Position of Source Leaf Affects Translocation and Distribution of C14 Photo-Assimilates in Tomato

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  • 1 National Horticultural Research Institute, Dept. of Vegetable Culture, Suwon, 440-310, South Korea
  • | 2 North Dakota State Univ., Dept. of Plant Sciences, Fargo, ND 58105

The relationship between source leaf position and the photo-assimilate translocation and distribution was characterized for tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) grown in the greenhouse. Three different positions of source leaf on the stem (first node above or below the first fruit cluster and fifth node above the first fruit cluster) were tested for their influence on 14CO2 assimilation and transfer to different parts of the plant. The leaves at the fifth node above the first fruit cluster transferred the highest (57%) proportion of C14 to other plant parts, followed by leaves borne on the first node below the first fruit cluster (50%), and the first node above the first fruit cluster (39%). In all treatments, fruits served as the strongest sink for C14, followed by stem, leaf, and root tissues. The leaf borne on the fifth node above the first fruit cluster transferred the largest amount of C14 to the second fruit cluster.

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