467 Mapping Anthocyanin Pathway Genes in Raspberry

in HortScience
Authors:
Courtney A. WeberHorticultural Sciences Dept., New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Cornell University, Geneva, NY 14456

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William Boone
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The role of plant pigments in human health has been under intense scrutiny recently. Anthocyanin pigments have been shown to be powerful antioxidants and may contribute to other areas of human health. In red and black raspberry, Rubus idaeus and Rubus occidentalis, respectively, no less than eight different anthocyanin pigments have been identified. However, the genetics controlling the presence and ratios of the different pigments is poorly understood. Various researchers have identified four loci that impart fruit pigment deficiencies and three loci that affect the pigment ratios. The underlying gene function of these loci is not known. Efforts are under way to map two pigment deficiency loci in red raspberry using bulked segregant analysis. Screening with 800 random primers has produced two markers with >90% and two with >80% correlation to one loci. For the other loci, 10 markers with >80% correlation have been identified. Mapping is ongoing with the first linkage map for raspberry to be presented. Populations to test allelism between sources of pigment deficiency are being evaluated for further mapping of loci of the anthocyanin production pathway. Data on cloning of genes in the anthocyanin pathway based on database sequences with degenerative primers for further elucidation a anthocyanin production in raspberry will be presented.

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