Strawberry Fruit Temperature Affects Sensitivity to Bruising from Impact and Compression Forces

in HortScience
Authors:
M.D. Ferreira1Horticultural Sciences Dept., Univ. of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611

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S.A. Sargent1Horticultural Sciences Dept., Univ. of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611

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J.K. Brecht1Horticultural Sciences Dept., Univ. of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611

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C.K. Chandler2Agriculture Research Center, Univ. of Florida, Dover FL 33527.

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Individual strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa Duch.) fruits at cooled or ambient pulp temperatures were subjected to compression or impact forces to determine sensitivity to bruising. Fruits were more resistant to compression bruising at lower temperatures, but were more resistant to impact bruising at ambient temperatures. `Chandler' fruits at 1C or 30C were compressed (9.8 N for 2 s); after 24 h @ 24C, bruise volumes were 0.27 cm3 and 0.65 cm3, respectively. Following a single impact from 13 cm, fruits at 1C or 24C had bruise volumes of 0.21 cm3, and 0.10 cm3, respectively. Increasing impact height to 38 cm caused bruise volumes of 0.31 cm3 and 0.16 cm3 for fruits at 1C and 24C, respectively. The potential exists to improve packout quality and efficiency for value-added strawberry packs. Due to greater resistance to impacts at ambient temperatures, strawberries could be bulk-transported to a central facility, and graded and packed on an appropriately designed packing line. Care must be taken to avoid compression bruising at harvest.

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