(247) Genetic and Environmental Effects on Glucosinolate Content in Chinese Cabbage

in HortScience
Authors:
Ji Yeon Kang1University of Illinois, Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, Urbana, IL, 61801

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Khalid E. Ibrahim1University of Illinois, Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, Urbana, IL, 61801

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Doo Hwan Kim2Konkuk University, Horticultural Science, Seoul, 143-701, Korea

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Wha-Jeung Kang3National Horticultural Research Institute, Vegetable Research Division, Suwon, 440-706, Korea

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John A. Juvik1University of Illinois, Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, Urbana, IL, 61801

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Gluconasturtiin is a glucosinolate (GS) present in Chinese cabbage and its breakdown product, phenelethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), inhibits phase I enzyme activation of endogenous carcinogenic compounds and enhances phase II enzyme detoxication, reducing cancer risk and promoting health in humans. This study was conducted to evaluate the interaction between the genotype and the environment to influence GSs in Chinese cabbage. Twenty-five accessions were grown in three environments and tissue quantified for GS levels by HPLC. While gluconasturtiin was observed to be the most abundant GS form, 3-indolylmethyl GS (glucobrassicin) and 1-methoxy-3-indolylmethyl-GS (neoglucobrassicin) were also found. Significant differences were observed among tissues, genotypes and environments in GS concentration and composition. Gluconasturtiin ranged from 0.56 μmol·g-1

DW in leaf tissue of Hau No. 2 to 11.89 μmol·g-1 DW in Chilsung. There were dramatic differences among different tissues of the same genotype with young leaf and root tissues having significantly higher concentrations of gluconasturtiin than other tissues. Gluconasturtiin in Sandong No. 5 ranged from 1.69 μmol·g-1 DW in mature leaves to 18.69 μmol·g-1 DW in root tissue. GS content of the same genotypes in three different environments indicated that plants grown in the greenhouse had higher GS content compared to field grown plants. Results of this study indicate that genotypic variation and the growing environment have substantial effects on GS content in Chinese cabbage. This investigation provides important information for future genetic and molecular studies and has identified Chinese cabbage genotypes that offer superior health benefits to consumers.

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