260 NITROGEN PARTITIONING IN APPLE IS AFFECTED BY TIMING AND TREE GROWTH HABIT

in HortScience
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Habib KhemiraDept. of Horticulture. Oregon St. Univ., Ag & Life Sci., Corvallis, OR 97331

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Timothy L. RighettiDept. of Horticulture. Oregon St. Univ., Ag & Life Sci., Corvallis, OR 97331

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Anita N. AzarenkoDept. of Horticulture. Oregon St. Univ., Ag & Life Sci., Corvallis, OR 97331

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Young bearing spur (Red-Spur Delicious) and standard (Top-Red Delicious) type apple trees were given one of the following treatments: 120g N applied to the ground in spring (SG), 120g N applied to the ground one month before harvest (PG), 60g N sprayed on the foliage after harvest (FF), 60g N SG and 60g N PG, or 60g N SG and 60g N FE Urea and NH4NO3 depleted in 15N (0.01 atom percentage 15N) were used for foliar and ground applications, respectively. Very little labeled N was present in leaves and fruit with PG applications, but roots, bark, and buds contained substantial amounts of it. Nitrogen from the FF sprays was effectively translocated to buds and bark. Percentage of N from the fertilizer in Sept leaves from spur-type trees that had only 60 g of N in spring was 56% higher than that found in standard-type trees. This figure rose to 180% with 120 g N spring application. Mature fruit showed the same trend. Spur-type trees appeared more responsive to N management practices. In contrast to the above ground structure, small roots of standard-type trees showed more label than those of spur-type trees. The difference was bigger with SG applications. Partitioning of N in the roots was apparently affected by the scion.

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