-white Buddha’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 67]: 1-13, 2000

M. delavayi. Seedling selected by Kunming Botanic Gardens ca 2000. Compare ‘Pink Buddha’, but inner tepals closer in color to species.

‘Pioneer’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 326, 1996

M. grandiflora. Selection from Oregon City, OR. Compare ‘Victoria’, in form and hardiness, but shrubbier overall, leaves less dark and less pubescent, and flowering one month earlier.

‘Pirouette’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 50: 12, 1999

M. ×loebneri See ‘Mag’s Pirouette’.

‘Plantation No 5’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 685, 2009

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Plantation Tree Co., Selma, AL. Pyramidal. Compare ‘Claudia Wannamaker’ but broader. Per Article 21.19, this epithet could not be established due to use of #. Article 35.8 allows establishment if replaced with abbreviation “No”.

‘Plena’

RareFind Nursery catalog, p. 51, 2003

M. virginiana. Origin uncertain. Earliest flowers double, later-season flowers typically single. Also sold by Fairweather Gardens ca 2008. Not established. Article 21.11 prevents establishment of cultivar epithets entirely in Latin on/after 1 January, 1959. Likely a distinct origin from ‘Burchelliana’ and ‘Gordoniana’ which do not appear to have been maintained as clonal selections into the 21st century. Maybe = ‘Havener’, or a novel form.

‘Plena’

Future Gardens Garden Store website, https://www.futuregardens.pl/, Accessed 2019 Jan 10.

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii Semi-double. Uncertain if different than M. sieboldii ‘Semiplena’. Cannot be established due to use of Latin epithet after 1959.

‘Plum Pudding’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘Genie’ × ‘Sir Harold Hillier’). Vance Hooper. Flowers pale pink.

‘Poconos’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 326, 1996

M. grandiflora. Selected by Bruce Keyser from a plant in the Pocono Mountains. Leaves glossy, medium green, light pubescent. Hardy.

‘Polo de Lorenzo’

Whitman Farms website. http://www.whitmanfarms.com/allplants/ornamental-plants/magnolias/magnolia-x-polo-de-lorenzo/. 3 Feb 2018

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’). To 2.5 × 2.5 m in 25 years. Flowers large, to 30 cm diameter. Fragrant. Named for the former proprietor/owner of Sonoma Horticultural

Nursery.

‘Porcelain Dove’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 225, 1994

(M. globosa × M. virginiana var. australis). Hybrid by D. Todd Gresham, Santa Cruz, CA selected and introduced by Tom and Bill Dodd, Semmes, AL. Leaves much like those of M. virginiana, semi-evergreen. Flowers porcelain-white with red stamens. Larger than those of M. virginiana. Fragrant. Named in 1986, in honor of porcelain-white flower color and Todd Gresham’s home, Hill of Doves.

‘Port Wine’

forestfarm at Pacifica website. https://www.forestfarm.com/magnolia-figo-michelia-f-port-wine-mifi064. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

M. figo var. figo. Older than other M. figo selections. Sold by Live Oak Gardens, New Iberia, LA during the 1980’s per Bobby Green (pers. comm. 2019). Original introducer uncertain. Flowers with more purple blush than typical M. figo but not to the extent of M. figo var. crassipes per Mark Weathington (pers. comm. 2019). Callaghan and Png (2013) suggest this is actually the common name of the species.

‘Powder Puff’

Magnolia 27(1) [Issue 51]: 26, 1991

M. ×loebneri (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×loebneri ‘Ballerina’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, 1987. Flowers white. 18-25 tepals. Flowers similar to other M. ×loebneri selections, but the tepals tend to stand erect rather than lying flat.

‘PP7’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. ×soulangeana (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’). Flowers red-purple striped.

‘Praecox’

Cels, Cat. Arb. p. 23. 1817

M. grandiflora. Leaves oval-oblong. Early flowering, from end of May to late Autumn. Introduced from Paris about 1830.

‘Praecox du Grand Jardin’

A. & E. Kay, Pl World Fla. p. 33, 1933

M. grandiflora. Habit very dense, upright. Leaves large, strongly nerved, undulated, oblong-ovate, to ca 48 × 15 cm. Lower surface yellowish-brown. Flowers very large, fragrant.

‘Praecox du Mans’

Riedel, Pl. Extra-trop. Reg. 383, 384, 1957

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. Somewhat cultivated in the US, with records in 1961 by D. Todd Gresham and the University of California at Los Angeles.

‘Praecox Fastigiata’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 326, 1996

M. grandiflora (Open-pollinated seedling of M. grandiflora ‘Praecox’). Introduced by Kingsville Nursery, MD, ca 1961. Narrowly upright. = M. grandiflora ‘Fastigiata Praecox’; = M. grandiflora ‘Kingsville Fastigiate’

‘Praecox Pyramidata’

Nehrling, My Garden in Fla. p. 104, 1944

M. grandiflora. Upright, pyramidal. Leaves comparable to ‘Praecox Du Grand Jardin’ but smaller and lighter green. Flowers very large.

‘Pravertiana’

Sprenger, Boll. R. Ort. Bot. Palerm. 1: 66, 1897

M. grandiflora. Small, pyramidal tree with erect branches. Leaves sub-auriculate, thick, ovate. Flowers white, rather small, with 9 tepals. Cultivated by Pravert of Padova, Italy from Seed in 1886.= M. grandiflora ‘Pravertii’

‘Pravertii’

Nehrling, My Garden in Fla. 1040 1944.

M. grandiflora. See ‘Pravertiana’.

‘Precoce des Nantes’

Gard. Chron. 66: 365; Fig. 165, 1929

M. grandiflora. Cultivated at Glasnevin, Dublin, Ireland. Nomen nudum. Probably = ‘Nannetensis’.

‘Premier Cru’

Millais Nurseries website, http://rhododendrons.co.uk, Accessed 1 Jun 2021

(M. sargentiana ‘Blood Moon’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Claret Cup’). Maurice Foster, Kent, England. Flowers bright but deep pink with contrasting paler center. Early flowering.

‘Pretty Pink’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Listed in this article as one of Baldick’s introductions, but characteristics uncertain.

‘Pride of Norway’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 20, 2001

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii (‘Genesis’ × ‘Genesis’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Multi-stemmed, bushy habit to 3 × 3m in 13 years. Flowers white, ca 13 cm diameter, 10-14 tepals. Functions well as a female parent in crosses with evergreen magnolias. Similar in appearance to ‘Colossus’. Tetraploid.

‘Prince Charming’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 709, 2009

Gresham hybrid selected by Louisiana Nurseries (LA#82). Flowers large, white, floppy. = M. ‘Floppy’

‘Princess Margaret’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 99: 273, 1974

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. campbellii). To 6 m in 16 years. Flowers red purple exterior, cream interior, to 28 cm diameter. Tepals to 13 × 8 cm. Compare ‘Charles Raffill’, but Deeper flower color with larger, less rounded tepals. Has been referred to as “Windsor Belle”.

‘Pristine’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 18-19, 1984

(M. stellata ‘Waterlily’ × M. denudata ‘Gere’). J. C. McDaniel. Flowers pure white. More tepals than denudata but retains the erect habit. Did not inherit much pink pigment from ‘Waterlily’.

‘PRN Select’

M. stellata. Selected by Rich Hesselein in the late 1980s from a block of seedling M. stellata at Crosswicks Farms. Precocious flowering, floriferous, and vigorous. Densely branched habit, ca 7 × 5 m in 30 years (R. Hesselein, pers. comm., 2020). Not commercially released.

‘Pseudokobus’

J. Phytogeogr. & Taxon. 34(1), 15-18, 1986

M. kobus. Triploid variant of M. kobus identified as a spontaneous plant in Japan. Fewer tepals, but broader compared to type. Named as a species by Kunihiko Ueda, based on a solitary specimen found in Tokushima Prefecture, Japan, 1948. As it is generally seen as a variant as opposed to a species, and has seen at least some cultivation, it is treated here as a cultivar. = M. ‘Kubushimodoki’

‘Pumila’

Nuttall, Amer. Jour. Sci. 5: 295, 1822

M. virginiana var. australis. Dwarf variety in East Florida, USA not exceeding three or four feet. A listing appears on Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (magnoliastore.com), but uncertain if this is the same plant.

‘Pure Joi’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 8-9, 2008

(M. champaca × M. baillonii). Selected by “Joi” Suchin Srikaseme, Phanom Sarakarm, Chacheung Sao, Thailand and named and introduced by Barry Yinger (Asiatica Nursery) in 2008. Large shrub or small tree. Leaves showy with yellow and cream variegation. Flowers white, fragrant.

‘Purpan’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

M. grandiflora. Dense, conical habit. Floriferous. Propagules from one of the largest M. grandiflora in Europe, on the grounds of the School D’ingénieurs De Purpan, Toulouse, France.

‘Purple’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed, 2, p. 376. 1942

M. liliiflora. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’.

‘Purple’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, p. 377. 1942

M. ×soulangeana. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’.

‘Purple Breeze’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 17-18, 2000

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. sargentiana). Philippe de Spoelberch, Belgium, from a plant purchased from Esveld in 1984 under the name M. sargentiana (var. robusta). To 7 m in 16 years. Flowers purple, becoming lighter as they open. 12-13 tepals, ca 12 × 5 cm). Early flowering: before M. sprengeri ‘Diva’ and ‘Charles Raffill,’ at the same time as ‘Leda.’

‘Purple Cracker’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Burncoose’ × ‘Vulcan’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. = M. ‘Purple Creaker’

‘Purple Creaker’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018.

Nomen nudum. See ‘Purple Cracker’.

‘Purple Dream’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 2, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. ×soulangeana. Nomen nudum. See ‘Deep Purple Dream’.

‘Purple Eye’

Hilliers Man. of Trees and Shrubs, Ed. 2. 1973

M. ×soulangeana. J. C. Williams, Caerhays Castle, England. Introduced by Robert Veitch and Sons. Flowers white with a purple flush on inside and outside of tepal base. Parentage long debated, with several theorizing as backcross with M. ×soulangeana. An octoploid (Richard Olsen and Stefan Lura, unpublished data, 2013), suggesting involvement from M. ×soulangeana. It is listed as such here, though specific parentage still inconclusive. First listed in Roy. Hort. Soc., Camellias And Magnolias, Conference Report, p, 102, 1950 (As ‘Purple-Eyed’).

‘Purple Globe’

Magnolias: A Care Manual, p. 114, 1999

M. ×soulangeana (M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Os Blumhardt, New Zealand, 1989. Flowers globe-shaped, medium purple-pink. Compare ‘Star Wars’. = M. ‘Purple Glow’

‘Purple Glow’

Magnolias: A Care Manual, p. 114, 1999

Frequent misnomer per Rankin (1999). See ‘Purple Globe’.

‘Purple Patch’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

M. biondii. Erland Ejder, Kang Yongxiang, and Yaling Wang selected 2008 from a wild population in Pingli, Shaanzi, China. Flowers with strong purple base, less floppy than typical cultivated M. biondii. Ejder considered this cultivar as belonging to Magnolia biondii var. purpurascens Y.L.Wang & S.Z.Zhang, Blumea 58: 33 (2013), an acceptable concept per Dick Figlar based on geographic isolation and morphological variation (pers. comm., 2021). However, the name of that lower taxon is illegitimate per Rafaël Govaerts (pers. comm., 2021) as it is a later homonym of Magnolia biondii f. purpurascens Y.W.Law & Z.Y.Gao, Bull. Bot. Res., Harbin 4: 192 (1984).

‘Purple Planets’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

Selected by Michael Gottschalk. Seedling of unknown Gresham hybrid. Flowers purple, cup-shaped.

‘Purple Platter’

Leafland nursery catalog, p. 95, 2015

(‘Iolanthe’ × M. soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’). Hybridized by Oz Blumhardt, New Zealand. Outer tepals pink, white interior.

‘Purple Prince’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 12(2): 3, 1976

M. ×soulangeana (M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Hybridized by Frank Galyon, Knoxville, TN. Flowers with the dark coloration of M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ on inner and outer surfaces. 6 tepals, ca 10 × 8 cm. Flowers globular, similar in shape to M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’.

‘Purple Princess’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 19, 1984

M. ×soulangeana (M. liliiflora ‘Darkest Purple’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Frank Galyon, Knoxville, TN. Flowers symmetrical, to 8 cm in height, nine tepals, no sepals. Compare ‘Darkest Purple’, but flowers darker and redder. Was initially registered as ‘Melanie’, but not published, and changed later at Dr. Galyon’s request.= M. ‘Melanie’

‘Purple Queen’

United States Patent #20060101551P1, 2006

M. figo var. crassipes. Selected by Akira Shibamichi, Kawaguchi City, Japan. Flowers dark red. Foliage darker than type.

‘Purple Rocket’

M. ×soulangeana. Introduced ca 2018. Large flowers, upright habit (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020). Unpublished name. Uncertain as to introducer or degree of distribution.

‘Purple Saucer’

Arb. Bull. Univ. Wash. 10 (4): 14, 1947

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers large, red-purple on the outside and pastel mauve on the inside. Probably = ‘Rustica Rubra’.

‘Purple Sensation’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56: 19-20, 2005

(M. liliiflora × M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Upright, flowering 3-4 years after planting. Flowers similar to ‘Lanarth’ but appearing later in season.

‘Purple Spotted’

USFS Fact Sheet ST-381, Magnolia macrophylla, October 1994

M. macrophylla. Flowers with purple markings in center. Probably not all that distinct from type.

‘Purple Star’

Magnolia 50(1) [Issue 97]: 22-23, 2015

(M. cylindrica ‘Bjuv’ × ‘Purple Breeze’). Philippe de Spoelberch, Belgium. Single leader with tendency towards fastigiate habit, to 6 × 4 m. Young leaves emerge purple-bronze. Firm, fragrant flowers dark red-purple outside, lighter inside, 20 cm diameter.

‘Purple Star Power’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

Dennis Ledvina and Roy Klehm. To 2 × 2 m in 10 years. Flowers purple outside, white inside. Slightly fragrant.

‘Purple and White’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 698, 2009

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers with purple exterior, white interior.

‘Purpliana’

Sawada, Natl. Hort. Mag. 29: 56. 1950

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers reddish-purple. 9 tepals. Early flowering. Plant cultivated at Overlook Nurseries, Crichton Station, Mobile, AL

‘Purpurascens’

Wada, Jap. Gard. Treas. p. 36, Hakoneya Nurs., Numazu-Shi, Japan, circa 1925

M. grandiflora. Flowers white, tinted pink at the base.

‘Purpurascens’

Stapf, Bot. Mag.152: T. 9116. 1927

M. sprengeri var. diva. See ‘Diva’.

‘Purpurascens’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018.

(M. denudata × ‘Diva’). See ‘Eternal Flames’.

‘Purpurea’

M. liliiflora. Flowers wholly purple outside, very deep purple towards the base of the petals. Larger than the type. Layritz, Arb. Bull. Univ. Wash. 10 (4): 11 (1947), says that it comes from China. W. B. Clarke, Arb. Bull. Univ. Wash. 11 (1): 23 (1948), says it is nothing but plain M. liliiflora.

‘Purpurea’

Madlinger, Bull. W. C. Paul Arb. 1, 1960

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers purple outside, creamy white inside. Per Wyman, Arnoldia 20: 28 (1960), Probably a name applied to mediocre seedlings.

‘PWS Pink’

Akira Shibimichi, Japan. Evergreen Michelia-type. Cultivated at Atlanta Botanical Garden – Gainesville, but flowers not pink (Ethan Guthrie, pers. comm, 2019).

‘Pygmaea’

Bosse, Vollst. Handb. Blumeng., Ed. 2, 2: 464. 1841

M. virginiana var. australis. Dwarf. Leaves evergreen; medium size, brownish beneath. Flowers large. Compare var. pumila. Uncertain as to the extent of cultivation.

‘Pyramidata’

Nehrling, My Garden in Fla. p. 103, 1944

M. grandiflora. Pyramidal, dense.

‘Qi Die’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

(‘Xinhanxiao’ × M. figo var. crassipes). Jing Wang, China, 2017. Compact, evergreen shrubby tree. Flowers white with pink base, fragrant, six tepals.

‘Qinfang Hanxiao’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook, p. 52, 2013

Chinese introduction. Evergreen, red flowers.

‘Qingxin’

Magnolia 53(2) [Issue 104]: 11, 2018

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Selected by Ya-ling Wang at Shenzhen Fairylake Botanical Garden, China, in 2001. Flowers with 15-25 tepals persisting into May or July (Shenzhen, China) with a fragance similar to Magnolia ×alba.

‘Quarry Wood’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 73: 266, Fig. 97, 1948

M. wilsonii. From seeds sent in 1939 from Armytyge Moore (”Rowallane,” Co. Down.) to W. Bentley (Quarry Wood). Was exhibited at Tree & Shrub Competition in Chelsea show circa 1948, with doubts cast over its identity as M. wilsonii. M. sinensis was growing nearby at Rowallane and suspected as the pollen parent. This plant is used as the illustration for M. wilsonii in Johnstone (1955). No evidence this plant saw a commercial release, and probably lost to cultivation.

‘Queen Caroline’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 19, 1984

M. campbellii. Flowers rich red-purple on the outside, paler inside when fully opened. To 23 cm diameter.

‘R. Veitch’

The Garden 93: 241, 1926

M. denudata. Flowers larger, rounder than type. Shown by Colonel Stephenson Clarke, Borde Hill Garden, West Sussex, England.

‘R20-1’

Magnolia 39(2) [Issue 76]: 11, 2004

(M. sieboldii × M. macrophylla). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Leaves large, elongate. Flowers pure white with ring of reddish stamens, ca 40 cm diameter. Distributed by Fairweather Gardens in the early 2000s. “R20-1” likely represents a tentative name for a selection which Dr. Kehr did not intend to introduce (Row 20, Plant 1). However, it has appeared in publication, was commercialized in a small way, and is commonly applied to the plant, so is accepted here as the de facto name for this plant.

‘Railway’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. laevifolia. Hardy selection. Not established as propagated without permission and named against wishes of introducer (Luc De Jonge, pers. comm., 2020).

