Crown Gall Resistance in Accessions of 20 Prunus Species

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  • 1 Department of Pomology, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616
  • 2 Department of Pomology, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616
  • 3 Department of Pomology, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616

Crown gall is an important disease of many fruit and nut crops, but little is known about sources of resistance. We screened germplasm from Prunus armeniaca L., P. angustifolia Marsh., P. argentia L., P. avium L., P. besseyi Bailey, P. bokhariensis Schneid., P. brigantica L., P. cerasifera Ehrh., P. cerasus L., P. dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb, P. fruiticosa Pall., P. hortulana Bailey, P. insititia L., P. japonica Thunb., P. mahaleb L., P. persica (L.) Batsch, P. serotina Ehrh., P. simonii Carr., P. sogdiana L., and P. webbii (Spach) Vieh. When either main stems or lateral branches of seedlings were inoculated with strains K12 and C58 of Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Smith and Townsend) Conn., the incidence of resistance was less than 10% except in some accessions of P. mahaleb L. where up to 30% of the plants were resistant. Some resistant plants were identified in other species, with P. insititia L. being the most promising. Symptoms based on presence and size of galls should be allowed to develop for up to 90 days after inoculation to reduce the likelihood of misclassifying plants as resistant when they are slightly susceptible.

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To whom reprint requests should be addressed.Current address: Univ. of Missouri, Dept. of Biological Sciences, 109 Tucker Hall, Columbia, MO 65211-7400.
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