Transplanting Depth Affects Pepper Lodging and Maturity

in HortScience
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  • 1 Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Bowditch Hall, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003
  • | 2 University of Florida, Southwest Florida Research and Education Center, P.O. Drawer 5127, Immokalee, FL 33934
  • | 3 Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, Bowditch Hall, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003

The effects of transplant depth on lodging and yield were evaluated in five experiments in Florida and Massachusetts. `Cherry Bomb', `Jupiter', and `Mitla' pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) transplants were set at three depths so that the soil surface was even with the top of the rootball, the cotyledon leaf, or the first true leaf. Seedlings set to the depth of cotyledon leaves or to the first true leaf lodged less than did those set to the top of the rootball. No yield differences were recorded among treatments in Massachusetts; however, total weight of red fruit was greater in treatments that lodged less in 1 of the 2 years, suggesting that lodging delayed maturity. Soil temperature in Massachusetts declined at the level of the rootball as planting depth increased.

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