‘Gulfcrimson’ Peach

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  • 1 University of Georgia, Horticulture Department, P.O. Box 748, Tifton, GA 31793
  • | 2 U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Southeastern Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory, 21 Dunbar Road, Byron, GA 31088
  • | 3 University of Florida, Department of Horticultural Sciences, 1143 Fifield Hall, Hull Road, Gainesville, FL 32611

‘Gulfcrimson’ peach is jointly released for grower trials by the U.S. Department of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service (Byron, GA), Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station, and Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. The “Gulf” prefix indicates this variety was developed for the lower coastal plain, which is largely the Gulf of Mexico region, but also includes a small portion of the Atlantic Coast from North Carolina to Florida.

Trees of ‘Gulfcrimson’ are vigorous, semispreading, and produce an attractive, sweet-tasting, yellow, and nonmelting flesh fruit intended for the fresh fruit market. It is expected to produce fruit with tree-ripened taste while retaining firmness for longer shelf life than fruit from conventional melting flesh cultivars. ‘Gulfcrimson’ is suggested for trial as an alternative to ‘June Gold’ peach in north Florida and south Georgia.

Origin

‘Gulfcrimson’ originated in Attapulgus, GA, from a 1999 cross of AP96-8 × AP98-5 and was selected and propagated in 2001 and tested as AP01-7 at Attapulgus. Both parents are of complex origin (Fig. 1).

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Pedigree of ‘Gulfcrimson’.

Citation: HortScience horts 43, 5; 10.21273/HORTSCI.43.5.1596

Description

Standards and methods used in this program to evaluate selections have been described (Beckman and Krewer, 1999; Beckman et al., 1995). Trees of ‘Gulfcrimson’ are estimated to require 400 chill units (Sherman and Lyrene, 1998). This is based on full bloom consistently occurring just before ‘Sunlite’ nectarine at Attapulgus where full bloom occurs most seasons in mid-February (Table 1). ‘Gulfcrimson’ has fruited well where the coldest month averages 12 to 14 °C (Sharpe et al., 1990) and in colder locations in the absence of spring frosts. Thus, we expect this new peach to be adapted in areas where ‘Flordaking’ and ‘Sunlite’ nectarine have been grown successfully. Fruit ripen in mid- to late May at Attapulgus, ≈90 to 95 d after full bloom (Table 1) and usually with ‘June Gold’ peach (Table 2). Trees are vigorous, productive, and without alternate bearing. Trees set a high number of flower buds, have few blind nodes (Richards et al., 1994), and exhibit little bud failure (bud drop) before bloom (Weinberger, 1967). Fruit thinning is required in the absence of thinning by spring frost to size fruit and prevent limb breakage.

Table 1.

Tree performance and fruit characteristicsz of ‘Gulfcrimson’ (Attapulgus, GA, 2002 to 2006).

Table 1.
Table 2.

Tree performance and fruit characteristicsz of ‘Gulfcrimson’ and ‘June Gold’ (Attapulgus, GA, 2002 to 2006).

Table 2.

‘Gulfcrimson’ fruit have been observed on the original seedling and budded trees since 2001. Fruit are medium size, round to slightly elongated, and attractive (Fig. 2), averaging ≈138 g (67 mm diameter) when thinned to ≈15 cm apart. Buttons have not been observed in fruit of ‘Gulfcrimson’. Commercially ripe fruit exhibit 80% red over a deep yellow to orange ground color. Fruit shape is round with a recessed tip. The flesh contains, in some years, red-pigmented flecks in the outer flesh on the sun-exposed side of the fruit, but there is little or no red in the flesh at the pit. Flesh texture is smooth and without strings but is clingy to the pit even when fully ripe. Flesh is firm with good sweetness (10% to 12% soluble solids) and does not brown readily on bruised or cut surfaces. Pits are medium small and have not been observed to split even when crop loads were low.

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Typical fruit of ‘Gulfcrimson’.

Citation: HortScience horts 43, 5; 10.21273/HORTSCI.43.5.1596

Leaves have small reniform glands. Flowers are showy and pink. Anthers are light red and pollen is bright yellow and abundant. Leaves have shown no bacterial spot [Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni (Sm.) Dye] in test plantings where known susceptible genotypes show typical symptoms.

Comparable in size to ‘June Gold’, ‘Gulfcrimson’ offers some significant advantages over the industry standard. These include superior cropping reliability, fruit shape, red skin blush, appearance, eating quality, firmness, and a significantly reduced incidence of split pits.

Availability

A plant patent has been filed for ‘Gulfcrimson’ and a propagation agreement is available through Florida Foundation Seed Producers, P.O. Box 309, Greenwood, FL 32443. Budwood is indexed free of Prunus Necrotic Ringspot Virus and Prune Dwarf Virus.

Literature Cited

  • Beckman, T.G., Krewer, G., Sherman, W.B. & Okie, W.R. 1995 Breeding moderate chill peaches for the lower coastal plain Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc 108 345 348

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  • Beckman, T.G. & Krewer, G.W. 1999 Postharvest characteristics of moderate-chill peach varieties Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc 112 236 241

  • Gomez, K.A. & Gomez, A.A. 1984 Statistical procedures for agricultural research Wiley New York, NY

  • Richards, G.D., Porter, G.W., Rodriquez, J. & Sherman, W.B. 1994 Incidence of blind nodes in low-chill peach and nectarine germplasm Fruit Var. J. 48 199 202

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  • SAS Institute, Inc 2003 SAS for Windows, Version 9.1 SAS Institute, Inc Cary, NC

  • Sharpe, R.H., Sherman, W.B. & Martsolf, J.D. 1990 Peach cultivars in Florida and their chilling requirements Acta Hort. 279 191 197

  • Sherman, W.B. & Lyrene, P.M. 1998 Bloom time in low-chill peaches Fruit Var. J. 52 226 228

  • Weinberger, J.H. 1967 Studies on flower bud drop in peaches Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci 91 78 83

Contributor Notes

Professor.

Research Horticulturist.

Assistant Professor.

Professor Emeritus.

To whom reprint requests should be addressed; e-mail Tom.Beckman@ars.usda.gov

  • Beckman, T.G., Krewer, G., Sherman, W.B. & Okie, W.R. 1995 Breeding moderate chill peaches for the lower coastal plain Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc 108 345 348

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Beckman, T.G. & Krewer, G.W. 1999 Postharvest characteristics of moderate-chill peach varieties Proc. Fla. State Hort. Soc 112 236 241

  • Gomez, K.A. & Gomez, A.A. 1984 Statistical procedures for agricultural research Wiley New York, NY

  • Richards, G.D., Porter, G.W., Rodriquez, J. & Sherman, W.B. 1994 Incidence of blind nodes in low-chill peach and nectarine germplasm Fruit Var. J. 48 199 202

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • SAS Institute, Inc 2003 SAS for Windows, Version 9.1 SAS Institute, Inc Cary, NC

  • Sharpe, R.H., Sherman, W.B. & Martsolf, J.D. 1990 Peach cultivars in Florida and their chilling requirements Acta Hort. 279 191 197

  • Sherman, W.B. & Lyrene, P.M. 1998 Bloom time in low-chill peaches Fruit Var. J. 52 226 228

  • Weinberger, J.H. 1967 Studies on flower bud drop in peaches Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci 91 78 83

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