International Registration of Cultivar Names for Unassigned Woody Genera January 2010–February 2013

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  • 1 Brooklyn Botanic Garden, 1000 Washington Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11225-1099, USA

During the period Jan. 2010 to Feb. 2013, four cultivar names in unassigned woody genera were registered. Individuals introducing new cultivars of ornamental plants are encouraged to register these names with a view to nomenclatural stabilization. A directory of International Registration Authorities and list of the unassigned woody genera is available from the American Public Gardens Association, 351 Longwood Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348, USA; <www.ishs.org/sci/icra.htm>. Brooklyn Botanic Garden is the current International Registration Authority for unassigned woody ornamentals and can be contacted via our designated website: <www.bbg.org/research/cultivar_registration>.

Chilopsis lineraris ‘Brightip’. Registered 26 June 2012. Registrant: Shari S. Kelly, Kelly Green Trees, P.O. Box 10, Marana, AZ 85653-0100, USA. Chilopsis lineraris ‘Brightip’ originated as a chance seedling in cultivation observed by Shari Storm Kelly in July 1993 at 14399 N Wentz Road, Marana, AZ. This new cultivar differs from other Chilopsis lineraris cultivars in having a longer flowering period (early spring to first frost) and distinctive bi-color flowers, and by producing very few to no seedpods and no viable seeds. It was introduced commercially in 1998 by Kelly Green Trees and goes under the trademark name Lois Adams. This tree cultivar is moderately fast growing to a mature height of 5–8 m, drought and heat tolerant, adaptable to poor soils, and cold hardy to Zone 7. A specimen standard, including photographs, for this cultivar has been deposited at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Herbarium (BKL).

Stachyurus ‘Carolina Parakeet’. Registered 23 Jan. 2013. Registrant: Mark Weathington, JC Raulston Arboretum, NC State University, Campus Box 7522, Raleigh, NC 27695-7522, USA. This cultivar occurred as a sport of Stachyurus chinensis ‘Magpie’, observed in 2005 and selected in June 2008. It is a wide-spreading and arching upright, multi-stemmed shrub with an estimated height at 10 years of 3 m and a spread of 4 m. Stachyurus ‘Carolina Parakeet’ is distinguished from its parent by a central chartreuse variegation of the leaf and more vigorous growth. Other identifying characteristics include new leaves opening with a reddish blush and pendant flower spikes of yellow flowers to 18 cm opening in late winter to early spring. The cultivar is hardy in USDA zones 5 to 10 and was introduced commercially in 2010 at the NC Nursery & Landscape Association Summer Trade Show. A photograph of the cultivar has been deposited at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Herbarium (BKL). Although ‘Magpie’ is commonly identified as a cultivar of S. chinensis, both it and ‘Carolina Parakeet’ have longer flower spikes (12–18 cm) than the S. chinensis species (5–10 cm) and may actually be hybrids of S. praecox and S. chinensis. Because of this uncertainty, ‘Carolina Parakeet’ is registered as a Stachyurus cultivar of unknown specific affinity.

Pyracantha ‘Golden Paradise’. Registered 27 Jan. 2013. Registrant: Andrew Parker, Pondside Nursery, Chelmsford, Essex, United Kingdom (mailing address: 5 Evelyn Road, Willows Green, Great Leighs, Essex CM3 1QQ, UK). Pyracantha ‘Golden Paradise’ occurred as a chance seedling observed by Andrew Parker in 2010 at Pondside Nursery where other Pyracantha cultivars have been grown and are possible parents. These include P. ‘Orange Glow’, P. coccinea ‘Red Column’, and P. ‘Mohave’. Pyracantha ‘Golden Paradise’ is distinguished by yellow to golden leaves, which have previously not been reported for the genus. The plant is evergreen and about 1 m tall with a half-meter spread after three years growth; it is reasonably fast growing and quite dense in form. Leaf color is unaffected by three different soil types in which it has been grown, is mostly yellow in summer and less intense in winter and in part-shade. New leaves in late summer to autumn have a red tinge. The plant’s stems bear thorns and it has white flowers in early summer; fruits are orange to red berries. A specimen and photographs of this cultivar have been deposited at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Herbarium (BKL).

Cercis chinensis ‘Kay’s Early Hope’. Registered 4 Feb. 2013. Registrant: Mark Weathington, JC Raulston Arboretum, NC State University, Campus Box, 7522, Raleigh, NC 27695-7522, USA. This cultivar occurred as a chance seedling in cultivation at the JC Raulston Arboretum based on wild collected material from Hubei Province, China. The seedling was observed in 2007, selected in Apr. 2008 and first propagated in 2009. It has flowered for two years after propagation. Estimated height at 10 years is 5 m with a spread of 3.5 m. Cercis chinensis ‘Kay’s Early Hope’ is a multi-stemmed large shrub or small tree of medium growth rate, and is distinguished by very early and long-lasting flowering – starting in late February/early March in North Carolina and continuing for up to 8 weeks. The plant is considered hardy in USDA zones 5 to 10 and was introduced commercially in 2009 at the NC Nursery & Landscape Association Summer Trade Show. A photograph of the cultivar has been deposited at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden Herbarium (BKL).

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