026 MICROPROPAGATION OF BUTTERNUT, JUGLANS CINEREA

in HortScience
Author: Paula M. Pijut1
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  • 1 USDA Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station, 1992 Folwell Ave., St. Paul, MN 55108

Butternut (Juglans cinerea L.), a native hardwood to the northeastern United States, is a valuable species for its wood and edible nuts. Butternut is becoming endangered in its native range as a result of a virulent fungal (perennial canker) pathogen, Sirococcus clavigignenti - juglandacearum. Micropropagation techniques are being developed to clone disease-resistant specimens. Axillary buds, obtained from 2-3-month old seedlings, were induced to break buds in vitro and form a single shoot when cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 200 mg/l casein hydrolysate, 3% sucrose, and 2 mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine. Roots were initiated on microshoots when cultured on half-strength MS medium containing 100 mg/l casein hydrolysate, 1.5% sucrose, and 0.5 mg/l indole-3-butyric acid for seven days in the dark. Adventitious roots elongated when shoots were placed in the light on the same medium, but with 2% sucrose, and no growth regulators. Rooted plantlets were successfully acclimated ex vitro. These results provide a basis for the development of techniques to micropropagate selected, mature, disease-resistant butternut germ plasm.

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