Safety and Efficacy of Halosulfuron-methyl for Yellow Nutsedge Topkill in Cool-season Turf

in HortScience
View More View Less
  • 1 Department of Horticulture, Forestry, and Recreation Resources, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506
  • | 2 Department of Agronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742
  • | 3 Department of Horticulture, Forestry, and Recreation Resources, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506

Field studies were conducted in Kansas and Maryland to compare the safety and efficacy of halosulfuron-methyl (HM) and bentazon for topkill of yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus L.). Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis L.) and creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris Huds.) treated with single (in Kansas) or sequential (in Maryland) HM (35 to 140 g·ha–1) or bentazon (1120 or 1680 g·ha–1) applications exhibited little injury, and treated turf had acceptable quality in all studies. Bentazon caused an unacceptable reduction in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) quality at ≥5 weeks after treatment in four of five tests. Perennial ryegrass quality declined linearly with increasing HM rates (between 35 and 140 g·ha–1). In Maryland, HM (≥70 g·ha–1) elicited unacceptable perennial ryegrass quality for 2 or 3 weeks; however, in Kansas, quality was unacceptable for ≈1 week. In Kansas, yellow nutsedge topkill by HM (70 kg·ha–1) ranged from 52% to 97%. A single HM application (35, 70, or 140 kg·ha–1) provided > 97% topkill in Maryland. Yellow nutsedge topkill by bentazon (1680 g·ha–1) generally was inferior to that by HM (70 g·ha–1). Chemical names used: 3-(1-methylethyl)-1H-2,1,3-benzothiadiazin-4 (3H)-one 2,2-dioxide (bentazon), methyl 3-chloro-5-(4,6-dimethoxypyrimidin-2-ylcarbamoylsulfamoyl)-1-methylpyrazole-4-carboxylate (halosulfuron-methyl).

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 0 0 0
Full Text Views 133 18 1
PDF Downloads 263 104 2