Raffillii Group

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 125-128, 2000

M. campbellii. Hybrids of the western and eastern forms of M. campbellii (formerly recognized as var. campbellii and var. mollicomata, respectively) performed independently by Sir Charles Cave, Sidbury Manor, Devon, England ca 1920s and Charles Percival Raffill, Kew, England in 1946. Vigorous trees growing up to 60 cm per year. Flowers in the “cup and saucer” shape with 12 rose-pink tepals, fading to white on upper surfaces. Includes: ‘Charles Raffill’ (type), ‘Ann Jenkins’, ‘Dick Banks’, ‘Eric Walther’, Kew’s Surprise’, ‘Sidbury’, and ‘Wakehurst’.

‘Randy’

Dudley & Kosar, Morris Arb. Bull. 19: 28, 1968

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. stellata ‘Rosea’). U.S. National Arboretum introduction. Erect to columnar habit. Flowers red-purple and erect in bud, opening to cup-shaped flowers, ca 12 cm diameter, with 9-11 tepals ca 7 × 2 cm. Sterile triploid. U.S. Natl. Arb. #28346. Named for Randy de Vos.

‘Raspberry Fun’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 25, 1994

M. ×loebneri (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×loebneri ‘Leonard Messel’). Selected by Carl Ferris Miller, Korea, 1987. Compare ‘Leonard Messel’, but faster growing, branches more zigzagged, flowers darker, and more (to 16-18), wider tepals.

‘Raspberry Ice’

Gresham, Morris Arb. Bull. 13: 48, 1962

(M. liliiflora × M. ×veitchii). Gresham hybrid. Flowers bell-shaped, with a red-violet base, shading to white at the top. 12 tepals.

‘Raspberry Ripple’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

Large, cup-shaped flowers, raspberry-rose with stripe at the base.

‘Raspberry Swirl’

Magnolia 27(1) [Issue 51]: 26, 1991

(M. liliiflora ‘Darkest Purple’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Frank Galyon, Knoxville, TN. Multi-trunked tree. Flowers very dark purple. Average 11 tepals.

‘Raven’

Millais Nurseries website, https://www.rhododendrons.co.uk/, Accessed 10 Jan 2019

M. liliiflora. Selection from Korea. Fragrant.

‘Ravenswood’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide. p. 201, 2000

M. virginiana var. virginiana. Small, multi-stemmed, very fragrant. Selected from the Ravenswood Park Swamp between Gloucester and Manchester, MA, representing the northernmost spontaneous population.

‘Rebekka’s Perfume’

Burncoose Nurseries website. http://www.burncoose.co.uk. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Amabilis’ × ‘Mark Jury’). Michael Gottschalk, Germany. With slightly weeping side branches. Flowers large, star-shaped, white, with a pink blush to the exterior. Very fragrant.

‘Red’

Arnoldia 20: 26, 1960.

M. stellata. K. Sawada, Overlook Nurseries, Crichton Station, Mobile, Alabama, raised in 1946. Flowers with outside of tepals dark purplish red, inside white. To 10 cm diameter. Somewhat redder in color than M. stellata ‘Rubra’.

‘Red’

Plant Buyers Guide, Ed. 5, p 169. 1949

M. ×soulangeana probably = M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’, perhaps M. denudata ‘Sawada’s Pink.

‘Red As’

Duncan & Davies Nurseries catalog, p. 17, 2004

(‘Pickard’s Ruby’ × ‘Vulcan’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Upright, compact habit with purple-red flowers. Robinson (2005) lists the accepted epithet as ‘Red as Red’ with a note it was previously called ‘Red as’. However, a New Zealand Garden Journal article in 2013 (16(1):28) lists the selection as ‘Red as’, noting it is “sometimes incorrectly known as ‘Red as Red’. = M. ‘Red as Red’

‘Red as Red’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56: 20, 2005

See ‘Red As’.

‘Red Baron’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 20, 2001. [As ‘Red Barron’]

(M. acuminata × ‘Big Dude’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Compare ‘Big Dude’, but smaller, hardier, and with flowers deeper red in color.

‘Red Beauty’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 174, 1994

M. ×soulangeana (M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’ × M. lilliflora ‘Nigra’). Otto Spring, Okmulgee, OK, 1968. Tall tree, flowers nearly red.

‘Red Buddha’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 67]: 1-13, 2000

M. delavayi. Seedling selected by Kunming Botanic Gardens, China, ca 2000. Distinguished from type based on tepals colored pure red save for the base.

‘Red Eye’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Selected by Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Darker red stamens than type. Compact habit. Compare ‘South Korea’.

‘Red Flare’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(M. liliiflora × ‘Vulcan’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand, 1990. Flowers red-purple. Floriferous as a young plant.

‘Red Head’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 698, 2009

M. ×soulangeana. Large, reddish, cup-shaped flowers.

‘Red Lady’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘JURmag1’ × ‘Joe McDaniel’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Flowers bright reddish-pink. Vigorous.

‘Red Lion’

Burncoose Nurseries website. http://www.burncoose.co.uk. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

(M. campbellii × M. liliiflora). Compare ‘Star Wars’, but flowers larger and branches with drooping habit.

‘Red Lucky’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 53, 2011

M. ×soulangeana See ‘Hongjixing’, which translates to English as “lucky red star”.

‘Red Tip’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 685, 2009

M. grandiflora. Origin unknown. Per Dirr (2009), new growth bronzy-red.

‘Reder Than’

Newsletter of the American Magnolia Society, 14(2):24, 1978

Was registered by D. Todd Gresham, Santa Cruz, California, 3 Oct. 1966, but listed by McDaniel (1978b) as the former name of ‘Heaven Scent.’ See ‘Heaven Scent’.

‘Reflexa’

A. & E. Kay, Pl World Fla. 33. 1933

M. grandiflora. Dense. Older leaves reflexed and pointed, rusty-brown beneath. Flowers strongly lemon scented, inclined to double.

‘Reflorescens’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort.41: 141, 1916

M. liliiflora. Flowers dark purple, large. Reblooming August-September.= M. liliiflora ‘Louis Van Houtte’

‘Resembles’

Magnolien und Tulpenbäume, p. 124, 2019

Phil Savage cross selected by James Gossler, OR. Flowers pink at base, grading to white. 7-8 tepals, 12-15 cm. Appears to be a tentative name. Likely a sister seedling (if not synonym) of ‘Marjory Gossler’.

‘Richeneri’

Ellwanger & Barry, Descr. Cat. p. 35. 1886, Rochester, New York, USA

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers with soft purple exterior, small, abundant.

‘Ricki’

Dudley & Kosar, Morris Arb. Bull. 19: 29, 1968

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. stellata ‘Rosea’). U.S. National Arboretum introduction. Flowers red purple, emerging from slender erect buds. When open, flowers to ca 15 cm diameter, with 10-15 contorted tepals. Sterile triploid. U. S. Natl, Arb. #28347. Named for Ricki de Vos.

‘Ridgecrest Green’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 16, 1992

M. virginiana var. australis. Selected by Larry Lowman, Ridgecrest Nursery, Wynne, AR from a seedling purchased from Tom Dodd Nursery. Typical habit, to ca 5 × 2 m in 8-10 years. Hardy, flowers typical. Probably originated along the Gulf Coast of southern Alabama or Mississippi.

‘Riegel’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 685, 2009

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Tom Dodd, Jr., Alabama, USA. Compact. Compare ‘Little Gem’, but less fastigiate. Potential M. virginiana hybrid.

‘Ripples’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 685, 2009

M. grandiflora. Leaf margin wavy.

‘Riveting Rosie’

Cutting Edge Plants website, http://cuttingedgeplants.com, Accessed 28 March 2020.

(‘Colossus’ × insignis). Selected by Mike Dirr from a Dennis Ledvina cross. Introduced by Cutting Edge Plants ca 2018. Flowers resemble M. sieboldii but bright pink. Compare ‘Oyama Rose’. A trademark is claimed to this epithet, so it cannot be applied to this cultivar. The website also references ‘Seductive Pink’, but makes it clear this was a temporary name. A freely available cultivar epithet should be selected.

‘Riviera Moonrise’

Magnolia 52(2) [Issue 101]: 33, 2017

M. ×loebneri (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×loebneri ‘Merrill’). Selected by Patrick Vettling, Wyoming, MN. Floriferous. Flowers soft-pink, fading to white. 12 cm diameter, with 35 tepals 2 cm in width.

‘Roamer’

IDS Yearbook, p. 129, 2011

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × [Unlisted, maybe open pollinated]). Hybrid seedling from western China. Growing at Roamer House circa 2012.

‘Robert Barker’

Robert Barker, MO. Sold by RareFind Nursery, Jackson, New Jersey, USA ca 2007. Outer tepals yellow, inner tepals pink.

‘Rob Bayly’

Magnolia Grove website. http://www.magnoliagrove.co.nz/index.php/nz-raised-magnolia-collection. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

M. campbellii. Compare ‘Cook Splendour’, but flowers larger and with hint of purple.

‘Robert Reich’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 19, 1984

M. grandiflora. Leaves large, leathery, ca 45 × 15 cm. Flowers white, large.

‘Robert’s Dream’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 53: 22, 2002

M. ×proctoriana. Upright habit. Flowers pink, fading to white. Young leaves pale green with copper blush.

‘Robin’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 58: 16-20, 2007

(‘Star Wars’ × ‘Forrest’s Pink’). Hybridized by John Carlson, Gwent, Wales. Selected by Tim Thornton, England. Floriferous. Flowers deep pink towards tepal base, grading towards pale pink or white at apex.

‘Rogów’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018.

M. kobus. Tepals with stripe of pink-purple to outside. Originated as seeds from M. stellata rec’d from Cluj-Napoca Botanical Garden (Romania) but thought to be M. kobus.

‘Rohrbach’

Langford, Check List of the Cultivated Magnolias, p. 55, 1994

M. stellata. H. A. Hesse before 1960. Introduced into the United States by the U.S.D.A. (PI 265266). Flowers pink, with buds remaining pink at anthesis.

‘Romance’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘Pickard’s Sundew’ × ‘Vulcan’). Flowers cup-shaped, crinkled tepals, bright pink outer tepals with darker base.

‘Romina’s Pink’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018.

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’ × ‘Iolanthe’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Compared with ‘Rustica Rubra’, flowers darker, with white interior, and twice the size.

‘Rose’

Plant Buyers Guide, Ed. 5. 169. 1949

M. ×soulangeana See M. ×soulangeana ‘Rose’.

‘Round Leaf’

M. laevifolia. Compact leaves, rounded habit (Luc de Jonge, unpublished data, 2020). Uncertain as to origin or extent of distribution.

‘Rose King’

Burncoose & South Down Nurseries catalog, p. 40, 1988, Gwennap, Redruth, Cornwall

M. stellata. See ‘King Rose’.

‘Rose Marie’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

(‘Pink Surprise’ × ‘Daybreak’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Columnar, to ca 4 × 2.5 m in 10 years. Flowers vivid rose outside, medium pink inside. 9 tepals. Late season, flowering 1-2 weeks later than M. ×soulangeana and for as long as 1 month. Sister seedling of M. ‘Pink Charm’.

‘Rose Quartz’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × ‘Blushing Belle’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers pale pink. Narrow habit.

‘Rose Superbe’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. ×soulangeana. See ‘Pickard’s Rose Superb’.

‘Rosea’

S. Arnott, The Garden 55: 316. 1899

M. stellata. Flowers buds pink, flowers fade to white.= M. stellata ‘Pink’

‘Rosea’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 201, 1915

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers white with center carmine-red. Large. Fragrant (as M. denudata). = M. ×soulangeana ‘Rose’

‘Rosea’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. ×proctoriana. Photos depict flowers with 10 white tepals with pink base and pink stripe running ca halfway up midrib. Not established. Per article 21.11, cultivar epithets exclusively in Latin are prohibited after 1958.

‘Rosea F.V.’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. stellata. ”Rosea Fine Variety1”. See ‘Jane Platt’.

‘Rosea Grandiflora’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 12(6): 166, 1907

M. ×soulangeana. ‘Lennei’ seedling with large, pink and white flowers. For Pampanini, Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort.41: 141 (1916), this = M. liliiflora ‘Reflorescens’, though this is doubtful due to this selection’s reported origin as a ‘Lennei’ seedling.

‘Rosea Jane Platt’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. stellata. See ‘Jane Platt’.

‘Rosea Massey’

Pickard, Magnolia Gardens List, p, 10. 1970, Canterbury, Kent, England

M. stellata. Flowers white flushed rose.= M. stellata ‘Massy Rosea’

‘Roseanne’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

(M. liliiflora ‘O’Neill’ × M. kobus ‘Norman Gould’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Leaves semi-gloss with, heavy texture. Flowers with 6 or 7 tepals, rich lavender outside, lighter pink inside. Tepals very broad, retain upright form. Fertile tetraploid.

‘Rosemoor’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. grandiflora. Selected at Rosemoor Garden, Devon, England. Compact, smaller than type.

‘Rose of Sweden’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × M. cylindrica). Introduced 2014 by Erland Ejder and the Swedish Magnolia Group from the K. E. Flinck Magnolia Forest, Alnarp, Sweden. Large, multi-stemmed shrub. Flowers large, deep vivid pink, lacking purple tint. 12 petaloid tepals, no sepaloids.

‘Rosy Cheeks’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 16, 1992

M. ×wieseneri (M. obovata × M. ×wieseneri). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI, 1979. Straight, symmetrical, evenly branched tree, single leader; bark gray-brown twigs reddish-brown. Flowers pink, 8 white inner tepals, 4 rich pink outer tepals. Stamens crimson. Fragrance as M. ×wieseneri.

‘Rotundifolia Minor’

Bouche & Bouche, Blumenzucht 2: 716, 1855

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Rotundifolia’

Page, Page’s Prodromus p. 37, 1817, Southampton, England

M. grandiflora. Leaves round, very thick, ovate to rotund. Flowers globose before expanding. Cultivated by Cels, Cat. p. 23 (1817), in Paris, France.= M. grandiflora ‘Ferruginea-Praecox’; = M. grandiflora ‘Roundleaf’

‘Rouged Alabaster’

Gresham, Morris Arb. Bull. 13: 48, fig, 42. 1962

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii). Peduncles gray-villous, perules hirsute, dark brownish-black. Flowers rose-pink, flared to 30 cm diameter. Tepals 15 × 10 cm.

‘Roundleaf’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, p. 376, 1942

M. grandiflora. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See M. grandiflora ‘Rotundifolia’.

‘Rowan’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Ruby’ × ‘Early Rose’). John Carlson, Gwent, Wales, 2002. Flowers with 6 tepals. Color intermediate between parents.

‘Royal Alma’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Burncoose’ × ‘Vulcan’). Selected by Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers violet purple.

‘Royal Crown’

Gresham, Morris Arb. Bull. 13: 48, figs, 39-41. 1962

(M. liliiflora × M. ×veitchii). Flowers dark red-violet. Buds 14 × 5 cm. 12 tepals, the outermost reflexed, giving the effect of a crown.

‘Royal Flush’

Gresham, Morris Arb. Bull. 13: 48, 1962

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Flowers with inner tepal base dark red-violet.

‘Royal Purple’

Magnolia Grove website. http://www.magnoliagrove.co.nz/index.php/nz-raised-magnolia-collection. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

Peter Cave, New Zealand. Small, upright, slender habit. Flowers rose-purple.

‘Royal Robes’

Fine Gardening 167: 57, 2016

M. figo var. crassipes. Upright pyramidal. Flowers dark burgundy, to 2 cm. Profuse flowering.

‘Royal Splendor’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(‘Pink Royalty’ × ‘Daybreak’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers outside intense reddish pink, inside lighter pink. 9 tepals, pointed. Bloomed as a 2 m seedling; very floriferous, many lateral flower buds prolong bloom for as long as one month.

‘Royal Star’

Treseder, Magnolias, p. 116, 1974

M. stellata (Open-pollinated seedling of M. stellata ‘Waterlily’). Originated at John Vermuelen’s nursery on Long Island, NY, 1947. Introduced 1955. Flowers with 25-30 tepals, 7-10 days later than typical stellata.

‘Royal Tapestry’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Pink Surprise’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected and introduced by Roy G. Klehm, Barrington, IL. Upright, ca 5 m × 2 m in 10 years. Flowers reddish purple to greenish purple at base. 6 tepals. Flowering late-season, slightly fragrant.

‘Rubra’

Wada, Jap. Gard. Treas. p. 37, Hakoneya Nurseries, Numazu-Shi, Japan, circa 1925

M. stellata. Flowers deep rosy pink flowers, ultimately fading. Imported from Japan about 1925. There is another form by this name raised in Boskoop, Holland, by Messrs. Kluis before 1948. The latter was a chance seedling exhibiting tepals with a dark purple exterior (See Johnstone, 1955). Uncertain as to differences between the Japanese and Dutch forms. The latter was likely more frequently cultivated. = M. stellata ‘Halleana Rubra’; = M. stellata ‘Red Star’

‘Rubra’

Jour. Calif. Hort. Soc. 6: 239; 241, 1945

M. ×soulangeana. Red flowers, Grown by California Nursery Co. of Niles, CA in 1890. Predates ‘Rustica Rubra’, and not now identifiable.

‘Rubra’

M. ×veitchii See ‘Veitchii Rubra’.

‘Ruby’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 41: 61, 1988

M. ×soulangeana. Nomen nudum. See ‘Pickard’s Ruby’.

‘Ruby’

RareFind Nursery catalog, p. 51, 2003

Large, ruby-red flowers. Specifically noted as distinct from ‘Pickard’s Ruby’, but described as ‘Ruby’ derived from ‘Picture’, which is consistent with the parentage of ‘Pickard’s Ruby’. Potentially two selections were sold under this name. These probably = ‘Pickard’s Ruby’ or ‘Rustica Rubra’. See ‘Pickard’s Ruby’.

‘Ruby Star’

(‘Vulcan’ × M. liliiflora). Mark Jury, New Zealand, 2004. Flowers wine-red, tepals strap shaped. (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2015). Uncertain as to extent of distribution.

