904 PB 523 THE IMPACT OF THAW RATE AND POST-THAW LIGHT INTENSITY ON FREEZE-THAW INJURY IN POTATO SPECIES

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  • 1 Dept. of Hort., 1575 Linden Dr. Univ. of Wisc.-Madison, Madison, WI 53706

At the University of Wisconsin Biotron facility potted plants of S. tuberosum were frozen slowly (cooling rate of 1°C/h) to -2°C. Following thaw, plants were subjected to either high light (400 umol m-2s-1) or low light (100 umol m-2 s-1). High light caused greater damage which appeared as bleaching of the upper leaves in 2 days following thaw. In another study excised paired leaflet halves of S. tuberosum and S. commersonii were subjected to damaging but sublethal freezing temperatures and thawed either fast (on ice) or slowly (1°C/h). Membrane damage (% ion leakage) was about 2x higher at fast thaw as compared to slow thaw in both cold acclimated and non acclimated tissue. There was greater photosynthetic impairment at slow thaw rate than fast in the non acclimated state, but following acclimation fast thaw was more damaging to photosynthetic function. Respiration in general was less sensitive to freeze-thaw stress as compared to photosynthesis and cell membranes.

Our results show that we could benefit from taking into consideration thaw rate and post-thaw light intensity in developing frost protection plans.

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