‘Tribeca’ Hybrid Tomato; Fla. 8124C and Fla. 8249 Breeding Lines

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  • 1 University of Florida, Gulf Coast Research and Education Center, 14625 CR 672, Wimauma, FL 33598
  • 2 University of Florida, North Florida Research and Education Center, 155 Research Road, Quincy, FL 32351
  • 3 University of Florida, Plant Pathology, 1453 Fifield Hall, Gainesville, FL 32611

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‘Tribeca’ is a fresh market hybrid tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) that has resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and heat-tolerant fruit setting (HT). ‘Tribeca’ has performed well on the peninsula of Florida where its ability to set fruit under high temperatures makes it an attractive cultivar choice even when TSWV is not a major production issue. It appears well adapted to the southeastern United States where TSWV has been problematic, and it has done well in trials in Turkey and some other eastern European countries. Inbred Fla. 8124C is the TSWV-resistant parent and has moderate HT. Inbred Fla. 8249, the other parent, has good H-7 fruit setting ability.

Origin

The pedigree of ‘Tribeca’ hybrid, tested as Fla. 8363, is shown in Figure 1. Fla. 8249 is the seed parent and the main source of HT fruit setting. The HT is in the background of both parents that led to Fla. 8249. The HT of Fla. 7756 came from Fla. 7236 and the HT in the other parent could have come from Fla. 7324 and/or Fla. 7236. The HT of Fla. 7236 was derived from Fla. 7156, which in turn was derived from ‘Campbell 28’ (C28). Fla. 7324 is the HT parent in ‘Equinox’ (Scott et al., 1995). Besides HT, Fla. 8249 has the n-4 nipple-tip blossom scar that originated in NC 8276 (Barten et al., 1994). C9 is a never-ripe inbred from a never-ripe line, Austin Fletcher, crossed with ‘Florida MH-1’ (MH1) (Crill et al., 1971). Other parents have been described previously: 648, ‘Suncoast’ (Scott et al., 1985), and 74VF18 (Scott et al., 1989). Fla. 8124C is an F7 inbred that was selected from the cross that became hybrid ‘Fla. 7964’ whose pedigree is published (Scott et al., 2004). It is the source of tomato spotted wilt resistance that traces back to the South African cultivar Stevens (Stevens et al., 1996). Fla. 8124C also has moderate HT that traces to Fla. 7324, which was used as a recurrent parent three times as TSWV resistance was moved from ‘Stevens’. Fla. 8124C has large fruit size that is derived from Fla. 7777, a large globe type with Fla. 7060 (Scott et al., 1989) and ‘Suncoast’ (Scott et al., 1985) in its background.

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Pedigree of ‘Tribeca’ hybrid tomato.

Citation: HortScience horts 44, 2; 10.21273/HORTSCI.44.2.471

Description

‘Tribeca’ has a determinate (sp) vine with medium vigor. Overall, maturity is early-midseason with early production greater than heat-sensitive cultivars under high-temperature growing conditions. The jointed pedicels attach to fruit that are flat–round in shape, have uniform shoulders (u or ug), and have smooth blossom scars conferred in part by the n-4 gene from Fla. 8249 and the n-2 gene from Fla. 8124C (Barten et al., 1994). Fruit firmness is comparable to that of other cultivars presently grown in Florida and the southeast (Table 1). Exterior color of ‘Tribeca’ was relatively dark red as indicated by lower L values and hue angles compared with several Florida-grown cultivars (Table 1). The internal L and hue angle values were either comparable or less than those of commercial Florida cultivars indicating color to be similar or darker red, respectively. Fruit are usually free of white tissue formation in the pericarp, but some white tissue can form under fertilizer stress conditions. Fruit flavor has been rated by the senior author as 3 = good on a 1 to 5 scale ranging from 1 = poor to 5 = excellent. Flavor would be in a similar range as that of widely grown Florida tomatoes such as ‘Sebring’, ‘Florida 91’, and ‘Florida 47’. ‘Tribeca’ has had consistently good yield and fruit size in north Florida where TSWV is often a serious threat to production (Table 2). In Fall 2006, it was comparable to six cultivars, including five resistant to TSWV, for marketable total and extralarge fruit, percentage of marketable fruit, and fruit weight. In Spring 2007, TSWV was prevalent in the trial and yields of the two susceptible cultivars Phoenix and Florida 47 suffered compared with the resistant cultivars. ‘Tribeca’ had yields and fruit size comparable to the seven TSWV cultivars and was only less than ‘Fletcher’ for percentage of marketable fruit. In Fall 2007, the tomatoes were subjected to relatively severe heat stress and infection with Tomato yellow leaf curl virus. ‘Tribeca’ was numerically at the top of the trial for marketable yield; extralarge production was significantly greater than eight cultivars with only ‘Bella Rosa’ having similar production of extralarge fruit. Total yield was comparable to four cultivars and significantly more than the other five. The percentage of marketable fruit and fruit size for ‘Tribeca’ was comparable to four cultivars and greater than five others (Table 2). ‘Tribeca’ also performed well in a yield trial at GCREC in Fall 2006 (Table 3). TSWV has not been problematic on the Florida peninsula, but ‘Tribeca’ may be useful there for its HT alone. The HT of ‘Tribeca’ is evident in the relatively good performance in the fall crops (Tables 2 and 3). Fla. 8124C has globe-shaped fruit, whereas Fla. 8249 has medium-large, flat–round fruit.

