Comparison of Postharvest and Processing Characteristics of Mayhaw

in HortScience
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  • 1 1Department of Horticulture, Louisiana State University, Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
  • | 2 2Department of Food Science, Louisiana State University, Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

Fruits from five mayhaw selections were harvested and frozen at –2 °C. Juice was extracted with a steamer and kept in storage at 5 °C until processing. Percent soluble solids, percent malic acid, initial pH, and color were then determined for postharvest characteristics. 550 mL juice was placed in a 2000-mL beaker and heated until boiling. Dry pectin mixed with a portion of the total sugar equivalent to 5–10 times the weight of the pectin was sprinkled into the boiling juice. Once pectin was in solution, the amount of sugar to obtain a ratio of ≈45 parts fruit: 55 parts sugar was added to the mixture. The mixture was cooked until the soluble solid reading reached 65% and then poured into jars to cool to room temperature. The five mayhaw jellies alone with one commercial apple and one commercial mayhaw were evaluated using a panel preference test. Evaluation was based on a scale from dislike extremely to like extremely. Preference scores indicated that mayhaw jellies were preferred to a commercially available apple jelly. There was a definite preference to deep red colored jellies. The specific varietal jellies were preferred to a commercially available mayhaw jelly.

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