An Evaluation for Pod Calcium Concentration between Eight Commercial Cultivars of Snap Beans and Eight of Dry Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

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  • 1 Dept. of Horticulture, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison WI 53706

We have previously observed significant variation for pod Ca concentration among snap bean genotypes. In the present experiment, we compare pod Ca concentration between snap bean and dry bean genotypes. Eight snap bean cultivars and eight dry bean cultivars were chosen to be evaluated for pod Ca concentration in summers of 1995 and 1996 at Hancock, Wis. The experimental design consisted in randomized complete blocks with three replications in 1995 and six in 1996. Snap and dry beans were planted in June and hand-harvested in August for both experiments. Soil analysis showed 430 ppm of Ca in soil at time of planting. No additional Ca was applied. Plots consisted of 10 plants each. Harvesting was made by collecting a pooled sample of medium size pods from the 10 plants. Ca determinations were made using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Data was presented as mg of Ca per gram of dry weight, pooled from both years, and analyzed using SAS. Results reflected significant differences between genotypes. Checkmate (5.5) showed the highest pod calcium concentrations and Labrador (3.9) the lowest among snap beans. G0122 (5.1) resulted in the highest and Porrillo (3.6) the lowest within dry beans Results were consistent across years. Snap beans (4.6) presented significantly higher pod calcium concentration than dry beans (4.2). Apparently, snap bean genotypes have the ability to absorb calcium from the soil more efficiently than dry bean genotypes, and this phenomenon is not significantly influenced by environmental factors.

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