Table 1.

Firmness, external color, and internal color measurements for tomato hybrids grown over two seasons in Balm, FL.

Table 1.
Table 2.

Total and extralarge marketable fruit, marketable percentage, and fruit weight for tomato hybrids at Quincy, FL, over three seasons.

Table 2.
Table 3.

Marketable yield, fruit size, and culls for selected tomato hybrids in Fall 2006 at Balm, FL.

Table 3.

Disease Resistance

Resistance to TSWV is conferred by the Sw-5 gene, which is heterozygous in ‘Tribeca’ (Table 4). Fla. 8124C is the source of the Sw-5 gene as indicated by the linked molecular marker CT220F/R (Fig. 2). The hybrid is homozygous-resistant to fusarium wilt races 1 and 2 incited by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Sacc.) Snyder & Hansen (I, I-2 genes); homozygous-resistant to Gray leafspot incited by Stemphyllium spp. Webber (Sm gene); and heterozygous-resistant to verticillium wilt race 1 incited by Verticillium dahliae Kleb. (Ve gene). Fla. 8124C is the source of resistance to verticillium wilt because Fla. 8249 is susceptible. Stem scar water uptake for ‘Tribeca’ and Fla. 8249 appeared to be low (Table 5), which would indicate tolerance to bacterial soft rot incited by Erwinia carotovora Jones (Smith et al., 2008). However, in an earlier experiment, Fla. 8124C had high stem scar water uptake (Scott and Bartz, unpublished data). A hybrid like ‘Tribeca’ between low (Fla. 8249) and high (Fla. 8124C) water uptake parents would be predicted to have intermediate uptake (Smith et al., 2008). Further testing is needed to determine if water uptake is low or intermediate for ‘Tribeca’. ‘Tribeca’ is tolerant to most common fruit disorders, including graywall where little to none has been seen under conditions conducive to this disorder. Fla. 8124C has only moderate tolerance to graywall, whereas Fla. 8249 appears highly tolerant. There is some zippering in both parents and the hybrid, but zippering expression is usually not excessive. ‘Tribeca’ and its parents have good tolerance to all types of fruit cracking and this has been evident in the high percentage of marketable fruit that was reported previously.

Table 4.

Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) incidence for tomato hybrids at Quincy, FL, Spring 2007.

Table 4.
Table 5.

Water uptake for mature green fruit of tomato genotypes grown at Balm, FL, Fall 2007.

Table 5.
Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Polymerase chain reaction fragments with primer CT220F/R cut with AseT. Lanes 1 and 15 are ‘Horizon’, the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV)-susceptible control. Lanes 2 and 16 are Fla. 8251, the TSWV-resistant control. Lane 8 is Fla. 8124 × Fla. 7946, a heterozygous-resistant hybrid, and Lanes 3 to 7 and 9 to 14 are from individual plants of Fla. 8124C. For information on this marker, tightly linked to the Sw-5 locus, see Garland et al. (2005).

Citation: HortScience horts 44, 2; 10.21273/HORTSCI.44.2.471

Availability

Seed of ‘Tribeca’, Fla. 8124C, and Fla. 8249 are being released through Florida Foundation Seed Producers Inc., Greenville, FL 32443 (http://ffsp.net). Vilmorin seed company has been given exclusive rights to produce commercial seed of ‘Tribeca’. Small quantities of seed for research purposes are available from J.W. Scott.

Literature Cited

  • Barten, J.H.M., Scott, J.W. & Gardner, R.G. 1994 Characterization of blossom-end morphology genes in tomato and their usefulness in breeding for smooth blossom-end scars J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 119 798 803

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  • Crill, P., Strobel, J.W., Burgis, D.S., Bryan, H.H., John, C.A., Everett, P.H., Bartz, J.A., Hayslip, N.C. & Deen, W.W. 1971 Florida MH-1, Florida's first machine harvest fresh market tomato Fla. Ag. Exp. Sta. Circ. S-212 1 12

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    • Export Citation
  • Garland, S., Sharman, M., Persley, D. & McGrath, D. 2005 The development of an improved PCR-based marker system for Sw-5, an imporant TSWV resistance gene of tomato Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 56 285 289

