BY THE NUMBERS: ASIAN LONGHORNED BEETLE AND THE NEW JERSEY EXPERIENCE

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  • 1 1Agriculture and Resource Management Agent, Somerset County, Rutgers Cooperative Research and Extension, 88 Lipman Drive, Martin Hall, New Brunswick, NJ 08901
  • | 2 2Agriculture and Resource Management Agent, Union County, Rutgers Cooperative Research and Extension, 88 Lipman Drive, Martin Hall, New Brunswick, NJ 08901
  • | 3 3Agriculture and Resource Management Agent, Middlesex County, Rutgers Cooperative Research and Extension, 88 Lipman Drive, Martin Hall, New Brunswick, NJ 08901
  • | 4 4NJ Program Director, USDA Cooperative Asian Longhorned Beetle Eradication Project, Rahway, NJ 07065

New Jersey has two active quarantines currently under the jurisdiction of the USDA's Cooperative Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) Eradication Project. Encompassing just over twenty (20.2) square miles, these quarantines are located in the northeastern and central coastal regions of the state, in close proximity to the ports of New York, Newark, and Elizabeth. Public education and media outreach have been instrumental in confirming the presence of ALB in New Jersey, as both quarantines are the result of citizens' reports. Twenty five personnel have been directly assigned to this eradication effort, with outside contractors taking up the remaining effort. Nearly 33,000 trees have been inspected, resulting in 11,000 (33%) removals of infested or high-risk host species trees. Major losses have occurred in populations of Norway and red maple, London planetree, and American elm, species which have received widespread praise (and unfortunate over-planting) for their tolerance of urban planting sites. Regulatory Contracts (597) and Compliance Agreements (137) were necessary to formalize the quarantine and to create strong working partnerships between the USDA, municipalities, and industry to gain access to all trees and to control the movement of all “green material” in the quarantine areas. Municipalities currently cooperating in the New Jersey Community Forestry Program have begun offsetting this major deforestation and canopy cover loss with the planting of 2,545 nonhost trees, with full reforestation expected over the next several years. In addition, >22,000 trees have been treated with Imidacloprid as a possible deterrent to any activity or spread of ALB in the Garden State.

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