Book Reviews

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  • 1 Department of Entomology Kansas State University Manhattan

Aphids as Crop Pests. H.F. van Emden and R. Harrington (editors). 2007. CAB International, CABI, Nosworthy Way, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8DE UK. 717 pages with 148 figures and 28 tables. $290.00, Hardcover. ISBN: 978-0-85199-819-0

Aphids are among the most destructive insect pests of agricultural and horticultural cropping systems worldwide. However, there has never been a comprehensive reference that adequately addresses in sufficient detail the issues associated with aphids, such as taxonomy, biology, dispersal, chemical control, insecticide resistance, population dynamics, monitoring, viral transmission, cultural, and biological control. Well, the book Aphids as Crop Pests, edited by Helmut F.

Aphids as Crop Pests. H.F. van Emden and R. Harrington (editors). 2007. CAB International, CABI, Nosworthy Way, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8DE UK. 717 pages with 148 figures and 28 tables. $290.00, Hardcover. ISBN: 978-0-85199-819-0

Aphids are among the most destructive insect pests of agricultural and horticultural cropping systems worldwide. However, there has never been a comprehensive reference that adequately addresses in sufficient detail the issues associated with aphids, such as taxonomy, biology, dispersal, chemical control, insecticide resistance, population dynamics, monitoring, viral transmission, cultural, and biological control. Well, the book Aphids as Crop Pests, edited by Helmut F. van Emden and Richard Harrington, is really the first comprehensive book available to provide an abundance of information pertaining to the many facets of aphids. It is an excellent, definitive reference book with 31 chapters written by an international group of contributors, principally from North America and Europe. The chapters include taxonomic issues; population genetic issues; life cycles and polymorphism; host–plant selection and feeding; nutrition and symbiosis; growth and development; aphid movement; predators, parasitoids, and pathogens; chemical ecology; insecticide resistance; coping with stress; population dynamics; feeding injury; transmission of plant viruses; chemical control; cultural control; host–plant resistance; biological control; monitoring and forecasting; integrated pest management and introduction to IPM case studies; IPM case studies (Brassicas); IPM case studies (Berry Crops); IPM case studies (Cotton); IPM case studies (Leafy Salad Crops); IPM case studies (Grain); IPM case studies (Seed Potato); IPM case studies (Sorghum); IPM case studies (Cucurbits); IPM case studies (Deciduous Fruit Trees); IPM case studies (Tropical and Subtropical Fruit Trees); and decision support systems.

Each of the chapter authors provides in-depth descriptions of each topic with a listing of pertinent references to which the reader can refer for further information. I found the references in the insecticide resistance chapter to be very useful. One section that was appealing to me based on my own interests was the chapter on chemical control, in which the modes of action of the various insecticide chemical classes used against aphids were described. Furthermore, the references have been helpful in my own extension and research programs associated with explaining to growers the importance of rotating insecticides with different modes of action so as to avoid the potential for resistance.

The book Aphids as Crop Pests is an extremely valuable contribution to the understanding of the biology of many aphid pests worldwide, their pest status, and how to control them. Despite the cost, this book should be on the bookshelf of anyone conducting research with aphids, including faculty and extension entomologists and even those not affiliated with aphid research.

Raymond A. CloydDepartment of Entomology Kansas State University Manhattan