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Scott, J.W., Everett, P.H., Bryan, H.H., Gull, D.D., Howe, T.K., Stoffella, P.J. & Volin, R.B. 1985 ‘Suncoast’—A large-fruited home garden tomato Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Circ. S-322 1 7

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    • Export Citation
  • Scott, J.W., Olson, S.M., Bartz, J.A., Maynard, D.N. & Stofella, P.S. 2004 Fla. 7964 hybrid tomato resistant to spotted wilt virus Rpt. Tomato Genet. Coop. 54 51

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Scott, J.W., Olson, S.M., Bryan, H.H., Howe, T.K., Stoffella, P.J. & Bartz, J.A. 1989 Solar Set: A heat tolerant, fresh market tomato hybrid Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Circ. S-359 1 10

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Scott, J.W., Olson, S.M., Howe, T.K., Stoffella, P.J., Bartz, J.A. & Bryan, H.H. 1995 ‘Equinox’ heat-tolerant hybrid tomato HortScience 30 647 648

  • Smith, S.M., Scott, J.W., Bartz, J.A. & Sargent, S.A. 2008 Diallel analysis of fruit water absorption in tomato, a contributing factor in postharvest decays J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 133 55 60

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Stevens, M.R., Heiny, D.K., Rhoads, D.D., Griffiths, P.D. & Scott, J.W. 1996 A linkage map of the tomato spotted wilt virus resistance gene Sw-5 using near isogenic lines and an interspecific cross. International Symposium on Tospoviruses and Thrips of Floral and Vegetable Crops, Taichung, Taiwan, Nov. 7–11, 1995 Acta Hort. 43 385 392

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    • Export Citation

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Contributor Notes

Thanks to Cathy Provenzano, Jose Diaz, Jackie Snell, and Rosa Ayala for technical assistance.

To whom reprint requests should be addressed; e-mail jwsc@ufl.edu.

  • View in gallery

    Pedigree of ‘Tribeca’ hybrid tomato.

  • View in gallery

    Polymerase chain reaction fragments with primer CT220F/R cut with AseT. Lanes 1 and 15 are ‘Horizon’, the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV)-susceptible control. Lanes 2 and 16 are Fla. 8251, the TSWV-resistant control. Lane 8 is Fla. 8124 × Fla. 7946, a heterozygous-resistant hybrid, and Lanes 3 to 7 and 9 to 14 are from individual plants of Fla. 8124C. For information on this marker, tightly linked to the Sw-5 locus, see Garland et al. (2005).

  • Barten, J.H.M., Scott, J.W. & Gardner, R.G. 1994 Characterization of blossom-end morphology genes in tomato and their usefulness in breeding for smooth blossom-end scars J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 119 798 803

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Crill, P., Strobel, J.W., Burgis, D.S., Bryan, H.H., John, C.A., Everett, P.H., Bartz, J.A., Hayslip, N.C. & Deen, W.W. 1971 Florida MH-1, Florida's first machine harvest fresh market tomato Fla. Ag. Exp. Sta. Circ. S-212 1 12

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Garland, S., Sharman, M., Persley, D. & McGrath, D. 2005 The development of an improved PCR-based marker system for Sw-5, an imporant TSWV resistance gene of tomato Australian Journal of Agricultural Research 56 285 289

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Scott, J.W., Everett, P.H., Bryan, H.H., Gull, D.D., Howe, T.K., Stoffella, P.J. & Volin, R.B. 1985 ‘Suncoast’—A large-fruited home garden tomato Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Circ. S-322 1 7

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Scott, J.W., Olson, S.M., Bartz, J.A., Maynard, D.N. & Stofella, P.S. 2004 Fla. 7964 hybrid tomato resistant to spotted wilt virus Rpt. Tomato Genet. Coop. 54 51

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Scott, J.W., Olson, S.M., Bryan, H.H., Howe, T.K., Stoffella, P.J. & Bartz, J.A. 1989 Solar Set: A heat tolerant, fresh market tomato hybrid Fla. Agr. Exp. Sta. Circ. S-359 1 10

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Scott, J.W., Olson, S.M., Howe, T.K., Stoffella, P.J., Bartz, J.A. & Bryan, H.H. 1995 ‘Equinox’ heat-tolerant hybrid tomato HortScience 30 647 648

  • Smith, S.M., Scott, J.W., Bartz, J.A. & Sargent, S.A. 2008 Diallel analysis of fruit water absorption in tomato, a contributing factor in postharvest decays J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 133 55 60

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Stevens, M.R., Heiny, D.K., Rhoads, D.D., Griffiths, P.D. & Scott, J.W. 1996 A linkage map of the tomato spotted wilt virus resistance gene Sw-5 using near isogenic lines and an interspecific cross. International Symposium on Tospoviruses and Thrips of Floral and Vegetable Crops, Taichung, Taiwan, Nov. 7–11, 1995 Acta Hort. 43 385 392

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
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