SEVERE CUTBACK OF STOCK PLANT INFLUENCES ROOTING IN SHOOT OF QUERCUS BICOLOR AND QUERCUS MACROCARPA

in HortScience
Authors:
Naalamle Amissah25 Plant Science Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

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Nina Bassuk25 Plant Science Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

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Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of severe stock plant cutback on rooting in two oak species Quercus bicolor and Quercus macrocarpa using two propagation systems, layering and cuttings. In experiment 1, field grown plants were either cutback leaving a 0.04 m (1.6 in.) stump above soil level or left intact (not cutback) ≈1.7 m (66.9 inches) tall. Shoots arising from cutback treatments and intact plants were layered using a field layering technique and air layering respectively. Results showed significantly higher (p < 0.01) rooting percentages in layered propagules arising from severely cutback plants in both species [≈77% in Quercus bicolor and ≈70% inQuercus macrocarpa] compared with air layered shoots arising from intact plants [1% in Quercus bicolor and 0% in Quercus macrocarpa]. In experiment 2, shoots arising from three stock plant heights (severely cutback 0.04 m, cutback 1 m and intact ≈1.7 m plants) were either etiolated or grown in full light and cuttings rooted in a perlite medium under mist. Of the two species studied, propagule position was found to have no significant effect on rooting in Quercus macrocarpa cuttings, but significantly (p < 0.0001) influenced rooting in Quercus bicolor. Rooting was highest 59.3% in cuttings taken from cutback-etiolated stock plants. Comparing just the three cutback levels, rooting was highest (45.2%) in cuttings arising from 0.04 m stumps followed by those from 1 m stumps 7.5% and lastly intact plants 3.8%. The best rooting results were observed in shoots arising from severely cutback stock plants (0.04 m) using the field layering technique.

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