‘Ruby Rose’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 19, 1984

M. dawsoniana. Seedling originating in California. Flowers darker and larger than type, to 28 cm diameter.

‘Rud’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

([M. acuminata × M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’] × [M. acuminata × M. sargentiana]). Anders Blomqvist, from open pollinated seed provided by Dennis Ledvina. Flowers purple and white.

‘Rudolph’

M. stellata. Ethan Guthrie, Gainesville, GA. Representing propagules from a locally known Magnolia stellata growing on Historic Green St, Gainesville, GA in front of the restaurant “Rudolph’s”. Original tree has died, but selection occasionally distributed locally. Unpublished name. Characteristics differing from type or common M. stellata cultivars uncertain.

‘Ruff’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 149, 2000

M. grandiflora. Leaves colored much like ‘Satin Leaf’. Propagated in Oregon and Washington.

‘Rugosa’

Bosse, Vollst. Handb. Blumeng., Ed, 2, 2: 465. 1841

M. grandiflora. Leaves rugose, (wrinkled).

‘Rujuan’

Magnolia 53:2 [Issue 104]: 11, 2018

M. ×brooklynensis (M. ×brooklynensis ‘Yellow Bird’ × M. liliiflora ‘Hongyuanbao’). Selected by Jing Wang, China, 2014. Flowers 9-tepaled, outer surface orange to red, grading to yellow-red or yellow-green at base. Inner surface light red. Flowering late March to April (Xi’an, China).

‘Russet’

Jour. Calif. Hort. Soc. 27: 95-97, 1966

M. grandiflora. Introduced 1966. Leaves orange-brown tomentose underneath.

‘Rustica Flore Rubro’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 65: 71, 1940

M. ×soulangeana. Nomen nudum. As M. rustica ‘Flore Rubro’ in D. W. in Gardening Illustrated 33: 449. 1911? . See M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’.

‘Rustica Rosea’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 7 (1): 4, 1970

M. ×soulangeana. Very comparable to and likely synonymous with ‘Rustica Rubra’. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’.

‘Rustica’

de Candolle, Reg. Veg. Syst. 1: 4530, 1817

M. acuminata. Leaves narrower, less developed than typical of species. Sent to Lyon from Paris in 1777.

‘Rustica’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 201. 1915

M. denudata. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’.

‘Rustica’

Wister, Swarthmore Plant Notes, Ed. 3, 1 (1): 87, 1955-56

M. ×soulangeana. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’.

‘Rustica Rubra’

Boskoop ex Nicholson, Flora & Sylva 1: 17, T. facing p. 16. 1903

M. ×soulangeana (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’). Flowers large, bell-shaped. All tepals flushed deep rose. Flowering earlier than ‘Lennei’. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Purple Saucer’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Purple’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Red’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Flore Rubro’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rosea’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica’; = M. denudata ‘Rustica’

‘Ruth’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56: 20, 2005

(M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’ × M. liliiflora). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers large, purple, cup shaped.

‘Ruth’

The Tree Book, p. 286, 2019

M. ×loebneri. North Dakota State University. Dense tree to 5 × 3m. Flowers white, ca 11 cm diameter. 11-13 tepals. Very hardy, to USDA Zone 3b. Marketed as SPRING WELCOME® (USPTO Serial Number 77565803, Registration Number 3605866, registered April 14, 2009 and renewed in 2019.) The USPTO is a statutory registration authority, and the application for SPRING WELCOME® lists that it applies to “Live plants, namely, magnolia, specifically Magnolia x loebneri ‘Ruth’.” However, the USPTO is establishing SPRING WELCOME® as a name in reference to this cultivar, not “Ruth”, so this may not meet the criteria for registration by a statutory registration authority. As of current, it is tentatively considered an adopted name.

‘Saint George’

Pickard, Magnolia Gardens, 1967, Canterbury, Kent, England

M. grandiflora. Amos Pickard, England. Similar to ‘Lanceolata’, but more vigorous. Leaves broader, more russet beneath. Flowers creamy-white. Tepals 22-25. Fragrant.

‘Saint Mary’

W. B. Clarke & Co., catalog 1940-41, San Jose, California

M. grandiflora. Glen St. Mary Nursery, Glen St. Mary, FL, before 1930 from a seedling provided by Joseph Vestal & Son, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA. Leaves with conspicuously deep brown lower surface. = M. grandiflora ‘Glen Saint Mary’.

‘Salicifolia’

Page’s Prodromus, p. 37, 1817, Southampton, England

M. grandiflora. See M. grandiflora ‘Angustifolia’.= M. grandiflora ‘Hartwegus’; = M. grandiflora ‘Salicifolia Hartwegii’.

‘Salicifolia’

Bosse, Vollst. Handb. Blumeng., Ed. 2, 2: 464. 1841

M. virginiana var. australis. See M. virginiana var. australis ‘Angustifolia’.

‘Salicifolia Hartwegii’

Leroy, Cat. p. 65. 1856, Angers, France

M. grandiflora. = M. grandiflora ‘Hartwegus’, which = M. grandiflora ‘Angustifolia’. See M. grandiflora ‘Angustifolia’.

‘Samson et Delilah’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 142, 1994

M. campbellii. Flowers pink. Possibly of French origin. Cultivated at Strybing Arboretum, CA.

‘Samuel Sommer’

American Nurseryman, p. 97, May 15, 1961

M. grandiflora. Growth erect, sturdy. Leaves large, very glossy and prominently veined above, rusty-brown hairy beneath. Flowers to 36 cm diameter, tepals 12, in 3 whorls of 4.

‘San Jose’

Pickard, Magnolia Gardens List, p. 6, 1970, Canterbury, Kent, England

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. No description and epithet already in use for a M. ×soulangeana selection. Not established.

‘San Jose’

W. B. Clarke & Co., catalog 1940, San Jose, CA

M. ×soulangeana. Originated ca 1938. Vigorous. Flowers rosy-purple, larger than typical, and nearly as deeply colored as ‘Lennei’. Per Callaway (1994), there was also another form of unknown origin cultivated under this name, apparently with white flowers colored dark pink towards the tepal base.

‘San Marino’

Gossler Farms Nursery Plant List, 1971

M. grandiflora. Introduced 1970. Low habit. Leaves ruffled with light tomentum.

‘Sandling Park’

Rhod., Cam., & Mag Bulletin 113, p. 5, November 2013

M. wilsonii. From Sandling Park near Folkstone, Kent, England. Flowers larger than type with extra tepals, lightly stained pink. To 6m.

‘Sandy’

(M. salicifolia ‘Jermyns’ × ‘Caerhay’s Surprise’). John Carlson, Gwent, Wales. Dwarf. Flowers with 5-13 tepals. Scent similar to M. salicifolia (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2015). Possibly intended as ‘Sandy Carlson’.

‘Sangreal’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 225, 1994

(M. ×soulangeana × M. ×veitchii). Gresham hybrid (JG#10, LA#88) selected by John Allen Smith, Chunchula, AL. Vigorous, floriferous. Flowers large, red-purple. 9 tepals, 9-10 cm long.

‘Santa Cruz’

M. grandiflora. Leaves abundant, dark green, leaves 18 × 8 cm, elliptic-acute. Flowers white, to 23 cm diameter, 22 tepals. Unregistered, unpublished. Probably= ‘Exmouth’.

‘Santa Rosa’

Woodlanders, Inc., nursery catalog, p. 27, 1990-91, Aiken, South Carolina

M. virginiana var. australis. Bob McCartney, Woodlanders Inc., Aiken, SC. Very cold hardy. Holds foliage better than ‘Henry Hicks’ and similar cultivars though the winter.

‘Sara Gladney’

Magnolia 17(1) [Issue 31]: 15, 1981

M. macrophylla. Selection of the all-white flowered form native in Gloster Arboretum of the John James Audubon Foundation at Gloster, MS. Slightly earlier flowering.

‘Sara Koe’

Magnolia 50(1) [Issue 97]: 24-25, 2015

(‘Galaxy’ × M. campbellii). From hand pollinated seed by Mr. Magaki distributed through MSI Seed Counter (1991/9). Tree to ca 6 × 8 m. Large erect flowers deep pink to purple, overall similar to ‘Star Wars’ but starting darker and ending paler. Flowering mid-late April (Belgium). Named for Sara Koe, an English Magnolia lover who died in 1995 from progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP).

‘Sarah’s Favourite’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

Gresham hybrid (JG#2) introduced by John Allen Smith. Chunchula, AL. Flowers large, purple exterior white interior. Named for Sarah Gladney.

‘Sarasa’

Treseder, Magnolias, p. 164, 1974

See ‘Osaka’.

‘Sasquatch’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 686, 2009

M. grandiflora. Habit twice as a wide as tall.

‘Satellite’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 19, 1984

M. virginiana var. australis. U.S. National Arboretum introduction. Single stemmed tree with lateral branches arranged diffusely to eliminate the normal whorled appearance of the species. Selected from seedlot No. NA 31021 collected in 1968 in Tennessee.

‘Satin Beauty’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 686, 2009

M. grandiflora (‘Satin Leaf’ × ‘Empire State’). J. C. McDaniel. Leaves large and glossy.

‘Satin Leaf’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 326. 1996

M. grandiflora. Large, elliptic leaves with long petioles and impressed veins. Deep red-brown tomentum to leaf lower surface. Selected from a native tree in Tallahassee, FL. First propagated by Southern States Nursery Co., MacClenny, FL, before 1950; later by Jack O. Holmes Nurseries and others at Tampa, FL.

‘Satisfaction’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 53, 2011

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers large, red-pink outside, white inside. Fragrant.

‘Savage Splendor’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Dark Diva’). Phil Savage hybrid selected by Tim Savage and Dennis Ledvina. Flowers red, ca 5 in diameter. Late flowering, typically avoiding frosts.

‘Sawada’

Louisiana Nurseries catalog, p. 87, 1994-1996

M. denudata See ‘Sawada’s Cream’.

‘Sawada’s Cream’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 16, 1992

M. denudata. Tepals of the opening flower buds bright butter yellow. Fruits are profuse, bright crimson in color, with heavy seed set. Despite earlier publication of ‘Swada’ in reference to this epithet (Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 14, 1988-89, Springfield, Oregon, “creamy-yellow flowers”), this was almost certainly an error, with ‘Sawada’s Cream’ better reflective of existing usage.= M. denudata ‘Sawada’; = M. denudata ‘Swada’

‘Sawada’s Pink’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 139, 1994

M. denudata. Slight pink tinge to flowers. Obtained by Phil Savage from nurseryman K. Sawada of Mobile, AL.

‘Sayonara’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 89: Fig. 129 [photo called M. Sayonara], 1964

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). D. Todd Gresham. Arching habit. Flowers large, white, of good substance, base rose-pink, flowering late-season. Globular, not constricted at base. Description appears in Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc 12(2), 8, 1979.

‘Scarlet O’Hara’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

(‘Red Baron’ × ‘JURmag1’). Introduced by Erland Ejder and Swedish Magnolia Group from the K. E. Flinck Magnolia Forest, Alnarp, Sweden. Flowers reddish-pink, ca 9 tepals. Late and long flowering.

‘Scented Gem’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, accessed 26 Jan 2021

Selected by John Gallagher, Dorset, England from a mature plant growing near a temple in China. Raised at the Gorwell House Garden, Barnstaple, Devon, England. Very fragrant.

‘Scented Pearl’

Warners Nurseries website. http://warners.com.au/our-plants/plant/michelia-yunnanensis-scented-pearl. Accessed 13 Feb 2018

M. laevifolia. Evergreen, flowers white, slightly fragrant.

‘Scented Silver’

Magnolia 27(1) [Issue 51]: 26, 1991

M. stellata (Open-pollinated seedling of M. stellata ‘Green Star’). Selected in 1973. Flowers completely white without any tint of color.

‘Schlosspark Kronberg’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, accessed 10 Dec 2019

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Propagules from large specimen outside the rose garden of Schlosshotel Kronberg, Kronberg im Taunus, Hesse, Germany. Offered by lunaplant circa 2019.

‘Schluep Bhutan’

Magnolien und Tulpenbäume, p. 181, 2019

M. liliiflora. Seedling from Bhutan. Pale pink flowers.

‘Schwanensee’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

Gresham Hybrid (LA #121, JG#21). Flowers large, white.

‘Scituate’

Cistus Nursery mail order catalog, p. 90, Spring 2010

M. grandiflora. Narrow habit, smaller than type. Leaves with rusty pubescence to underside. Selected from a tree in Scituate, MA. Presumably a Harry Heineman selection based on origin, potentially = ‘Dioneses Bowl’. However the description for ‘Dioneses Bowl’ references only flower shape and the description for ‘Scituate’ references only habit and leaf morphology, so it is difficult to compare the two without examining material.

‘Seiju’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 109, 2000

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Nakamura selection. Flowers iridescent blue-green, opening to reveal bright yellow inner tepals.

‘Select No 3’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 686, 2009

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Select Trees, GA. Cold hardy. Vigorous. Per Article 21.19, this epithet could not be established due to use of #. Article 35.8 allows establishment if replaced with abbreviation “No”.

‘Select Pink’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. stellata. Nakamura. Flowers deep pink.

‘Selection’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. obovata. Gothenburg Botanical Garden, Sweden. Hardy form collected from Iwate Prefecture, N. Honshu, Japan. Not established. Per Article 21.17, use of “selection” prohibited in cultivar epithet after 1995. Does not appear to have been intended for cultivar status.

‘Semiplena’

Bosse, Vollst. Handb. Blumeng. 2: 465. 1841

M. grandiflora. Semi-double flowers.

‘Semiplena’

Aberconway, Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 65. 1940

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Nomen nudum. Kalleberg (1989) described a plant from Eisenhut under this name, which had ca 18 tepals, longer than type.

‘Semperflorens’

Dammann & Co., Prix-Courant No. 48, p. 28. 1890, Naples, Italy

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Semperflorens’

Bosse, Vollst. Handb. Blumeng., Ed. 2, 2: 464, 1841

M. virginiana. Everblooming. Cultivated in Liege, Belgium.

‘Sempervirens’

W. T. in Floricultural Cabinet 2: 140. 1834

M. virginiana. Sub-evergreen, presumably with good winter leaf retention.

‘Sentinel’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

Gresham hybrid. Flowers large, purple-red. Vigorous.

‘Serenade’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 18, 2000

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’ × ‘Jon Jon’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, 1996. Mid-sized tree to 3m in 10 years. Flowers white, to 20 cm diameter.

‘Serendipity’

(M. laevifolia × M. figo var. skinneriana). Bobby Green, Fairhope, AL. Cold-hardy hybrid. Uncertain as to specific characteristics. Some distribution under M05-004. Considering the extent to which M. figo var. skinneriana is confused or misidentified in US commerce, the pollen parent is likely instead M. figo var. figo.

‘Serene’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 5, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

(M. liliiflora × ‘Mark Jury’). Fastigiate habit. Flowers deep purple.

‘Setsuko’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(M. campbellii × M. ×soulangeana). Magaki, Japan. Flowers pink, 23 cm diameter, 12 tepals, opening flat.

‘Shady Grove No. 4’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 327, 1996

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Shady Grove Nursery, Orangeburg, SC. Habit broad, open, horizontal branching.

‘Shady Grove No. 6’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 327, 1996

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Shady Grove Nursery, Orangeburg, SC. Vigorous. Strong central leader.

‘Shag’

Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 9(2): 13. 1973

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Large tree on South Main Street, Princeton, IL ca 1973, with old outer bark referable to shagbark hickory.

‘Shi Banchi Rosea’

Junker’s Nursery website, http://www.junker.co.uk, Accessed 2019 Jan 10

M. stellata. Compare ‘Chrysanthemumiflora’, but flowers darker.

‘Shibamichi’

Bunting, Plant Lovers Guide to Magnolias, p. 91, 2016

M. foveolata. Akira Shibamichi, Shibamichi Nursery, Saitama, Japan. Flowers cream-yellow, red anthers. Flowering in mid-spring, sometimes as early as late winter.

‘Shipmast’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Helen Fogg’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Yellow flowers with light pink base. Fastigiate.

‘Shirazz’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 63: 20, 2010

Trade designation for the cultivar registered as ‘Vulden’. See ‘Vulden’.

‘Shirley Curry’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 225, 1994

(M. coco × M. grandiflora). S. Christopher Early, Atlanta, GA, 1985. Vigorous tree. Leaves intermediate in size, shiny on top, rufous on the lower surface. Flowers intermediate in size between the flowers of the parents. Seed coats are bright red and ornamental. This plant most closely resembles M. grandiflora in its general appearance.

‘Shirley’s Perfume’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ × M. cylindrica). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Spreading. Flowers pink. Fragrant. RareFind Nursery has listed one parent as ‘Pegasus’.

‘Showy’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, p. 377, 1942

M. ×soulangeana. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Spectabilis’.

‘Sidbury’

Hilliers Man. of Trees and Shrubs, Ed. 2. 1973

M. campbellii Raffillii Group. Sidbury Manor, Devon, before 1946. Medium to large-sized tree, vigorous. Flowers at a younger age than M. campbellii.

‘Siddharta’

lunaplant.de website. http://www.lunaplant.de/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(‘Paul Cook’ × ‘Eskimo’). Michael Gottschalk, Germany. Upright habit. Flowers white to pale pink (dark pink towards inner tepal base).

‘Silk Road’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 63: 21, 2012

M. ×pruhonica (M. tripetala × M. ×pruhonica). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers white, narrow tepals. Moderately fragrant.

‘Silver Cloud’

Hogan, Trees for All Seasons, p. 181, 2008

M. doltsopa. Duncan & Davies (New Zealand). Flowering at young age. Fragrant. See also RHS Rhododendrons, Camellias and Magnolias Vol 61. 2010.

‘Silver Parasol’

Arnoldia 41(2): 70-77, 1981

M. ×pruhonica. Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, MA. Leaves usually alternate, but those on older shoots crowded into false whorls. Outer 3 tepals reddish-green, the inner 6 (or 9) tepals creamy white. 8 to 10 inches across, tepals 9 (occasionally 12).

‘Silver Savage’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 686, 2009

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Head-Lee Nursery, Seneca, SC. Cold hardy.

