Scanning Electron Microscope Studies of the Development from Germination to Mature Plant of Some Hardy Terrestrial Orchids

in HortScience
View More View Less
  • 1 1Univ. of Nebraska–Lincoln, Dept. of Horticulture, Lincoln, NE 68583-0724
  • | 2 2ELTE Botanical Garden, Budapest, Hungary
  • | 3 3Univ. of Horticulture and Food Industry, Budapest, Hungary

Cultures of several orchid species [Barlia robertiana (Loisel.), Dactylorhiza fúchsii Soó, D. incarnata (L.) Soó, D. maculata (L.) Soó, D. majalis (Rchb.), D. saccifera (Brong) Soó, D. sambucina (L.) Soó, Gymnadenia conopsea (L.) R.Br., Himantoglossurn hircinum (L.) Spreng., Ophris sphegodes Mill., Orchis coriophora ssp. fragrans L., Orchis laxiflora ssp. palustris Lam., Orchis mascula L., Orchis morio L., Platanthera bifolia (L.) Rich., Spiranthes aestivalis (Poir.) Rich.] were initiated with fresh ripe seeds from desiccated fruit and 4-month-old in vitro seedlings. The medium used for both germination and seedling culture was a modified FAST medium. Samples for the scanning electron microscope (SEM) surveys were taken from the in vitro cultures and some plant materials were collected from their native habit. Samples were observed with a Tesla BS 300 SEM. Seeds ranged from 300 to 450 μm in length and were flask-shaped. The first germination step is opening of the seedcoat, when the first few white cells will be visible. After a few weeks, the apical meristem appears. The young protocorm is covered with numerous translucent rhizoids. In the last stage of germination, the first root and the first true leaf start to develop. After 2 years, they are suitable for transfer ex vitro. Structure of the mature organs and tissues can be examined at this stage.