Evaluation of Turfgrass Selections for Resistance to Fall Armyworms (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

in HortScience
Authors:
S.K. BramanUniversity of Georgia, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Georgia Experiment Station, Griffin, GA 30223-1797

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R.R. DuncanUniversity of Georgia, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Georgia Experiment Station, Griffin, GA 30223-1797

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M.C. EngelkeTexas Agricultural Experiment Station, 17360 Coit Road, Dallas, TX 75252

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Turfgrass selections including 21 paspalums (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz) and 12 zoysiagrasses (Zoysia sp.) were compared with susceptible `KY31' tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and more resistant common bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon Pers.) and common centipedegrass [Eremochloa ophiuroides (Munro.) Hack] for potential resistance to fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith)], an occasionally serious pest of managed turf. Turfgrass and pasture grasses annually suffer sporadic damage by this pest, often severe in the Gulf Coast states. Resistant grasses offer an alternative management tool for the fall armyworm, reducing the need for pesticide use. Laboratory evaluations assessed the degree of antibiosis and nonpreference present among more than 30 turfgrass genotypes to first and third instar fall armyworms, respectively. Zoysiagrasses exhibiting high levels of antibiosis included `Cavalier', `Emerald', DALZ8501, DALZ8508, `Royal', and `Palisades'. Paspalum selections demonstrating reduced larval or pupal weights or prolonged development times of fall armyworm included 561-79, Temple-2, PI-509021, and PI-509022.

Contributor Notes

Dept. of Entomology. E-mail address: kbraman@griffin.peachnet.edu
Dept. of Crop and Soil Science.
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