‘Silver Tip’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 19, 1984

M. grandiflora. Tall, upright. Large, dark glossy green leaves with silver-grey undersides.

‘Simple Pleasures’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 63: 22-24, 2012

(M. liliiflora × M. kobus ‘Norman Gould’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers lavender-pink, cup-shaped. Mid-season. Slightly fragrant. Tetraploid.

‘Simpson’s Hardy’

Magnolia 46(2) [Issue 90]: 58-61, 2011

M. grandiflora. Flowers white. Hardy form surviving over 60 years at the Simpson Nursery Company, Vincennes, IN.

‘Sir Harold Hillier’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 53, 2011

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. campbellii). Hybrid with at least one parent the white-formed M. campbellii. Originated at Chyverton, Cornwall, England. This appears to be the same plant sometimes distributed as ‘Harold Hillier’ in New Zealand.

‘Skylands Best’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 19, 1984

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Richard Figlar, Pomona, NY. Leaves dark green, flowers yellow to 15 cm. Two crops: early spring and late summer. Originated at and named for Skylands Manor, New Jersey Botanical Garden.

‘Slankard’

Magnolia 31(2) [Issue 60]: 30, 1996

M. grandiflora. Joesph Hickman, Benton, IL, before 1996. Cold hardy selection likely named for George O. Slankard of Sesser, IL (1924-2020), a founding member of Magnolia Society International.

‘Slavin’s No 44’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. ×proctoriana. Flowers small, outstanding fragrance. Per Article 21.19, this epithet could not be established due to use of #. Article 35.8 allows establishment if replaced with abbreviation “No”. ‘Bernie Slavin #44’ per Luc De Jonge. John Weagle, has distributed this plant, but uncertain as to specific origin.

‘Slavin’s Snowy’

Morris Arb. Bull. 12: 19, 1961

M. ×proctoriana. Small, vigorous tree. Branchlets glabrous, green to purple. Buds densely white pubescent, flowers white flushed pink at the base. Tepals 6-9, obovate, 8-9 cm. Named for Bernard H. Slavin of the Rochester NY Parks Department. A selection of M. ×proctoriana per Gardiner (2002).

‘Sleeping Beauty’

Fairweather Gardens nursery catalog, p. 63, Fall 1999

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × ‘Sundance’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Flowers yellow. Remains fully dormant for 3–4 weeks after other Magnolias have flowered and leafed out. Some years in spring it appears dead because of its completely delayed growth.

‘Slim’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

Nomen nudum. Apparently, a synonym of ‘JURmag1’ (Luc De Jonge, pers. comm., 2020).

‘Small Flowered Soulangeana’

Swarthmore Plant Notes, Ed. 3, 1 (1): 86, 1955-56

M. ×soulangeana. See ‘Lilliputian’.

‘Smiling Face’

Rhod. with Cam. and Mag. 56: 22, 2005

M. figo. Referencing the clone typically grown in China. Characteristics uncertain.

‘Smith Fogle’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 686, 2009

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Brailsford. Leaves elongated and slightly twisted.

‘Smitty’

Magnolia 23(2) [Issue 44]: 4, 1988

M. grandiflora. Introduced by Shady Grove Nursery, Orangeburg, SC. Flowers 20-28 cm diameter.

‘Snow Angel’

Nurseries Caroliniana website, https://nurcar.com/, Accessed 10 Jan 2018

M. laevifolia. Introduced by Bobby Green, Fairhope, AL prior to 2013. Compact, about half the height of type. Fragrant. ‘Jenkins’ is a potential synonym. Per a conversation in 2019, it was unclear to Bobby Green as to whether ‘Jenkins’ or an unnamed seedling was sent to Nurseries Caroliniana.

‘Snow Bouquet’

Magnolia 51(1) [Issue 99]: 32, 2016

M. platypetala. Selected by Dick Figlar, Pickens, SC from a seedling received from Michael Dirr. Hardy form flowering profusely after low temperatures resulted in cold damage to all other M. maudiae types in Mr. Figlar’s collection. This cultivar was registered as a selection of M. platypetala, a taxon still under some debate as to placement. Other authors may prefer to consider as M. cavaleriei var. platypetala or M. maudiae var. platypetala.

‘Snow Dove’

Magnolia Grove website. http://www.magnoliagrove.co.nz/index.php/nz-raised-magnolia-collection. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

(M. maudiae × M. doltsopa). From rootstock seedling at Auckland Botanic Gardens, New Zealand. Rounded, white flowers. Sweet, spicy fragrance.

‘Snow Flurry’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook, p. 52, 2013

M. laevifolia. Callaghan and Png (2013) list as recent introduction in New Zealand but do not provide description. I believe this is a working name for a series of Mark Jury seedlings, eventually leading to Fairy Magnolia® White and does not refer to a specific selection.

‘Snow Goose’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 58: 19, 2007

(M. ×veitchii × M. ×soulangeana). Tim Thornton, England. Compare ‘Avocet’, but flowers purer white.

‘Snow White’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 5, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

(M. denudata × M. salicifolia). See ‘Wada’s Snow White’.

‘Snow White’

Magnolia 46(1) [Issue 89]: 27, 2011

M. laevifolia. Greenhills Propagation Nursery, Australia. Compact.

‘Snowbird’

Cistus Nursery catalog, p. 51, Fall 2012

M. laevifolia. Nevin Smith. Compact habit, abundant flowering. From seedlings collected in Kunming, China.

‘Snowdrift’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 19, 1984

M. ×loebneri. Flowers larger than M. stellata, 12 tepals per flower.

‘Soft Spring Cheers’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website, http://www.songsparrow.com, Accessed 10 Jan 2019

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Pink Surprise’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected by Roy Klehm, Barrington, IL. To 4 × 2 m in 10 years. Flowers cream and green, deep purple at base. 6 tepals.

‘Solar Flair’

Fairweather Gardens nursery catalog, p. 63, Fall 1999

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Gold Star’). Flowers yellow. heavily textured. Blooms late enough that its flowers open in spite of repeated frosts and freezes.

‘Solitaire’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘North Gold’ × ‘Ingemar’). Introduced by Erland Ejder and the Swedish Magnolia Group from the K. E. Flinck Magnolia Forest, Alnarp, Sweden. Flowers small, yellow, six petaloid and three sepaloid tepals. Late spring, floriferous.

‘Sonja Dobner’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, accessed 26 Jan 2021

(‘Atlas’ × ‘Star Wars’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Photo on lunaplant.de website depicts a flower similar to ‘Atlas’, but with somewhat narrower and darker pink tepals.

‘Sonnenkind’

lunaplant.de website. http://www.lunaplant.de/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

See ‘Golden Gift’.

‘Sonnleiten’

Magnolia 36(2) [Issue 70]: 20, 2001

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’). Gunther Pardatscher. Single-stemmed tree to ca 3 × 2 m in 7 years. Leaves 22 × 12 cm. Flowers deep red with lighter interior. Compare ‘Nigra’, but flowers slightly larger and appearing a week earlier.

‘Soulcamp’

Plantentuin Esveld website (http://www.esveld.nl). Accessed 6 Apr 2018

Nomen nudum. Per McDaniel (1978), “the Soulcamp hybrids” is in reference to three progeny of a cross by Charles P. Raffill at Kew in 1943, likely M. campbellii × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’. ca 1978, a plant at Lanarth at Cornall was 15 ft in 25 years with a shrub-like habit. The plant sold by Esveld likely traces its origin to Raffill’s hybrids, though without a description this cannot be determined.

‘South Korea’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Upright habit, hardy, dark red stamens. Fragrant.

‘Southern Belle’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. sieboldii × M. ×pruhonica). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Multi-stemmed habit. Flowers white, red stamens, appearing with the leaves.

‘Southern Charm’

United States Patent # PP13049P2, 2001

M. grandiflora. Bob Head, Seneca, SC. Compact, upright habit. Dark green glossy leaves. Vigorous.

‘Southern Lights’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 686, 2009

M. grandiflora. Flowering May-June and sporadically through remainder of summer. Fragrant.

‘Southern Pride’

M. grandiflora. Dense habit, broad, undulate foliage, medium green, rusty tomentose on back sides on new leaves losing most of the hairs (80%) by the time they fully expand. Fairly typical flowers but not a heavy bloomer. JC Raulston acquired this at the 1995 Southern Plant Conference, though the specific origins are unknown. McCracken’s Nursery, Zebulon, NC was selling ca 2012.

‘Southern Red’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(‘Pegasus’ × ‘Vulcan’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand.

‘Speciosa’

van Geel, Sert. Bot., Cl. XIII, T. 1832

M. ×soulangeana. Upright. Flowers nearly white, somewhat purple; Flush of color somewhat streaked, extends higher on tepal, 10 × 5 cm. One of the latest flowering M. ×soulangeana. From Belgian and French nurserymen, about 1825-1830.= M. ×soulangeana ‘Late Soulangeana’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Striped Saucer’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Striped’

‘Speciosa Nova’

Baumann, Cat. p. 12. 1842, Bollwiller & Mulhouse, France

M. ×soulangeana. Cultivated by Van Der Vis & Co., Boskoop, Holland; nomen nudum. Uncertain as to difference from ‘Speciosa’.

‘Spectabilis’

Mouillefert, Traite 119, 1891

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers white, large, lasting until May. = M. ×soulangeana ‘Showy’

‘Spectrum’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 19, 1984

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). W. F. Kosar, U.S. National Arboretum, 1962. Upright, oval habit. Compare ‘Galaxy’ (sister seedling) but larger flowers.

‘Spiced Spumoni’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

Roy Klehm, Barrington, IL, apparently from material hybridized at Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Upright, ca 3 m in 10 years. Flowers green and ivory with pink streaks.

‘Spring Beauty’

Dendroflora. 8: 73, 1971

M. ×soulangeana (‘Lennei’ × ‘Lennei Alba’). Den Ouden, 1971. Large flowers, purple-pink exterior with white interior.

‘Spring Dawn’

RareFind Nursery catalog, p. 31, 2020

(M. stellata ‘Rosea’ × M. zenii). Randall Kobetich, Rehoboth Beach, DE. Flowers consistently with pink exterior, cream interior. Flowering as early as February in Delaware.

‘Spring Hill’

Magnolia 23(2) [Issue 44]: 4, 1988

M. grandiflora. John Allen Smith, Chunchula, AL. Exceptional foliage.

‘Spring Joy’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 15, 1988-89, Springfield, Oregon

(M. stellata ‘Royal Star’ × ‘Wada’s Memory). Flowers pure white, to 15 cm diameter.

‘Spring Peppermint’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

Dennis Ledvina hybrid introduced by Roy G. Klehm, Barrington, IL. To ca 3 m × 2 m in 10 years. Flowers pale pink with lavender-red stripes. Fragrant.

‘Spring Petticoats’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery catalog, p. 55, 2015

M. ×loebneri (‘Leonard Messel’ × ‘White Rose’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid introduced by Roy G. Klehm, Barrington, IL. To ca 5 × 3 m in 10 years. Flowers white and soft pink, 28 tepals.

‘Spring Rite’

Morris Arb. Bull. 13: 49, 1962

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii). Flowers generally white, with the faintest rose-pink base staining.

‘Spring Royalty’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. liliiflora ‘Holland Red’ × M. ×loebneri ‘White Rose’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid selected and introduced by Roy Klehm, Barrington, IL. To 5 × 3 m in 10 years. Flowers deep purple-red outside, ivory inside. 6 tepals. Strong fragrance.

‘Spring Snow’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 7 (1): 2, figs 1-2. 1970

M. ×loebneri. Flowers pure white, 15 tepals, each ca 8 × 4 cm. Fragrant. Was cultivated as ‘Illinois’ by several American institutions, likely a temporary name.

‘Spring Song’

Blue Skin Nurseries & Cafe website, http://www.blueskinnurseries.co.nz/, Accessed 10 Jan 2019

M. ×loebneri. Blueskin Nurseries. Flowers pure white or greenish, fragrant.

‘Springfield’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 686, 2009

M. grandiflora. Leaf margins fused. Origin uncertain. Suspect this probably = ‘Harwell’, which may have been raised at Gossler Farms Nursery, Springfield, OR, a specialty grower of Magnolias, before 2009. Of course, Springfield could refer to a vast number of place names in the United States.

‘Stalwart’

McClintock, Gard. Jour. 12: 22, 1962

M. grandiflora. Crown dense, pyramidal habit, twice as tall as wide. Flowers with attractive pink sheaths on the slender leaf-buds.

‘Star Bright’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 5, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. ×loebneri. Tom Dodd Nurseries, Semmes, AL. Vigorous. Flowers resemble M. stellata.

‘Star Wars’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 225, 1994

(M. campbellii × M. liliiflora). Oswald Blumhardt, New Zealand, 1970’s. Habit comparable to M. campbellii, with a strong central leader. Flowers bright pink, darker than ‘Early Rose’. Outer tepals rolled inward. Flowering for almost a month. Fertile.

‘Starbright’

Magnolia Grove website, http://magnoliagrove.nz, Accessed 28 March 2020

(M. doltsopa ‘Silver Cloud’ × M. laevifolia). Pyramidal habit, branches horizontal. Flowers white. Fragrant. Though unlikely to be confused with M. ×loebneri ‘Star Bright’, the epithet should be considered already in use and cannot be established for this selection.

‘Starburst’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, accessed 9 Dec 2019

(M. cylindrica × ‘Genie’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand, 2006. Flowers red-purple. Inner tepals recurved.

‘Stardust’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 54: 47, 2003

See ‘Pickard’s Stardust’.

‘Stark White’

McClintock, Jour. Calif. Hort. Soc. 23: 36, 1962

M. campbellii. Flowers white. Cultivated by Dr. John Stark of Oakland, California, USA. Original plant from W. B. Clarke & Co. of San Jose, California from seed of Ghose & Co., India. Callaway (1994) lists as ‘Stark’s White’.

‘Starlite’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. stellata. Pink in bud, opening to white. Uncertain as to distinctness from species. Maybe = ‘Star Bright’.

‘Stellar Acclaim’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 54: 47, 2003

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. acuminata). Spreading tree, ca 6 m height. Leaves dark green, to ca 20 × 13 cm. Flowers pale yellow with rose-flushed base, to 20 cm diameter. Some potential distribution as R15-23. Commercially available in 2000 through McCracken’s Nursery, Zebulon, NC.

‘Stellar Gem’

Carter, “Cherry, magnolia blooms announce spring” in New Zealand Herald, 16 Aug 2017. https://www.nzherald.co.nz/wanganui-chronicle

(‘Star Wars’ × ‘Genie’). Listed as synonym of ‘Yoda’ on Kiwiflora website in 2021. See ‘Yoda’.

‘Stellar Ruby’

US Patent # PP29778, 2018

M. figo (M. figo var. skinneriana × M. figo var. crassipes). Pat McCracken, Zebulon, NC, 2010. Dense narrow, pyramidal habit. Flowers deep purple, fragrant. Floriferous and flowering form a young age. Since material carrying the name M. figo var. skinneriana in US commerce is largely not true to name (generally instead a cold-hardy form of M. figo var. figo), the seed parent was likely var. figo as opposed to var. skinneriana.

‘Stephanie’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 25-26, 2005

M. grandiflora. Steven Alex Zalany, Sheffield Village, OH. Leaves with very light indumentum to lower surface ca 17 × 7 cm. Flowers typically to 18 cm diameter, 9 tepals. Fragrant.

‘Strawberries and Cream’

Magnolia 37(2) [Issue 72]: 5, 2002

(M. denudata × M. sprengeri var. sprengeri ‘Diva’). Carl Ferris Miller, Korea. Named 2001-2002. From seedling gifted by Karl Flinck. Uncertain as to exact characteristics or extent of distribution.

‘Strawberry Fields’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(‘Pegasus’ × ‘Vulcan’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Upright columnar, red flowers.

‘Strawberry Shake’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(‘Purple Globe’ × ‘Joe McDaniel’). Michael Gottschalk, Germany. Flowers pale purple-pink, cup-shaped, dense. Long flowering duration.

‘STRgra’

US Patent # PP13851, 2003

M. grandiflora. Hybridized by E. V. and P. A. Strauss in Uki, New South Wales, Australia. Dwarf, early flowering, flowering period 6 months. Lemony fragrance. Marketed as BABY GRAND®.

‘Striata’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 154, 1915

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Rose striations to tepals.

‘Striata’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 233, 1915

M. virginiana. Nomen nudum.

‘Striata’

Loddiges, catalogue, Ed. 13, p. 25, 1823

M. ×soulangeana. Leaves elongate, acute. Possibly =M. ×soulangeana ‘Speciosa’.

‘Stricta’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 40: 202, 1915

M. denudata. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Stricta’.

‘Stricta’

Le Bon Jardinier 1833: 734, 1833

M. grandiflora. Erect pyramidal habit with narrow leaves. See ‘Exmouth’.

‘Stricta’

Mouillefert, Traite 119, 1891

M. ×soulangeana. Pyramidal, narrower than the type. Erect branches. = M. denudata ‘Stricta’

‘String of Pearls’

Magnolia 38(1) [Issue 37]: 7, 2003

Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. To 2.5 × 1.5 m in 10 years. Flowers white, 9 tepals in 3 whorls. Outer three reduced and pure white, inner six large with light pink base. Flowers form along stems. Parentage uncertain. Dennis Ledvina provided M. denudata × M. cylindrica in a partial listing of Savage introductions (See Magnolia 38(1) [Issue 37]: 7, 2003). Jonsson (2008) instead lists the pollen parent as ‘Pegasus’. Bunting (2016) describes as “M. denudata ‘Wada’s Form’ × (M. cylindrica [Krossa form] × M. denudata)”. “Wada’s form” probably refers to either M. denudata ‘Wada’ or M. denudata ‘Wada’s Japanese Clone’. Regardless of the specific plants involved in the cross, it is consistently listed as a hybrid involving M. cylindrica and M. denudata.

‘Striped Saucer’

Arb. Bull. Univ. Wash. 10 (4): 14, 1947

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers white with purple shading (striping). See M. ×soulangeana ‘Speciosa’.

‘Striped’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, p. 377, 1942

M. ×soulangeana. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6) that allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Speciosa’.

