(369) Field and Greenhouse Evaluation of Strawberry Genotypes for Tolerance to Black Root Rot Pathogens

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  • 1 Michigan State University, Horticulture, East Lansing, MI, 48824

Black root rot is a widespread disease of strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa Duchnesne) that causes the death of feeder roots and the degradation of structural roots. The major causal organisms of black root rot include Rhizoctonia fragariae Husain and W.E. McKeen, Pythiumspp. and Pratylenchuspenetrans(Cobb) Filipjev and Schuurmans Stekhoven. The current method of control for black root rot is methyl-bromide fumigation; however, methyl bromide is scheduled to be phased out in 2005, and its effects are short-lived in matted-row systems. The objectives of the study were to measure levels of tolerance to black root rot in 20 strawberry genotypes and to determine which pathogens were present in the soil. The genotypes were planted in four blocks each of methyl-bromide fumigated and nonfumigated soil, and were evaluated for crown number, number of flowers per crown, yield, and average berry weight over two years. The results showed that all three pathogens were present in the field, and that there was a significant genotype × fumigation interaction for yield and crown number in both years. The cultivars Bounty, Cabot, and Cavendish, all released from the breeding program in Nova Scotia, displayed tolerance to the pathogens that cause BRR. Greenhouse studies were conducted using a subset of the genotypes to determine if any one pathogen causes more damage than others, and to determine if susceptibility to a particular pathogen varies between genotypes.

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