192 Growth Response of Salix nigra Marsh. to Fertilization, Humate Additive, and Mycorrhizae Inoculation in a CU Soil Container Study

in HortScience
Authors:
Jason Grabosky1Dept. of Environmental Horticulture, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0670; 2Cornell Univ., Dept. of Floriculture Ornamental Horticulture, Urban Horticulture Institute, Ithaca, NY 14853

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Nina Bassuk1Dept. of Environmental Horticulture, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0670; 2Cornell Univ., Dept. of Floriculture Ornamental Horticulture, Urban Horticulture Institute, Ithaca, NY 14853

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CU soil is a material primarily composed of clay loam soil and crushed stone designed for use under pavement to promote street tree root growth in a durable pavement section, such as sidewalks or parking lots. One concern is the low total soil fraction from which tree roots can meet nutritive demands. At issue is the long-term nutrient management of street trees once the root zone has been rendered inaccessible due to the pavement wearing surface, although in 3-year field tests, there were no differences found between a CU soil material and an agricultural field control. CU soil treatments were produced in a fractional factorial design with a patent applied for, processed humate additive, a nursery production fertilization treatment, and a mycorrhizae inoculation package of Pt and various VAM species. The mycorrhizae/fertilizer treatment was eliminated for plant availability restrictions. Bare-root seedlings of Salix nigra Marsh. were grown in treatment containers for 5 months. A Minolta SPAD-502 was used to evaluate relative chlorophyll content as an indication of leaf tissue nutrient levels. Plant growth as a function of root dry weight, shoot dry weight, and shoot: root ratio was analyzed. Soil analyses were conducted on media samples collected at the end of the study to evaluate the impact of humate admixes in nutrient availability. The fertilization treatments positively influenced leaf color, shoot weight, root weight, and shoot: root ratio. There was no impact from the mycorrhizae inoculation on leaf color or growth. There was no impact from the humate additive on leaf color or growth. There were no additive effects found in the treatment levels.

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