Yields of Vegetables and Peanut in Rotation Plantings

in HortScience

Crop rotations can reduce problems that occur in monoculture planting systems. In 1990, at Lane, Okla., 0.5 ha of Bernow fine-loamy soil was planted to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). In the following 5 years, bell pepper (Capsicum annuum var. annuum L.), cucumber (Cucumis sativas L.), navy bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), and cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. Capitata group) were planted in one of four rotations after 1, 2, or 3 years of peanut. The first vegetable planting in each annual rotation was followed by either vegetables or peanut in following years. In 3 of the 6 years, peanut or vegetables were planted in each rotation. Peanut yields in the first year averaged 6.6 Mg·ha-1, but were <1.9 Mg·ha-1 thereafter. Yields of the first vegetable planting, which followed 1 or 2 years of peanut, were normal for this location, but were significantly lower after 3 years of peanut. For second or third plantings of vegetables in rotations, yields were reduced up to 50% compared to the first vegetable planting. For most crops, the rotation that had 3 years of peanut followed by 3 years of vegetables generally produced the least cumulative yield. Numbers of sclerotia produced by soilborne plant pathogenic fungi fluctuated over the years, but were the same in the spring of the second and sixth years. Rotating these crops appears to have limited applicability for maintaining high vegetable or peanut yields.

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