‘Striped Spice’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 25, 1994

M. ×soulangeana (Open-pollinated seedling of M. liliiflora [probably by M.×soulangeana]). Dick Figlar, Pomona, NY. Overall resembling cultivars of M. ×soulangeana. Flowers as typical save for a distinct red-purple stripe along the length of the tepals. 9 tepals, ca 10 × 5 cm. Flowering a few days later than most M. ×soulangeana. Distinct spicy fragrance.

‘Strybing Clone’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. dawsoniana. Flowers pink, large, long tepals. Callaway (1994) also lists as clone. See ‘Strybing’.

‘Strybing Compact’

Magnolia 48(2) [Issue 94]: 39, 2013

M. laevifolia. Introduced by Strybing Arboretum. Compact, shrubby, to 1.5 × 1 m in 20 years. Flowers creamy white, tepals green streaked toward apex, to 8 cm. Late March to late April.

‘Strybing White’

Jour. Calif. Hort. Soc. 23: 31; photo 34, 1962

M. campbellii. Eric Walther, Strybing Arboretum, San Francisco, California, USA. Flowers white, to 30 cm diameter. Tepals erect, not reflexed. From seed imported from Ghose & Co. India in 1940.

‘Strybing’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. dawsoniana. Flowers with large, long, pink, tepals. = M. dawsoniana ‘Strybing Clone’

‘Stubbs Purple’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018.

M. figo var. crassipes. Compact, hardier than species. Flowers purple, fragrant.

‘Subrotunda’

L. H. Bailey, Hortus, p. 381, 1930

M. grandiflora = M. grandiflora ‘Subrotundifolia’.

‘Subrotundifolia’

Koch, Hort. Dendr. 5., 1853

M. grandiflora. Dwarf, dense growing. Leaves thick, large and obtuse; rounded, glossy, light green. Flowers large. = M. grandiflora ‘Subrotunda’

‘Suede’

Jacobson, North American Landscape Trees, p. 327, 1996

M. grandiflora. Origin unknown. Compare ‘Russet’, but leaves larger.

‘Suishoren’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56: 22, 2005

(M. denudata × M. stellata). Nakamura. Flowers white, upright. To 13 ft (4m). = M. ‘Nakamura 8 Suishoren’

‘Suishoreu’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 698, 2009

M. ×soulangeana. Nakamura. Pink-flowers. Would suspect as orthographic error for ‘Suishoren’, but that selection has white flowers and parentage of stellata × denudata, not ×soulangeana. Confusion also present in Eisenhut description and Heerdegen and Eisenhut (2019), where listed as “denudata × stellata?”.

‘Sulphur Cockatoo’

Morris Arb. Bull. 13: 49. 1962

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). D. Todd Gresham, Santa Cruz, CA, before 1962. Flowers pale yellowish to cream, especially at the base of the outermost tepals, 6 inner tepals stained blue-violet at the base. Tepals reflex horizontally at maturity.

‘Summer Lady’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 December 2019

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Ruby’ × ‘Apollo’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany. Small tree, flowers large, bright purple-pink. Some remontancy into summer.

‘Summer Rose’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(‘Summer Lady’ × ‘Genie’). Marc Günther, Offenburg, Germany. Broad, dark reddish-pink tepals.

‘Summer Snowflake’

Cistus Nursery catalog, p. 81, Fall 2011

M. laevifolia. Cistus Nursery, Portland, OR, before 2011. Compact habit. Flowers larger and more numerous than type.

‘Summer Solstice’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 47: 76, 1995

(M. globosa × M. obovata). Chance seedling selected by Maurice Foster, Kent, England, with pollen parent suspected as pink-flowered form of Magnolia obovata. Flowers globe shaped, 10 cm diameter, deep pink exterior, white interior. Fragrant.

‘Sun Ray’

Magnolia 31(1) [Issue 59]: 18, 1996

(induced polyploid of ‘Sundance’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, 1996. Colchicine-induced polyploid of ‘Sundance’, creating a decaploid (2n=10x). Compare ‘Sundance’, but larger leaves, thicker stems, and flowers slightly larger and deeper yellow. Offered by Fairweather Gardens ca 2008.

‘Sun Spire’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 18, 2000

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman × ‘Elizabeth’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Fastigiate habit. Flowers deep yellow, late-season. Sibling of ‘Sun Sprite’.

‘Sun Sprite’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 69, 2009

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman × ‘Elizabeth’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Sister seedling to ‘Sun Spire’ Flowers dark yellow, purple base. An unofficial name per McCracken (Dirr 2009), though plant has been available for sale under this name by Reimer Nurseries and lunaplant ca 2019.

‘Sunburst’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 18, 2000

(‘Woodsman’ × ‘Gold Star’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC 1997. Somewhat upright tree. Flowers deep yellow.

‘Sundance’

Magnolia 21(2) [Issue 42]: 12, 1986-7.

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC, from J. C. McDaniel seed provided through the Magnolia Society International Seed Counter. Flowers “barium yellow”; tepals R.H.S. yellow 10B outside, yellow 10C-D inside. 20 cm diameter. Propagates easily from cuttings.

‘Sunrise’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 54, 2011

Flowers white with red at tepal base, extending in a line to apex. Not established. This name was against the wishes of the introducer. See ‘Lv Xing’.

‘Sunrise’

Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website, http://www.songsparrow.com, Accessed 20 Jan 2020

(M. acuminata × M. ×loebneri ‘White Rose’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI, before 2006. Hardy, compact. Description on Song Sparrow website references “goblet-shaped white blooms with distinctive red flares”, but accompanying photo shows pale yellow flower with ca 15 tepals. The photo appears to be in error and is probably depicting ‘Canary Charm’. A tree labeled ‘Sunrise’ at Green Bay Botanical Garden, received from Dennis Ledvina, has pale-yellow flowers measuring ca 12-16 cm diameter consisting of 9-15 tepals. It is overall comparable to ‘Canary Charm’, but with darker flowers, notably greenish-yellow when emerging from bud.

‘Sunsation’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 68]: 18, 2000

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Elizabeth’). August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Selected 1997, introduced 2000. Upright, narrow habit, to ca 3 × 2 m. Flowers deep yellow, to 17 cm, appearing late season but before leaf out. Sister seedling to ‘Sun Spire’, but faster growing. = M. ‘18-60’

‘Sunset’

H. H. Hume, Morris Arb. Bull. 12: 16. 1961

M. grandiflora. Leaves elliptic, upper surfaces variegated, splashed with light yellow, lower surfaces tomentose, yellowish green. A wild seedling from Glen Saint Mary, FL.

‘Sunset Swirl’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

(‘Pink Royalty’ × ‘Daybreak’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Flowers pink, colors similar to M. ‘Daybreak’ but with excellent form that matures to a flat pinwheel, no floppiness.

‘Sunshine’

(‘Serenade’ × ‘Golden Endeavor’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand, 2010. Flowers bright yellow. (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2015). Unpublished name. Uncertain as to extent of distribution.

‘Suntown’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(M. acuminata × [M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’]). Selected and raised by Anders Blomqvist from seed received from Dennis Ledvina. Flowers intense yellow.

‘Super Star’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 162, 1994

M. ×loebneri. Ray Bracken, Piedmont, SC. Fast growing tree (1-2 m) per year, producing a rounded canopy. Flowers white, to 15 cm diameter with 11-16 narrow tepals. Compare ‘Merrill’, but faster growth rate.

‘Super Sweet’

M. virginiana var. australis. Kevin Parris, Spartanburg, SC. Unpublished name referencing a fine M. virginiana var. australis (Texas/Louisiana form) growing on the campus of Spartanburg Community College, South Carolina, USA. Some use as a breeding parent, but not propagated or distributed to any great extent.

‘Superba’

Robert Buist, Descr. Cat. Hardy Trees p. 22. 1854, Philadelphia

M. ×soulangeana From J. Cels, Montrouge, France per Mouillefert, Traite 119 (1891), who considers this the same as ‘Alexandrina’ and ‘Norbertii’. This seems unlikely as ‘Norbertii’ is a distinct dwarf selection. Potentially synonymous with a selection carrying the name ‘Alexandrina’, though further research into that complex would be necessary to clarify.

‘Superba’

Ellwanger & Barry. Descr. catalogue 2: 4. 1855

M. virginiana. Nomen nudum.

Superba Rosea

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 698, 2009

M. ×soulangeana. Introduced by Tom Dodd Nurseries, Semmes, AL, before 1964. Flowers bright pink, late-season. Not established due to use of Latin cultivar epithet after 1958 (Art 21.11). Probably = ‘Pink Alba Superba’.

‘Susan’

Dudley & Kosar, Morris Arb. Bull 19: 26. 1968

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. stellata ‘Rosea’). U.S. National Arboretum introduction. Flowers red-purple, from erect buds. Six weakly clawed tepals, flowering mid-season. A sterile triploid. U.S. Natl. Arb. #28350. Named for Susan Skinner (daughter of then-U.S. National Arboretum director Henry T. Skinner).

‘Susanna Van Veen’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 6, 1989

(M. sargentiana × M. sprengeri). Flowers large, brilliant rose-red, without purple shading. Buds furry and decorative. Early season.

‘Suzette’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 103, 1994

M. grandiflora. See ‘Opal Haws’.

‘Swada’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 14, 1988-89, Springfield, Oregon

M. denudata See ‘Sawada’s Cream’.

‘Swansong’

Pan Global Plants website (http://www.panglobalplants.com). Accessed 3 Apr 2018

M. ×loebneri. Maurice Foster, Kent, England. Late Flowering.

‘Swarthmore Sentinel’

Magnolia 44(1) [Issue 85]: 18-20, 2009

M. denudata. Originated from seed at Beijing Botanical Garden donated to the JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh, NC with a resulting plant gifted to the Scott Arboretum of Swarthmore College, Pennsylvania, USA in 1987. Narrow, upright habit.

‘Swede Made’

Magnolia 52(2) [Issue 101]: 20, 2017

M. ×wieseneri. Stefan Mattson, Vasteras, Sweden. Flowers spoon-shaped, 15-20 cm diameter. Vigorous, hardy, prolonged flowering. Very fragrant.

‘Sweet Love’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 63: 24, 2012

(M. sieboldii × ‘Oriental Charm’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Fastigiate. Flowers large, white, up to 12 large tepals. Roots easily from softwood cuttings.

‘Sweet Merlot’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 54, 2011

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Sweet Simplicity’ × ‘JURmag1’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Flowers deep pinkish-red outside, pale pink inside. Globe shaped, to ca 6 × 4 m. Second sister seedling of ‘Cameo’. = M. ‘Early Red’

‘Sweet Rose’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Sweet Simplicity’ × ‘JURmag1’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Photos on Eisenhut website depict flowers with 10 wide dark purple-pink tepals.

‘Sweet Simplicity’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. ×soulangeana. Small flowered dwarf form. Tepals slightly pointed, white interior. Fragrant.

‘Sweet Sixteen’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 19-20, 1984

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid (JG#16, LA#57). Large oval-shaped tree. 13 cm long flower buds are produced in quantity; flowers open to wide cups.

‘Sweet Summer’

Magnolia 27(1) [Issue 51]: 26, 1991

M. grandiflora. Frank Galyon, Knoxville, TN. Flowers large; 9 to 12 tepals. Initially suspected as hybrid with M. virginiana (M. virginiana var. australis × M. grandiflora ‘Samuel Sommer’), though flow cytometery by Parris (2011) revealed the plant as a hexaploid, and likely just pure M. grandiflora.

‘Sweet Valentine’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag 61: 16, 2010

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Sweet Simplicity’ × ‘JURmag1’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Flowers rose-purple, tulip-shaped. Sister seedling to ‘Cleopatra’ and ‘Sweet Merlot’.

‘Sweetheart’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 264, 2000

(Open-pollinated seedling of ‘Caerhays Belle’). Small to medium-sized tree, more upright than ‘Caerhays Belle’. 12 broad tepals, deep rich pink outside, pale pink inside.

‘Sybille’

Magnolia 53(2) [Issue 104]: 9, 2018

(M. ×soulangeana ‘White Giant’ × ‘Leda’). Hybridized by Philippe de Spoelberch, Belgium in 2000 and introduced ca 2010. Flowers white, measuring 30 cm diameter when open. 9 wide tepals.

‘Symmes Select’

Magnolia 23(2) [Issue 44]: 3, 1988

M. grandiflora. John Symmes, Cedar Lane Farm, Madison, GA, 1966. From a seedling in Westview Cemetery, Atlanta, GA. Compact. Leaves dark green with slightly undulating margins and heavy brown indumentum.

‘Syracuse’

Magnolia 29(2) [Issue 56]: 26, 1994

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Selected by Richard B. Figlar, Pomona, NY. Flowers smaller than typical. Selected primarily to provide genuinely hardy genetic material for magnolia breeders. Form is typical M. acuminata except that the leaf margins have virtually no undulations.

‘Tardiflora’

Le Bon Jardinier 1833: 734, 1833

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Tensaw’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 704, 2009

M. virginiana var. australis. Introduced by Tom Dodd III, Semmes, AL. Upright habit. Leaves tiny, <5 cm in length. Twigs pubescent. One of five small leaved selections by Tom Dodd III (See also: ‘Apalachee’, ‘Cahaba’, ‘Coosa’, and ‘Perdido’). Uncertain as to distinctions between selections. Of the five, ‘Tensaw’ was apparently the most amenable to vegetative propagation and therefore, likely the most dominant clone in cultivation.

‘Tetraploid Nr. 1’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. stellata. Nomen nudum. Not established. Probably a temporary name for a tetraploid seedling of unknown origin.

‘Texas Strain’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 693, 2009

M. fraseri var. pyramidata. Flowers white, fragrant. From western limits of distribution (East Texas). Most likely in reference to seedlings from the Newton and Jasper County, TX populations of the species. Must reject as not established due to use of word “strain” (Art 21.17).

‘The Spira’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

Nomen nudum. Photos on Eisenhut website depict a M. kobus or M. salicifolia type with a pink midrib on the base of the outer tepal.

‘The Parson’s Choice’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. liliiflora ‘Holland Red’ × M. ×loebneri ‘White Rose’). Dennis Ledvina hybrid introduced by Roy G. Klehm, Barrington, IL. To 2.5 m in 10 years. Flowers purple-red outside, ivory inside. 6 tepals. Fragrant.

‘Theodora’

Burncoose Nurseries website. http://www.burncoose.co.uk. Accessed 8 Mar 2018.

(‘Dark Shadow’ × M. campbellii). Maurice Foster, England. Flowers goblet-shaped, purple.

‘Thomas Messel’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. sprengeri. Flowers white, though listed as a ‘Diva’ selection.

‘Thompsoniana’

Nederlandsche Flora & Pomona, p. 132 (+ pl. 43), 1879

M. ×thompsoniana. For the original clone first referenced as M. virginiana var. major circa 1808, later deemed a hybrid and named for the introducer, Archibald Thompson. Per Gardiner (2000) the plant is fragrant, but with an ungainly habit.

‘Thousand Butterflies’

Burncoose Nurseries catalog, p. 54, 2011

M. ×veitchii (M. ×veitchii × M. denudata). Os Blumhardt, New Zealand. Upright, flowers pink.

‘Tiantian’

Magnolia 53(2) [Issue 104]: 12, 2018

(M. balansae × M. figo). Ya-ling Wang, Xi’an Botanical Garden, 2001. 4-5m. Flowers with six tepals, 2 whorls of 3. Tepals creamy-white or pale yellow with pale-green outer base. Flowering between January-May (Shenzhen, China), with highest concentration in first two months.

‘Tickled Pink’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

M. ×loebneri. Tom Krenitsky, Chapel Hill, NC. Later flowering, 12-14 soft pink petaloid tepals and three small sepaloids.

‘Tiffany’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

(M. ×soulangeana × M. ×veitchii). Gresham hybrid. Tepals white with pink flush at base.

‘Tikitere’

Magnolia Grove website. http://www.magnoliagrove.co.nz/index.php/nz-raised-magnolia-collection. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(‘Apollo’ × ‘Vulcan’). Vigorous, rounded habit. Flowers pink, abundant, wind hardy.

‘Tina Durio’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 20, 1984

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei Alba’ × M. ×veitchii ‘Peter Veitch’). Gresham hybrid introduced by Ken Durio, Louisiana Nurseries, USA (LA#75). Flowers pure white, to 30 cm diameter, resembling M. campbellii. 9-12 broad tepals, with a small amount of pink at the base.

‘Tinkerbelle’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. ×soulangeana (‘Sweet Simplicity’ × ‘Cameo’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Compact, columnar. Flowers dark reddish-purple. Registered as ‘Tinkerbelle’ with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (PP#31317).

‘Titan’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. ×brooklynensis. Flowers large, yellow-green exterior, pink-yellow interior.

‘TMGH’

United States Patent # PP11612, 2000

M. grandiflora (Open-pollinated seedling of M. grandiflora ‘Hasse’). Selected by Thomas Strickland in 1993 from a chance seedling in Bulloch County, GA. Strongly upright habit, lustrous dark green leaves with medium brown indumentum. Marketed as ALTA®.

‘Todd Gresham’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 20, 1984

(M. ×veitchii × M. ×soulangeana ‘Rustica Rubra’). Gresham hybrid introduced by Ken Durio, Louisiana Nurseries, USA (JG#1, LA#78, G66#1). Fast growing. Flowers reddish-lavender. 9 broad tepals with white inner surface and faint pink highlights, to 25 cm diameter.

‘Todd’s Forty-Niner’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 225, 1994

(‘Rouged Alabaster’ × ‘Royal Crown’). Selected after Gresham’s death from hybrids he sent to Tom Dodd Nurseries, Semmes, AL. Named by Bill Dodd in 1986. This was the forty-ninth cross made by Gresham in 1964. Flowers dark purple in bud, lighter in color when open. 12 tepals. Outer 4 tepals are reflexed at anthesis, red-purple outside and lighter toward the tips; inside of tepals translucent white; inner 8 tepals are held erect.

