Bolting and Growth of Spinacia oleracea L. Can be Altered by Modifying the Photoperiod during Transplant Production

in HortScience
Authors:
Changhoo ChunDepartment of Bioproduction Science, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510, Japan

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Ayumi WatanabeDepartment of Bioproduction Science, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510, Japan

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Toyoki KozaiDepartment of Bioproduction Science, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510, Japan

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Hyeon-Hye KimDepartment of Bioproduction Science, Chiba University, Matsudo, Chiba 271-8510, Japan

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Junya FuseAgricultural Development Department, Taiyo Kogyo Co., Tokyo, 111-0053, Japan

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Spinach (Spinacia oleracea L. cv. Dimple) was chosen to determine whether bolting (i.e., elongation of flower stalks) could be controlled by manipulating the photoperiod during transplant production in a closed system using artificial light. Plants grown under various photoperiods during transplant production were transferred and cultured under natural short photoperiods and artificial long photoperiods. Vegetative growth at transplanting tended to be greater with the longer photoperiod because of the increased integrated photosynthetic photon flux. Bolting initiation reacted qualitatively to a long photoperiod, and the critical photoperiod for bolting initiation was longer than 13 h and shorter than 15 h. The plants grown under a longer photoperiod during transplant production had longer flower stalks at harvest. The long photoperiod and/or high temperature after transplanting therefore promoted flower stalk elongation. Growing plants under a photoperiod that was shorter than the critical photoperiod during transplant production reduced elongation of the flower stalks, thus there was no loss of market value even though the plants were cultured under a long photoperiod and high temperature for 2 weeks after transplanting.

Contributor Notes

Current address: Dept. of Horticulture, Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI 48824-1325.
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