IN VITRO SCREENING FOR ANTHURIUM TOLERANCE TO BURROWING NEMATODE, RADOPHOLUS SIMILIS

in HortScience

Burrowing nematode, Radopholus similis, reduces flower-yield-infected anthurium fields. Genetic resistance is one alternative to chemical control of the disease in anthurium. Seventeen commercial anthurium varieties, established in vitro on anthurium nutrient medium, were inoculated with burrowing nematodes to screen for tolerance. Three months after inoculation, plant responses were compared by number of nematodes recovered and by symptom index and plant weight loss with respect to non-inoculated plants. Results show that `Mauna Kea' and `Flamingo' anthuriums are among the most tolerant, while `Ozaki' is one of the most susceptible. These results are consistent with grower field evaluation. Nematode count is positively correlated with symptom index and weight loss. The mechanism of tolerance or resistance of anthurium toward burrowing nematode is unclear. However, due to the fact that burrowing nematode is a migratory endoparasite, a preinfectional resistance or tolerance mechanism is more likely to take place.

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