‘Toju’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 698, 2009

M. ×soulangeana. Selected by Nakamura Nurseries. Flowers clear pink.= M. ‘Nakamura 5 Toju’

‘Tom Dodd seedling #4’

Gardiner, Magnolias, pp. 40-41, 1989

M. ×soulangeana. See ‘Dodd No 4’.

‘Tomentosa’

Le Bon Jardinier 1833: 734. 1833

M. grandiflora. Leaves ovate-elongate, red-brown lanuginose-tomentose beneath.

‘Tommy’s Fragrant Heaven’

Magnolia 43(1) [Issue 83]: 20-27, 2008

(M. liliiflora ‘O’Neill’ × ‘Pegasus’). Hybridized by Dennis Ledvina, selected by Olav Kalleberg, Norway. Slow growing, dense. Flowers upright, white flushed with purple giving pink appearance.

‘Tonia’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 Apr 2018

(M. ×veitchii × M. liliiflora). Flowers with dark pink exterior, white interior. Compare ‘Royal Crown’. Potentially a name used for one of Gresham’s unregistered hybrids based on parentage.

‘Topaz’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 686, 2009

M. grandiflora. Pyramidal. No further information.

‘Tor’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. ×gotoburgensis. Hybridized by Tor G. Nitzelius, former dendrologist at Gothenburg Botanical Garden, Sweden. Previously known under the working name “Clone 2”.= M. gotoborgensis ‘Clone 2’

‘Toro’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website. http://www.songsparrow.com. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(M. acuminata × M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI, before 2002. Large flowers, light cream-pink with red streaking.

‘Touch of Class’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 20, 2005

(M. liliiflora ‘Nigra’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘San Jose’). Vance Hooper, Duncan & Davies Nurseries, New Plymouth, Taranaki, New Zealand. Estimated 6-8 m height at maturity. Upright and multi-branched. Flowers rich purple, blending into a light purple, with distinctive creamy-white tepal margins; inner tepal surfaces are creamy-white with wine-purple staining at base. Typically nine tepals forming a goblet shape; 12 × 7 cm. Light, fruity fragrance.

‘Touch of Pink’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. maudiae. Evergreen shrub, flowers tinged pink. Callaghan and Png (2013) refer to ‘Touch of Pink’ as a doltsopa × figo hybrid. Also listed in Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56: 22, 2005 as bushy evergreen shrub with flowers to 7 m. Uncertain if these represent different selections.

‘Trade Form’

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Unpublished name. Per conversation with Jim Gardiner in 2020, this was a name used by Phil Savage to indicate the commonly available form of M. acuminata var. subcordata used in his crosses (as opposed to ‘Fertile Myrtle’ or ‘Miss Honeybee’). It does not appear to have specific characteristics. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘Tranquility’

McCracken’s Nursery web catalog, 2000

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. acuminata). Mature height to 5 m. Rounded habit. Leaves wavy, cupped upward, maturing to 15 cm. Flowers pale golden yellow with slight rose blush at base, to 20 cm diameter. Some distribution possible as “R15-20”.

‘Transformation’

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexandrina’ × ‘Red Baron’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI per Tom Trzebiatowski Jr. Was offered by Klehm’s Song Sparrow Nursery, Avalon, WI in early 2019 and Brotzman’s Nursery, Madison, OH in 2021. Characteristics and specific parentage uncertain. Not published.

‘Trelissick’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

Seedling of M. campbellii in cultivation at Caerhays and perhaps elsewhere in Cornwall, England. Flowers not quite pure white. Also listed as ‘Trelissick Alba’.

‘Trengwainton Pale Form’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p, 1, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. campbellii. Flowers large, delicate shade of pink. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958. See ‘Handsome Gift’.

‘Treseder’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 120, 1994

M. delavayi. Offered by Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, Louisiana, USA in 1990 with “More tepals than typical.” Description is sufficiently vague to warrant confusion with M. delavayi ‘Multitepal’, also offered by Louisana Nursery that year. Presumably this was a plant received directly or indirectly from Treseder’s Nurseries, though the origin is unclear. Additionally, ‘Treseder’ is also applied by Callaway (1994) to a M. salicifolia selection. Not established. See below.

‘Treseder’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 164, 1994

M. salicifolia. Compact, conical habit. Originated at Treseder’s Nurseries, Cornwall, England. Callaway (1994) also lists an M. delavayi selection with the same epithet. Confusion between these two selections (a deciduous Yulania-type and a large-leaved evergreen) would be generally unimaginable. Neither appear to have been widely published or distributed and there is little evidence they remain in cultivation today. Priority is difficult to establish as both appear to have been published at the same time. My preference is to accept M. salicifolia ‘Treseder’ as the description is more precise, less easily confused with similar cultivars, and the cultivar epithet better represents this selection, having definitively originated at Treseder’s Nurseries.

‘Trewidden Belle’

(M. sargentiana × M. campbellii ‘Lanarth’). Flowers large, deep purple. (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2015). Uncertain as to introducer or degree of distribution.

‘Treve Holman’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 20, 1984

(M. campbellii × M. sargentiana). Fast growing tree. Flowers deep rose-pink with red-purple shading.

‘Trevei’

IDS Yearbook, p. 49, 1966

M. grandiflora. Floriferous and hardy form originating in Auvergne, France circa 1870-1880. Propagation difficult. This could be synonymous with the M. grandiflora ‘Biflora’ associated with Treve in the 1800s, but uncertain whether both selections exhibit the characteristic “twinned” flowers. = M. grandiflora ‘Francais Treques’; = M. grandiflora ‘Francois Treyves’

‘Trewithen’

Johnstone, Asiatic Magnol. Fig. 11. 1955

M. liliiflora. Flowers outside dark carmine, inside pale rose. Very large, to 12 cm. long.

‘Trewithen Dark Form’

Johnstone, Asiatic Magnol., T. Opp. p, 47, 1955

M. campbellii. Flowers very deep rose to rose-red outside, paler pink to rose-pink inside. Per article 21.16, “form” is acceptable in cultivar epithets published prior to 1958.

‘Trewithen Light Form’

Johnstone, Asiatic Magnol., Fig. 3 facing p. 50. 1955

M. campbellii. Flowers rose-pink outside, paler pink inside which deepens towards tepal margins. Flowers open nearly flat. Per article 21.16, “form” is acceptable in cultivar epithets published prior to 1958.

‘Triumphans’

Bosse, Vollst. Handb. Blumeng., Ed. 2, 2: 467, 1841

M. ×soulangeana. Flowers with tepals red on exterior at base and along midribs. Compare ‘Rustica Rubra’.

‘Tropicana’

Magnolia 52(1) [Issue 100]: 23, 2017

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Spreading habit, height ca 4 m in 13 years. Flowers yellow, mixing with pink towards the base. Flowers mid-late April with some flowers still appearing until mid-May (St Austell, England). Winner of Best in Show Magnolia Cup at 2014 RHS Rhododendron, Camellia, and Magnolia show at Rosemoor.

‘Tulsa’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 20, 1989

M. grandiflora. L. C. Case, Winchester, MA. Flowers to 20 cm diameter. Raised from a batch of seeds collected at the Tulsa Rose Garden in Tulsa, OK in 1974; First flowers were produced in 1988.= M. grandiflora ‘Winchester’

‘Twiggy’

Magnolia 49(1) [Issue 95]: 41, 2014

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. elegantifolia [probably by M. figo]). Richard Figlar, Pickens, SC. Pyramidal, densely branched, ca 4 m × 3 m in 13 years. Flowers nearly white with slight pink/purple picotee. Mild fragrance similar to “tart banana”. Very slender twigs. Sparse flower production.

‘Twinflower’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, accessed 10 Dec 2019

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Twin-flowered form sold by lunaplant.de circa 2019. Source tree in Unterpremstätten, Styria, Austria. Uncertain if distinct from Lavelle’s ‘Biflora’ of the late 19th century.

‘Twinkle Twinkle’

M. laevifolia (Open-pollinated seedling of M. laevifolia ‘Jenkins’). Kevin Parris, Spartanburg, SC. Compact form (ca. 1 × 2 m in 10 years). Uncertain as to degree of distribution.

‘Two Stones’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 160, 1994

M. stellata. August Kehr, Hendersonville, NC. Flowers larger and with thicker tepals than typical. Generally listed as a colchicine induced tetraploid, however flow cytometry data by Parris et al (2010) suggests ‘Two Stones’ is instead a diploid. Furthermore, the species assignment of this cultivar has been inconsistent. It is M. stellata for Callaway (1994) and Robinson (2003), but M. kobus for Gardiner (2002). Photos of a young, now dead plant at Bartlett Tree Research Laboratories and Arboretum (Charlotte, NC) depict flowers with ca 25 tepals, closer to expectations for M. stellata, but arborescent habit may indicate affinities with M. ×loebneri.

‘Tyler James’

New Zealand Garden Journal 16(1): 28, 2013

(‘First Flush’ × ‘Caerhays Belle’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers large, creamy, with slight pink tinge.

‘U.S.L. Variegated’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 686, 2009

M. grandiflora. Leaves yellow-gold variegated.

‘Ula’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 61: 14-15, 2010

(‘Caerhays Belle’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba’). Ian Baldick, New Zealand. Flowers bright pink, late-season.

‘Ultimate Yellow’

Magnolia 31(1) [Issue 59]: 18, 1996

M. ×brooklynensis (M. ×brooklynensis × M. acuminata). J. C. McDaniel hybrid selected by Harry Heineman, Scituate, MA, 1991. Flowers yellow with slight green, open-cupped form to 15 cm diameter. 6 tepals. Flowering before the leaves are half-expanded. Strict interpretation of the code could prevent establishment of this epithet as use of the word “ultimate” suggests that no superior yellow magnolia will be named or introduced, potentially exaggerating its merits (Art 21.24). However, the selection is already registered and use of the current name would preserve existing usage.

‘Umberto I’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort.7: 318, 1882

M. grandiflora. Reflorescent, flowering without interruption.

‘Undulata’

Buist. catalogue 8: 48. 1844, Philadelphia, Penn., USA

M. grandiflora. Leaves with undulated margins. Flowers typical. Probably imported from Leroy of Angers, France. Millias (1927) listed as broad leaved form with wavy margins.= M. grandiflora ‘Longifolia Undulata’.

‘Unicolor’

Lavallee, Arbe Segrez. 8. 1877

M. kobus. Nomen nudum.

‘Upright Silversmith’

Magnolia 51 [Issue 98]: 41-42, 2015

M. virginiana var. australis. Bill Smith, Richmond, VA. Multi-trunked, somewhat upright.

‘Urbana’

Langford, Check List of the Cultivated Magnolias, p. 83-84, 1994

M. ×thompsoniana. J. C. McDaniel, Urbana, IL, 1960. Multi-stemmed, arching shrub. Leaves and flowers comparable to M. tripetala. Compare ‘Thompsoniana’, but hardier. Sterile. Type tree in Urbana, IL, USA. See also data in Illinois Research, p. 8-9, Fall 1966. Listed on Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (magnoliastore.com) ca 2018.

‘Ursula Grau’

Magnolia 29(1) [Issue 55]: 27, 1994

M. sieboldii subsp. sinensis. Flowers with 17 tepals, resembling a semi-double camellia. Flowering 3 weeks ahead of M. sinensis; repeats in August. Fragrant.

‘Vairano’

Magnolia Grove website. http://www.magnoliagrove.co.nz/index.php/nz-raised-magnolia-collection. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

Hybridized by Os Blumhardt, New Zealand, named in Switzerland at Eisenhut Nurseries. Mid-sized, rounded. Slight fragrance.

‘Valentine’s Torch’

M. campbellii. Michael White, 2016. Flowers cream-colored with pink flush to inner tepal. Cultivated at Mount Congreve, Ireland ca 2020 (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020). Unpublished name. Uncertain as to degree of distribution.

‘Valerius Red’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, accessed 2021 January 26

M. insignis. Dr. Valerius, Geissen, Germany. Selected from a group of seedlings ca 2000. Somewhat hardier and more upright than typical. Pink-red flowers. Distributed 2018 by Botanic-Treasures, Antwerpen, Belgium and in 2021 by Lunaplant.de.

‘Valley Splendour’

Gardiner, Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 134, 2000.

M. dawsoniana. Flowers deep pink, in masses. second half of march (Southern England).

‘Van Houttei’

Millais, Magnolias, p. 242, 1927

M. ×soulangeana. Pampanini (1916) listed in synonymy with M. liliiflora ‘Reflorescens’, though this is questionable as at least one of the selections moved into synonymy was a ‘Lennei’ seedling, which likely would have been considered M. ×soulangeana, not M. liliiflora.

‘Van Veen’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 5, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland.

M. salicifolia. Leaves bamboo-like. Flowers white, fragrant.

‘Van-Houttei’

Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 41: 106, 1916

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum

‘Vance Hooper’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018.

Flowers burgundy red, cream inside.

‘Vanilla Milkshake’

M. ×pruhonica. Dennis Ledvina. Fragrant. (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020). Unpublished name. Uncertain as to physical characteristics or degree of distribution.

‘Variegata’

Ellwanger & Barry, Descr. catalogue, p. 4. 1855

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Seedling with silvery-blotched foliage. = M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Foliis Variegatis’

‘Variegata’

Bean, Trees & Shrubs 2: 67, 1914

M. acuminata var. acuminata. Leaves handsomely blotched with golden yellow. Probably = the ‘Aurea’ of Nicholson, 1683. See M. acuminata ‘Aurea’.

‘Variegata’

W. D. in The Garden 73: 432, 1909

M. grandiflora. Compare M. grandiflora ‘Foliis Variegatis’, but leaves with yellow as opposed to white variegation.

‘Variegata’

M. obovata. Appears on a Shibamichi Magnolia list dated 11/2005, but without description does not meet criteria for establishment. Not established. Additionally, cultivar epithets cannot be comprised entirely of Latin after 1958.

‘Variegata’

Nakai, Fl. Sylv. Kor. 20: 120, 1933 [as M. parviflora f. variegata]

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Leaves variegated white. Mt. Chiisan, Korea.

‘Variegata’

Walraad ex Schelle in Beissner et al., Handb. Laubholz-Benennung 99. 1903

M. ×soulangeana. Nomen nudum.

‘Variegata’

Meehan’s Monthly 6: 173, 1896

M. tripetala. Leaves golden. From the grounds of Senator J. Donald Cameron, Harrisburg, PA.

‘Variegata’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 704, 2009

M. virginiana var. australis. Leaves with cream to yellow mottled variegation. Not established due to use of Latin epithet after 1958 (Art 21.11).

‘Veerle’

Magnolia 44(1) [Issue 85]: 18-20, 2009

M. campbellii. Selected by Theo Kuijpers, Heythuysen, the Netherlands. Spontaneous seedling, exceptionally hardy surviving temperatures of -4 F (-20 C). Listed as ‘Verle’, incorrectly.

‘Vegetable Garden’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 690, 2009

M. ×loebneri. Introduced by Camellia Forest Nursery, Chapel Hill, NC. Compact, floriferous. Flowers comparable to M. stellata.

‘Veitch Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, circa 1973, P. 3, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. campbellii. Nomen nudum. Must reject as not published due to lack of description (Art. 27.1). Perhaps this was the clone distributed by Peter Veitch during the early 1900’s, discussed by Treseder (1978) and conjectured to be the most common form in English gardens ca 1970’s.

‘Veitch’s Form’

Johnstone, Asiatic Magnol. p. 98; 101, 1955

M. salicifolia. Leaves ca 9 × 4 cm, ovate-elliptic, apex acuminate, base broadly cuneate, 10 vein pairs. Per article 21.16, “form” is acceptable in cultivar epithets published prior to 1958.

‘Veitchii’

Treseder’s Nurseries, List, p. 8, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England)

M. ×veitchii. Original pink clone. With priority over ‘Peter Veitch’, though ‘Peter Veitch’ best preserves existing usage. See ‘Peter Veitch’.

‘Veitchii Rubra’

Madlinger, Bull. W. C. Paul Arb. 1, 1960

(M. ×veitchii × uncertain [likely M. ×soulangeanea]). Potentially originated at W.B. Clarke Nursery, San Jose, California before 1960, as M. ×veitchii ‘Rubra’. Flowers wine-red in bud, fading to bright pink as they open. Frank Galyon claimed this represented a ×soulangeana cultivar, McDaniel (1973) believed this to be a veitchii × soulangeana hybrid, suggesting a provisional listing of ‘Veitchi Rubra’. However, neither ‘Veitchii Rubra’ nor ‘Rubra’ can established as a cultivar epithet, as article 21.11 prohibits cultivar epithets comprised entirely of Latin after 1 January 1959.= M. ×veitchii ‘Rubra’.

‘Velvet and Cream’

Cistus Nursery catalog, p. 64, Fall 2011

M. laevifolia. New Zealand. Buds velvety, flowers fragrant, cream colored. Leaves smaller than type. Listed in the catalog as ‘Velvet & Cream’, but use of the ampersand is not permissible under Article 21.18, and should be transcribed as “and” according to Article 35.8.

‘Velvet Cascade’

Cistus Nursery catalog, p. 90, Spring 2014

M. laevifolia. Eric Sannor. Introduced ca 2014. Habit slightly weeping. Flowers white, fragrant.

‘Velvet Cloak’

Cistus Nursery mail order catalog, p. 90, Spring 2010

M. figo var. crassipes. Flowers deep red. Compare ‘Port Wine’, but inner tepals red as opposed to cream.

‘Venus’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, accessed 9 Dec 2019

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Pickard’s Ruby’ × ‘JURmag1’). Michael Gottschalk, Weinheim, Germany, ca 2017. Flowers reddish-pink, 14-16 cm diameter. Long flowering duration, up to 12 days.

‘Vera’

Loudon, Arb. Frut. Brit. 1: 262, 1838

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum. Cultivated in Horticultural Society of London’s Garden, 1834.

‘Verban’

Arb. Bull. Univ. Wash. 10 (4): 14, 1947

M. ×soulangeana. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Verbanica’.

‘Verbanica’

Leroy, Cat. p. 79. 1873, Angers, France

M. ×soulangeana. Slow-growing. Late-flowering. Flowers with entire outside deeper pink, inside pure white. 11 × 5 cm = M. ×soulangeana ‘Pelton’; = M. ×soulangeana ‘Verban’

‘Vico Multipetal’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018.

M. sargentiana. Sir Peter Smithers. Flowers pale pink. 24 tepals. M. sargentiana var. robusta (seedling B). Must = ‘Multipetal’. “Vico” is likely in reference to his estate, Vico Morcote. See ‘Multipetal’.

