The Study of Pollen Development in Nine Cultivars of Hazelnut (Corylusavellana)

in HortScience
Authors:
Chantalak TiyayonOregon State University, Horticulture, Corvallis, OR, 97330

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Anita Nina AzarenkoOregon State University, Horticulture, Corvallis, OR, 97330

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Pollen development is an important event in plant reproduction. Hazelnut (Corylus avellana) male flower differentiation starts in summer and pollen shed is in the winter. Hazelnut pollen shed can vary up to 3 months between early to late flowering genotypes. Microsporogenesis and microgametogenesis of hazelnut is not well understood. Pollen development and differentiation of nine genotypes, representing early to late blooming cultivars from the National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Corvallis, Ore., were studied. Catkins were collected weekly from Aug. to Nov. 2002. Tissue sections were examined under the light microscope. Microsporogenesis was divided into five stages: archesporial cells, sporogenous cells and parietal layers, pollen mother cells (PMC), tetrads, and microspores. Microgametogenesis was distinguished between young pollen grains (uninucleate) and mature pollen grains (binucleate). On 4 Aug., cultivars were at different developmental stages of microsporogenesis. Early blooming cultivars had PMCs present. Later-blooming cultivars only contained archesporial cells. PMCs were present in all cultivars by 22 Aug. Microspores were observed on 26 Sept. in all cultivars. This study contributes to a better understanding of male gametophyte development in hazelnut, which has increased our ability to correlate hazelnut pollen development with bloom phenology.

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