(234) Aesculus Pollen Viability and Longevity under Frozen Storage

in HortScience
Authors:
Ann M. Chanon1The Ohio State University, Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster, OH, 44691

Search for other papers by Ann M. Chanon in
ASHS
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Pablo S. Jourdan2The Ohio State University, Horticulture and Crop Science, Columbus, OH, 43210

Search for other papers by Pablo S. Jourdan in
ASHS
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Joseph C. Scheerens1The Ohio State University, Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster, OH, 44691

Search for other papers by Joseph C. Scheerens in
ASHS
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

The genus Aesculus (buckeyes and/or horsechestnuts) is composed of 13 species and a number of interspecific hybrids. Pollen from 11 genotypes from five Aesculus species and the hybrid Aesculus ×carnea were used to develop an in-vitro germination test to evaluate pollen viability under various storage treatments. This test was optimized using samples of both fresh pollen and pollen that had been stored up to 1 year. The most effective medium contained 20% sucrose, 100 mg·L-1 H2BO3, 150 mg·L-1 Ca(NO3)2, and 1% agar. The highest germination percentage was observed at 15 °C across all storage treatments. Fresh pollen germinated in excess of 80% over a wide range of germination temperatures. Based on this, all specimens studied would be good pollen parents. The differences in pollen germination between storage at -20 and -80 °C were nonsignificant, but the duration of the storage period was highly significant. At 3 months, viability remained above 60% for four of the six species/hybrid tested. However, at 12 months, all pollen tested dropped below the threshold for good fruit set based on in-vitro pollen germination. Based on these observations, short-term pollen storage may permit crosses between parents with temporally separate flowering phenologies. However, conventional storage procedures are inadequate to maintain pollen collected from a male parent for crosses in subsequent growing seasons.

  • Collapse
  • Expand

 

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 12 12 2
PDF Downloads 40 40 11