‘Victoria’

L. H. Bailey, Hortus 381, 1930

M. grandiflora. Leaves very red-rusty on lower surface. From Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.

‘Villa Carlotta’

Magnolien und Tulpenbäume, p. 132, 2019

M. figo var. crassipes. Flowers creamy-yellow with purple rim appearing from early spring through summer.

‘Villa Taranto’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 Dec 2019

M. dawsoniana. Propagules from a large M. dawsoniana growing at Villa Taranto, Lake Maggiore, Italy.

‘Vin Rouge’

Louisiana Nurseries catalog, p. 98, 1994-1996

(M. liliiflora × M ×veitchii). Young leaves bronzy-red, veins and stipules red. Flowers dark wine-red, heavy-textured. Likely a Gresham hybrid of limited distribution.

‘Virginia Watson’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 17, 1992

(M. virginiana × M. ×wieseneri). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI, 1980. Habit similar to but more spreading than typical M. virginiana. Leaves similar to M. virginiana but broader. Flowers pure white; stamens bright crimson, as in the pollen parent. 8 tepals. Strong, pleasant fragrance intermediate between the parents. Cup-shaped flowers are borne upright at the end of the twig. The cultivar epithet references the specific epithets of the parents (M. ×wiseneri was referred to as M. ×watsonii during this time period).

‘Voungii’

Regel, Cat, Pl, Hort. Aksakov., p. 88, 1860

M. grandiflora. Nomen nudum.

‘Vulcan’

Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 44: 51, 1992

(M. campbellii × M. liliiflora). Mark Jury, New Zealand. Small tree. Flowers large, brilliant ruby-red. Floriferous, precocious.

‘Vulcan’s Forge’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 Dec 2019

(‘Star Wars’ × ‘Vulcan’). Hybridized by Michael Gottschalk and selected by Phillipe de Spoelberch and Koen Camelbeke, Belgium. Early flowering with large, bright pink flowers.

‘Vulden’

Magnolia 40(1) [Issue 77]: 17, 2005

(M. denudata × ‘Vulcan’). Vance Hooper, Duncan & Davies Nurseries, New Plymouth, Taranaki, New Zealand. Upright when young, rounded with age. Height estimated to 10 m. Flowers burgundy-red, fading to lilac purple towards the tips. Inner tepals muted purple. Tepals ca 11 × 6 cm. Early flowering. Fruity fragrance. = M. ‘Shirazz’. Marketed as SHIRAZZ.

‘W.B. Clarke’

J. Clarke Nursery Co. wholesale price list, p. 14, 1965-66

M. salicifolia. Fast growing, upright. Flowers white, fragrant. Profuse bloomer.

‘Wada’

Gossler Farms Nursery catalog, p. 14, 1988-89, Springfield, Oregon

M. denudata. Flowers smaller than type, similar to ‘Pristine’, but has the same number of tepals as M. denudata. Seems distinct from ‘Wada’s Japanese Clone’.

‘Wada’s Arboreal Form’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p, 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. stellata. Nomen nudum. Eisenhut website lists as kobus. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958.

‘Wada’s Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 13, ca 1973, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. virginiana. Broad-leaved. Flowers at a young age.

‘Wada’s Form’

Morton Arb. Bull. 34: 22, 1959

M. kobus. Not established. Per article 21.16, “form” is prohibited in cultivar epithets published after 1958. See ‘Wada’s Memory’.

‘Wada’s Japanese Clone’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 139, 1994

M. denudata. Introduced by K. Wada, Hakoneye Nurseries, Japan. Flowers pure white, late season.

‘Wada’s Memorial’

Kruessmann, Index Tremontensis P. 75. 1970, Dortmund Botanic Garden, Germany

M. kobus. See ‘Wada’s Memory’.

‘Wada’s Memory’

Arb. Bull. Univ. Wash. 22: 20, 1959

(M. kobus × M. salicifolia). Introduced in 1940. Erect, dense, compact habit. Young leaves tinged red. Flowers white, to 18 cm diameter, drooping. To 7” diameter. Flowers drooping. = M. denudata ‘Japanese’; = M. kobus ‘Wada’s Form’; = M. kobus ‘Wada’s Memorial’

‘Wada’s Picture’

Newsl. Amer. Magnol. Soc. 2 (1): 2-3, 1965 [as M. denudata ‘Wada’s Picture’]

See ‘Picture’.

‘Wada’s Snow White’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 20, 1984

(M. denudata × M. salicifolia). Hybridized and introduced by Koichiro Wada. Vigorous. Flowers produced at an early age. Pure white, fragrant. A variegated sport of this apparently exists and is under evaluation by Piet Vergeldt Nursery. = M. ‘Snow White’.

‘Wagner’

Magnolia 31(2) [Issue 60]: 24, 1996

M. grandiflora. Bob Adams, Shelbyville, IN. Found in Columbus, IN in a strip between highway and sidewalk. Hardy, surviving without foliar damage in temperatures as low as -15 F. Leaves smaller than typical.

‘Wakehurst’

Hilliers Man. of Trees and Shrubs, Ed. 2, 1973

M. campbellii Raffillii Group. Compare ‘Charles Raffill’ but darker flowers.

‘Wakehurst Seedling’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 73: 353, 1948

M. sprengeri var. diva. Exhibited by Sir Henry Price, Wakehurst Place, Ardingly, Sussex, England. Flowers pink inside, purple outside. Occasionally listed as ‘Wakehurst’ (Callaway 1994), but prefer ‘Wakehurst Seedling’ to avoid conflict with M. campbellii Raffillii Group ‘Wakehurst’. However, this epithet is still not ideal as it implies a relationship to M. campbellii Raffillii Group ‘Wakehurst’, in violation of Art. 21 Rec. 21H. Uncertain as to extent of distribution.

‘Warm Fuzzies’

Cistus Nurseries catalog, p. 67, Spring 2014

M. laevifolia. Introduced ca 2013. Upright, dense. Dark hairs to leaves, stems, buds.

‘Washington Arboretum Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 2, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. acuminata var. subcordata. Likely seedlings from Washington Arboretum. No description. Not established (Article 27.1).

‘Washington Park Clone’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 149, 1994

M. dawsoniana. Flowers deep red. Broad tepals. Supposedly originated at the Strybing Arboretum, San Francisco, CA, but the institution had no records confirming this in 2020. Based on the name either Washington Park Arboretum or Washington Park near Hoyt Arboretum must have played some role in the selection or distribution of this selection.

‘Waterlily’

Morton Arb. Bull. 14: 23, 1939 and 15: 24, 1940

M. stellata. Selected by Guy Nearing as an open pollinated seedling of a M. stellata growing at Guyencourt Nurseries, Guyencourt, DE, ca 1929, with M. ×soulangeana initially suspected as the pollen parent. Introduced by Tingle Nursery, ca 1940. Pyramidal, upright habit. Flowers appearing a week later than typical M. stellata. Per Treseder (1978), the second cultivar to receive this name. For Jacobson (1996), one of four clones. ‘Water Lily’ in Hilliers Man. of Trees and Shrubs, Ed. 2. 1973 is potentially a distinct clone with larger flowers and more tepals. A review of material in cultivation currently under this name should be initiated.

‘Watermelon’

lunaplant.de website, http://lunaplant.de, accessed 9 Dec 2019

(‘Caerhays Belle’ × ‘Genie’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Flowers large, reddish-pink, to 20 cm diameter.

‘Wayside Apricot’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Flowers white and yellow, hint of apricot.

‘Weatherby’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 85, 1994

M. macrophylla. Selected at Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, Louisiana, for exceptional flower quality. Listed in Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 160, 2000. As M. macrophylla var. ashei ‘Weatherley’. I am of the opinion that this was not a distinct cultivar and the name emerged following confusion of the botanical authority for M. macrophylla var. ashei (Weatherby) with a cultivar epithet at Louisiana Nursery. See also advertisement from Salter Tree Farm (Madison, Florida, USA) in Magnolia 17(1):6, 1981 which lists a “Magnolia ashei (Weatherby).” Additionally, young plants of M. macrophylla var. ashei are known to flower profusely, which would be consistent with the description of “exceptional flower quality”. Probably = seedlings of M. macrophylla var. ashei.

‘Wedding Vows’

Rhod., Cam. & Mag 63: 24, 2012

(M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Big Dude’). Dennis Ledvina, Green Bay, WI. Fastigiate. Large, ivory-white flowers with long, trailing tepals.

‘Weeping Girl’

(M. liliiflora × M. stellata). Unpublished name. Per Koen Camelbeke, Haacht, Belgium on 24 Jan 2019: “Pendulous lower branches; not M. ×proctoriana ‘Slavins Snowy’; probably seedling stock; looks like DeVos/Kosar hybrid; flowers pointed”. Uncertain as to degree of distribution.

‘Werrington’

Hilliers Man. of Trees and Shrubs, Ed. 2, 1973

M. campbellii. Flowers dark lilac-purple or magenta, to 25 cm diameter, 12-14 tepals. From the same George Forrest collection as ‘Lanarth’. Presumably referrable to M. campbellii subsp. mollicomata, now generally considered synonymous with M. campbellii.

‘Westonbirt’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 Apr 2018.

M. sprengeri. See ‘Westonbirt Diva’.

‘Westonbirt Diva’

Magnolia 49(2) [Issue 96]: 42-46, 2014

M. sprengeri var. diva (Open-pollinated seedling of M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’). Westonbirt Arboretum, England. Seedling from original Wilson introduction of M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Diva’ at Caerhays Castle. Dark pink flowers, lighter and more purple to the interior. Was propagated by Piet Vergeldt Nursery circa 2005 as “Sir George Holford” prior to registration. = M. sprengeri ‘Westonbirt’

‘Westonbirt Hope’

Magnolia 56(1) [Issue 107]: 46, 2021

(Open-pollinated seedling of M. sprengeri var. diva ‘Westonbirt Diva’ [presumably by M. campbellii]). Westonbirt Arboretum, England, 1990. Seedling of the renowned ‘Westonbirt Diva’, exhibiting characteristics of M. campbellii. Flowers to 22 cm diameter, red-wine in color, cup-and-saucer form, appearing 7-10 days later than M. campbellii, and with fewer tepals (generally no more than 12).

‘Whispering Pink’

Klehm’s Song Sparrow Farm and Nursery website, http://www.songsparrow.com, Accessed 10 Jan 2019.

Dennis Ledvina hybrid introduced by Roy Klehm, Barrington, IL. Rounded, ca 3 × 3m in 10 years. Flowers with rose-pink stripe. 16 tepals. Fragrant.

‘White’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 6, circa 1965, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. sargentiana. Flowers fading to pure white. Uncertain if distinct from ‘White Clone’.

‘White’

Iufer Landscape Co., nursery list, 1961, Salem, Oregon

M. stellata. Nomen nudum. Probably = M. stellata.

‘White’

Kelsey & Dayton, Stand. Pl. Names, Ed. 2, p. 377, 1942

M. ×soulangeana. In “Standardized Plant Names” (1942), Kelsey and Dayton adopted the rule that “species and natural varieties only are entitled to Latin or botanical names, and that all hybrids … horticultural varieties, and the like should receive suitable English or common names”. This is inconsistent with the ICNCP (Article 21.6), which allows for cultivar epithets in Latin form when established prior to 1 January 1959. For this reason, the cultivar epithets published by Kelsey and Dayton are moved to synonymy. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba’.

‘White Caviar’

Warners Nurseries website. http://warners.com.au/our-plants/plant/magnolia-white-caviar. Accessed 13 Feb 2018

A trademarked trade designation not freely available for use as a cultivar epithet. See ‘MICWC’.

‘White Clone’

Treseder’s Nurseries catalog, p. 10, circa 1973, Truro, Cornwall, England

M. sargentiana. Flowers iridescent pearly white. Unsure if distinct from M. sargentiana ‘White’.

‘White Elegance’

Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018

M. kobus. M. Maeno. Flowers larger than typical for species.

‘White Ensign’

Magnolia 52(2) [Issue 102]: 11, 2017

M. globosa (Open-pollinated seedling of M. globosa). William Gueterbock, Dorset, England. Flowers of weeping habit and size typical of M. globosa, but tepals colored white to pale pink with red rim.

‘White Flounces’

Magnolia 31(1) [Issue 59]: 18, 1996

M. sieboldii subsp. sieboldii. Harry Heineman, Scituate, MA, 1991, from a seedling at the Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, MA. Flowers double, opening flat to 10 cm diameter, 16-24 tepals.

‘White Form’

Jour. Roy. Hort. Soc. 76: 218, 1951

M. campbellii. Flowers large, tepals 12, cream, obovate, 13 × 8 cm. Stamens purplish-rose. Raised from seed sent from India; plant originated at Caerhays Castle, Cornwall, England. Presented in article as “White form F.C.C.”, not as a cultivar.

‘White Giant’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 3, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

M. ×soulangeana (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×soulangeana ‘Picture’). From Wada, Japan. Vigorous. Flowers white, slightly flushed pink.

‘White Lips’

Magnolia 31(1) [Issue 59]: 18-19, 1996

See ‘Leda’.

‘White Mystery’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

M. ×veitchii (M. denudata × M. ×veitchii). Arboretum Wespelaar, Belgium. Originated as a gift from Karl Flinck, Sweden. Flowers white, with base light rose-pink.

‘White Rose’

Magnolia 25(1) [Issue 47]: 20, 1989

M. ×loebneri (Open-pollinated seedling of M. ×loebneri ‘Ballerina’). Flowers average 22 tepals, 4 × 2 cm, remaining firm, flaring upward and outward, never becoming flat or droopy.

‘White Saucer’

Arb. Bull. Univ. Wash. 10 (4): 14. 1947

M. ×soulangeana. See M. ×soulangeana ‘Alba’.

‘White Star’

Westbury Rose Co., Spring 1958 catalog. p. 6, Westbury, Long Island, New York

M. stellata. See M. stellata ‘Halliana’.

‘White Stardust’

RareFind Nursery catalog, p. 45, 2016

M. ×loebneri. From Tom Dodd Nursery, Semmes, AL. Purple new growth.

‘Whitesides Largest’

Magnolien und Tulpenbäume, p. 266, 2020

M. virginiana var. virginiana. Bill Smith, Richmond, VA, before 2015. Large, reliably evergreen form. Though evergreen tendency is more commonly associated with var. australis, the glabrous young twigs of this plant suggest it is a selection of var. virginiana. Sometimes referred to as ‘Whiteside Giant’.

‘Whopper’

Magnolia 17(1) [Issue 31]:15, 1981

M. macrophylla. J. C. McDaniel, Urbana, IL, late 1970s. Flowers with 3 sepaloid tepals and 12 petaloid tepals measuring up to 20 × 13 cm. Purple ring to throat of flower.

‘Wildcat’

Gardiner. Magnolias: A Gardener’s Guide, p. 260, 2000

M. ×loebneri. Selected by Larry Langford, Gibson, TN, from a batch of Magnolia kobus var. borealis seed sent by William Seidl. Flowers soft pink. 52 tepals measuring 10-12.5 cm in length. Flowering at the same time as other cultivars of M. ×loebneri and over a six-week period. Flowers resemble pompom chrysanthemums.

‘William Watson’

Magnolia 31(1) [Issue 59]: 19, 1996

M. ×wieseneri (M. ×wieseneri × M. obovata). Sir Peter Smithers. Chance seedling of M. ×wieseneri, probably pollinated by a nearby M. obovata. Leaves and flowers larger than the seed parent. Named in honor of William Watson, Assistant Curator at Kew in 1889, for whom the nothospecies of M. obovata and M. sieboldii was named (as M. ×watsonii) before later moved to synonymy with the earlier published M. ×wieseneri.

‘Willowleaf’

M. laevifolia. Bobby Green, Fairhope, AL circa 2005-2007. Leaves narrower than type. Per Mr. Green in 2019, only a few plants were grown and propagated. It performed well in Zone 8 soils, but not in containerized production situations. Appeared on Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 April 2018. Uncertain if this is the same plant due to sparse distribution.

‘Willowleaf Bay’

Magnolia 28(1) [Issue 53]: 17, 1992

M. virginiana var. australis. Larry Lowman, Ridgecrest Nursery, Wynne, AR. Narrower leaves than typical of species, densely clustered near the ends of the branches, giving the tree a more refined foliage texture.

‘Willowwood’

Blackburn, Gard. Jour. 2: 44, 1952

M. ×loebneri. Floriferous selection at Willowwood Arboretum, Gladstone, NJ. Flowers to 18 cm diameter, 11-14 tepals.

‘Wim Rutten’

Magnolia 49(1) [Issue 95]: 40, 2014

(‘Forrest’s Pink’ × ‘Marillyn’). Selected by Philippe de Spoelberch, Belgium. Seed originated from MSI seed exchange 1996#13. Upright oval ca 8 m in 17 years. Tepals beetroot purple at base, becoming grey-purple when fully open, to 19 cm. Named for Wim Rutten (1940-2006) founder of magnoliastore.com. = M. ‘Maarten’.

‘Winchester’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 686, 2009

M. grandiflora. See ‘Tulsa’.

‘Windsor Beauty’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 Dec 2019

M. salicifolia. British selection. Floriferous. Clean foliage.

‘Winelight’

Otto Eisenhut Nursery catalog, p. 2, 1989, Ticino, Switzerland

(M. ×soulangeana × M. ×veitchii). Gresham hybrid (JG#15, LA#129) selected by John Allen Smith, Chunchula, AL. Flowers with 9 thick tepals to ca 13 cm in length, reddish purple at the base, becoming lighter at the tip. Flowering later than most Gresham hybrids.

‘Wisley Star’

Magnolias in Art and Cultivation, p. 158, 2014

M. kobus. E. K. Janaki Ammal colchicine induced polyploid raised at Wisley. 15 strap-like tepals with an overall star-like appearance to the flower. = M. kobus ‘Wisley Stardust’

‘Wisley Stardust’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 701, 2009

M. kobus. Though the selection has been marketed as ‘Wisley Stardust’, ‘Wisley Star’ is the intended name per Jim Gardiner (pers. comm. 3 Dec 2020). See M. kobus ‘Wisley Star’

‘Wood Dance’

Eisenhut Nursery website. http://www.eisenhut.ch/. Accessed 9 Mar 2018

([M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Lennei’] × [M. ×brooklynensis ‘Woodsman’ × ‘Sundance’]). Flowers pale pink, tinged yellow towards base.

‘Woodlawn’

Callaway, The World of Magnolias, p. 81, 1994

M. tripetala. J. C. McDaniel, Urbana, IL. Flowers larger than average, fruits exceptionally large. Original tree in Woodlawn Cemetery, Urbana, IL.

‘Woodsman’

J. C. McDaniel in Plants and Gardens 30 (1): 75-76, 1974

M. ×brooklynensis (M. acuminata ‘Klassen’ × M. liliiflora ‘O’Neill’). Hybridized by J. C. McDaniel, Urbana, IL. Flowering later than M. ×soulangeana. Fertile hybrid. Hardier plant with larger flowers compared to M. liliiflora.

‘Workman’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 20, 1984

M. grandiflora. Compact, to 6 × 4.5 m in 25 years. Leaves small, 15 × 8 cm, wavy edges, light brown indumentum. Flowers white, stamens red at base, 10-11 tepals to 8 × 5 cm.

‘Wyoming No 25’

M. ×soulangeana. Nomen nudum. Unpublished, unregistered name. Appears to be a working name for an unreleased selection at Wyoming Nurseries, OH likely now lost to cultivation.

‘Xiangfei’

Journal of China Flower & Penjing 2017, 8:16-17

(‘Xinhanxiao’ × M. guangdongensis). Hybridized and selected by Wang Jing (Palm Eco-Town Development Co., Ltd., China). Large shrub to small tree. Flowers white with light red base, fragrant, 6-7 cm in diameter.

‘Xiangxue’

Magnolia 53(2) [Issue 104]: 13, 2018

(‘Xinhanxiao’ × M. guangdongensis). Hybridized by Qiang-min Zhao (Palm Eco-Town Development Co, LTD, China) in 2012. Small tree or large shrub. Flowers with 10-12 tepals, 3.5 cm in length. Flowers fragrant, most profuse in January and March, with remontancy until summer or autumn.

‘Xiaoxuan’

Magnolia 52(1) [Issue 100]: 22, 2017

(M. stellata ‘Waterlily’ × ‘Xinhanxiao’). Semi evergreen shrub, compact, to 1.5-2 m in height with similar spread. Flowers cup-shaped, 9-10 tepals, outside red-pink with darker base (RHS 55B). Flowering late spring to early autumn (Shenzhen, China).

‘Xinhanxiao’

Unpublished name. Characteristics uncertain. Parent of ‘Xiangfei’, ‘Xiangxue’, ‘Xiaoxuan’, and ‘Yunshang’. Maybe = ‘Danxin Hanxiao’, though difficult to confirm without description.

‘Yaeko’

Burncoose Nurseries website. http://www.burncoose.co.uk. Accessed 8 Mar 2018

(‘Anne Rosse’ × M. liliiflora). Tetsuo Magaki. Flowers reddish-purple, large, 9-12 tepals.

‘Yandong’

Magnolia 53(2) [Issue 104]: 13, 2018

(M. cylindrica ‘Lv Xing’ × M. denudata ‘Lamp’). Hybridized by Ya-ling Wang (Xi’an Botanical Garden). Small, compact tree. Flowers cup-shaped, ca 11.5 cm in diameter with 20-26 tepals. White with reddish-pink base. Late march to early April (Xi’an, China).

‘Yellow Bird’

Magnolia 17(2): 30, 1981

M. ×brooklynensis (M. ×brooklynensis ‘Evamaria’ × M. acuminata var. subcordata). Brooklyn Botanic Garden. Compact tree with upright yellow flowers. Flowering with leaves, but earlier than typical for M. acuminata.

‘Yellow Buddha’

Magnolia 35(2) [Issue 67]: 1-13, 2000

M. delavayi. Seedling selected by Kunming Botanic Gardens, China, ca 2000. Distinguished from type based on six yellow inner tepals and three green outer tepals.

‘Yellow Fever’

Magnolia 20(1) [Issue 37]: 20, 1984

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). Ken Durio, Opelousas, LA. Large, upright habit. Flowers yellow with light pink flush on outside of the tepals, fading to ivory cream as they open. Flowers appear before foliage. Fragrant.

‘Yellow Garland’

Magnolia 21(2) [Issue 42]: 12, 1986-7

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). David Leach, Madison, OH. Flowers yellow with yellow-green midrib. 6 tepals.

‘Yellow Joy’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 679, 2009

(M. acuminata var. acuminata ‘Fertile Myrtle’ × M. denudata ‘Sawada’s Cream’). Selected by Pat McCracken, Zebulon, NC. Sister seedling of ‘Butterflies’. Flowers lighter yellow in color.

‘Yellow Lantern’

Magnolia 21(2) [Issue 42]: 12, 1986-7

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × M. ×soulangeana ‘Alexandrina’). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Upright, symmetrical tree, with a single leader. Flowers clear, even lemon yellow, without green striping, appearing well before leaves. Flowers as large and long-lived as ‘Alexandrina’ and retaining the ‘tulip’ shape until they shatter. Flinck (1991) and Oozeerally et al. (2014) list seed parent instead as M. acuminata var subcordata ‘Trade Form’.

‘Yellow River’

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). Piet Vergeldt Nursery B.V. website (http://www.magnoliastore.com). Accessed 6 Apr 2018.

Chinese introduction. Flowers yellow. Fast growing, shrubby form. See ‘Fei Huang’.

‘Yellow Sea’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 679, 2009

(M. acuminata × M. denudata). Carl Ferris Miller. Compare M. ‘Elizabeth’, but slower growing.

‘Yellow-Green No 1’

Dirr, Manual of Woody Landscape Plants, p. 679, 2009

M. acuminata. Louisiana Nursery, Opelousas, LA. Sister seedling to M. ‘Green Beret’. As ‘Yellow Green #1’. Symbols are prohibited in cultivar epithets (Art. 21.19). Use of “No” as replacement for “#” is acceptable (Art 35.8).

‘Yoda’

KiwiFlora website, http://kiwiflora.com, Accessed 9 December 2019

(‘Star Wars’ × ‘Genie’). Vance Hooper, New Zealand. Compact, upright tree. Flowers pale pink to pure white with darker base. Compare ‘Star Wars’, but smaller. Potentially in use as a trade designation (see ‘MGYOD209A’), though at current, a trademark does not currently appear to be claimed on the cultivar epithet so potentially available. Provisionally accepted. = M. ‘MGYOD209A’; = M. ‘Stellar Ruby’.

‘Yu Deng’

M. denudata. Unpublished name. Seed parent of ‘Hong Yu’. Presumably of Chinese origin but characteristics uncertain.

‘Yuanbaobao’

Magnolia 52(1) [Issue 100]: 21, 2017

M. ×soulangeana (M. ×liliiflora ‘Hongyuanbao’ × M. ×soulangeana). Selected by Zhejiang A&F University Nurseries, China. Shrubby tree with erect flowers intermediate between parents, dark purple-red on outside, lighter on the inside. Flowering early march for 3-4 weeks (Hangzhou, China).

‘Yuchelia’ [1] Incertae sedis

Magnolia 24(2) [Issue 46]: 10, 1989

(M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × M. figo). Phil Savage, Bloomfield Hills, MI. Closely resembles Magnolia acuminata var. subcordata parent, though lacks sepals, instead exhibiting greenish reduced sepaloid tepals. At least three distinct selections or groups have used the cultivar epithet ‘Yuchelia’: [1] Yellow-flowered plants referable to ‘Miss Honeybee’; [2] a little documented cross with one plant later named ‘Moonchimes’, and [3] a clone with flowers referable to ‘Daybreak’. The first two resulted from Phil Savage breeding projects in the mid-late 1980’s as intersectional hybrids between Sect. Yulania and Sect. Michelia. Savage (1989) listed these both under the name “× Yuchelia”, apparently as a novel temporary name not intended to serve as either a nothogenus or cultivar epithet. The origin of the third is disputed, though often attributed to Savage. An undated Louisiana Nurseries catalog (circa 1995-1997), p. 248, lists what must be unnamed seedlings of this same cross: ‘2-B’, 4-D’, and ‘6-F’. The former had not flowered, whereas the latter two were described as having yellow flowers.

‘Yuchelia’ [2] Incertae sedis

Magnolia 24(2) [Issue 46]: 10, 1989

(M. ×soulangeana ‘Brozonnii’ × M. doltsopa). The less common of Phil Savage’s two “× Yuchelia” crosses. “Yuchelia” was not presented or intended as a cultivar epithet for this selection. At least one resulting plant was named and sold by Louisiana Nurseries in the mid 1990’s (see ‘Moonchimes’). Per Dick Figlar (pers. comm, 2019), it seems unlikely that this would = the ‘Yuchelia’ [3] referable to ‘Daybreak’, as offspring between M. ×soulangeana ‘Brozonni’ and M. doltsopa probably would neither inherit much pink flower pigment nor be triploid.

‘Yuchelia’ [3]

Rhod., Cam. & Mag. 67: 157, 2016

([Purported] M. acuminata var. subcordata ‘Miss Honeybee’ × M. figo). Compare ‘Daybreak’, but with creamy color to inner tepals. Triploid. Parentage and origin disputed due to stark contrast with “Yuchelia” referable to ‘Miss Honeybee’ (See ‘Yuchelia’ [1]). Believed to have originated from Phil Savage’s cross of M. acuminata var. subcordata × M. figo in the late 1980s. ‘Yuchelia’ should not be established as a cultivar epithet for this selection due to the ease of confusion with two other Phil Savage Yulania × Michelia intersectional hybrids often utilizing the same name.

‘Yujin Hanxiao’

Int. Dendrol. Soc. Yearbook, p. 52, 2013

Chinese introduction. Evergreen. Red flowers.

‘Yunn Fiona’

M. laevifolia. Small creamy white starry flowers. (Luc De Jonge, unpublished data, 2020). Probably shorthand for “yunnannensis Fiona” to separate from the campbellii type of Wills. Uncertain as to degree of distribution. = M. laevifolia ‘Fiona’.

‘Yunshang’

Magnolia 53(2) [Issue 104]: 14, 2018

(‘Xinhanxiao’ × M. laevifolia). Hybridized by Dan-feng Yan (Palm Eco-Town Development Co, Ltd, China). Evergreen shrub or small tree. Flowers white with yellow-green base, 5-7 cm in diameter. Flowering February to March (Guangdong, China) with remontancy from June-August.

‘Zeal’

lunaplant website, http://lunaplant.de, Accessed 10 Dec 2019

(‘Pegasus’ × M. campbellii ‘Darjeeling’). John Gallagher. Flowers clear light-pink, 14-15 tepals.

‘Zhuanzhuan’

Magnolia 53(2) [Issue 104]: 14, 2018

(M. compressa × M. laevifolia). Selected at Shenzhen Fairy Lake Botanical Garden, China, in 2007. Large evergreen shrub or small tree to 3-4 m. Flowers cream to pale yellow, fragrant, 5-6 cm diameter, 9 tepals. Feb-Mar (May) in Shenzhen, China.

‘Zi Chen’

Magnolia 55(1) [Issue 106]: 16-19, 2020

M. sprengeri var. diva. Xi’an Botanical Garden, China, 2008. Flowers large, deep pink, fragrant, 12-18 tepals.

‘Ziyun’

Magnolia 53(2) [Issue 104]: 15, 2018

(M. cylindrica ‘Lv Xing’ × M. liliiflora). Ya-ling Wang, Xi’an Botanical Garden, China. Compact tree to 3-4 m. Flowers 9-10 cm in diameter, consisting of 9-10 tepals: 3 sepaloid (green, reduced) outer 6-7 petaloid (white with purple-red midrib and base). Flowering late march to early April (Xi’an, China).

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  • McDaniel, J.C. 1973 Variety in Evergreen Magnolias Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 9 3 6

  • McDaniel, J.C. 1974a Travels with Magnolias in England and America, 1973–1974 Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 10 17 20

  • McDaniel, J.C. 1974b Magnolia cylindrica: a Chinese Puzzle Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 10 3 7

  • McDaniel, J.C. 1978 Marketing Magnolias Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 14 22 23

  • McDaniel, J.C. 1978b Gresham Hybrids at Gloster Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 14 24

  • Meyer, F.G. 1997 Magnoliaceae 3 10 Flora of North America Editorial Committee Flora of North America vol 3 Oxford University Press Oxford

  • Millais, J.G. 1927 Magnolias Longmans & Co. London

  • Nianhe, X., Yuhu, L. & Nootebloom, H.P. 2008 Magnoliaceae 48 91 Wu, Z. & Raven, P. Flora of China vol. 7 Missouri Botanical Garden Press St. Louis, MO

  • Oozeerally, B., Gardiner, J. & Spongberg, S.A. 2014 Magnolias in Art & Cultivation Kew Publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

  • Pampanini, R. 1916 Le Magnolie (Continuazione) Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 4.a 1 101 107

  • Parris, J.K., Ranney, T.G., Knap, H.T. & Baird, W. 2010 Ploidy Levels, Relative Genome Sizes, and Base Pair Composition in Magnolia J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 135 6 533 547 doi: 10.21273/jashs.135.6.533

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  • Parris, J.K. 2011 Magnolia: Polyploidy, Genome Size, and Refinement of Protocols for Micropropagation (MS Thesis) Clemson University Clemson, SC

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    • Export Citation
  • Rankin, G. 1999 Magnolias: A Care Manual Laurel Glen San Diego, CA

  • Robinson, M. 2003 Magnolia stellata - The Species and The Cultivars Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 54 42 47

  • Robinson, M. 2005 New New Zealand Magnolia Cultivars, Michelias and Manglietias Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56 17 24

  • Savage, P.J. 1989 Magnolias in Michigan: Part IV Magnolia 24 2 5 10

  • Shaw, W. 2018 The Magnolias of Brooklyn Botanic Garden Rhod, Cam & Mag 69 9 13

  • Smithers, P. 1979 Instant Large-flowered Magnolias Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc 15 2 3 10

  • Treseder, N. 1978 Magnolias Faber and Faber London

  • Yinger, B. 2007 When the Magnolias Don’t Freeze Magnolia 42 1 1 6

Contributor Notes

I am in debt to the world’s Magnolia community for much of the information presented here. In no particular order, I would like to specifically acknowledge Tony Aiello, Tony Avent, Ian Baldick, Andrew Bunting, Koen Camelbeke, Erland Ejder, Dick Figlar, Jim Gardiner, James Garnett, Ethan Guthrie, Bobby Green, Ryan Hammes, Pam Hayward, Rich Hesselein, Vance Hooper, Jack Johnston, Luc De Jonge, Yong-Shik Kim, Mark Konlock, Tom Krenitsky, Larry Langford, Ray Larson, Stefan Lura, Richard Olsen, Greg Paige, Kevin Parris, Greg Payton, Ron Rabideau, Wayken Shaw, Tom Trzebiatowski Jr., John Weagle, Mark Weathington, Charles Williams, and Mike Yanny for their willingness to answer a plethora of my clarifying questions over the past few years, which have undoubtedly led to a stronger final product. Pam Hayward and David Chalkley also provided support in copy-editing various drafts of this document. I would also like to thank the staff of the Sterling Morton Library for their support in reference acquisition.

Some cultivars listed in this article are considered proprietary products, subject to trademark, and/or originate with and are sold by specific vendors. Mention of such is for reference purposes and does not constitute endorsement or approval by the Author or The Morton Arboretum.

M.S.L. is the corresponding author. E-mail: mlobdell@mortonarb.org.

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  • McDaniel, J.C. 1973 Variety in Evergreen Magnolias Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 9 3 6

  • McDaniel, J.C. 1974a Travels with Magnolias in England and America, 1973–1974 Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 10 17 20

  • McDaniel, J.C. 1974b Magnolia cylindrica: a Chinese Puzzle Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 10 3 7

  • McDaniel, J.C. 1978 Marketing Magnolias Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 14 22 23

  • McDaniel, J.C. 1978b Gresham Hybrids at Gloster Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc. 14 24

  • Meyer, F.G. 1997 Magnoliaceae 3 10 Flora of North America Editorial Committee Flora of North America vol 3 Oxford University Press Oxford

  • Millais, J.G. 1927 Magnolias Longmans & Co. London

  • Nianhe, X., Yuhu, L. & Nootebloom, H.P. 2008 Magnoliaceae 48 91 Wu, Z. & Raven, P. Flora of China vol. 7 Missouri Botanical Garden Press St. Louis, MO

  • Oozeerally, B., Gardiner, J. & Spongberg, S.A. 2014 Magnolias in Art & Cultivation Kew Publishing, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew

  • Pampanini, R. 1916 Le Magnolie (Continuazione) Bull. Soc. Tosc. Ort. 4.a 1 101 107

  • Parris, J.K., Ranney, T.G., Knap, H.T. & Baird, W. 2010 Ploidy Levels, Relative Genome Sizes, and Base Pair Composition in Magnolia J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 135 6 533 547 doi: 10.21273/jashs.135.6.533

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Parris, J.K. 2011 Magnolia: Polyploidy, Genome Size, and Refinement of Protocols for Micropropagation (MS Thesis) Clemson University Clemson, SC

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Rankin, G. 1999 Magnolias: A Care Manual Laurel Glen San Diego, CA

  • Robinson, M. 2003 Magnolia stellata - The Species and The Cultivars Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 54 42 47

  • Robinson, M. 2005 New New Zealand Magnolia Cultivars, Michelias and Manglietias Rhod. with Cam. & Mag. 56 17 24

  • Savage, P.J. 1989 Magnolias in Michigan: Part IV Magnolia 24 2 5 10

  • Shaw, W. 2018 The Magnolias of Brooklyn Botanic Garden Rhod, Cam & Mag 69 9 13

  • Smithers, P. 1979 Instant Large-flowered Magnolias Newsl. Amer. Mag. Soc 15 2 3 10

  • Treseder, N. 1978 Magnolias Faber and Faber London

  • Yinger, B. 2007 When the Magnolias Don’t Freeze Magnolia 42 1 1 6

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