Ozone Air Pollution Increases Petroleum Spray Oil Phytotoxicity

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  • 1 Kearney Agricultural Center, 9240 South Riverbend Avenue, Parlier, CA 93648
  • 2 Kearney Agricultural Center, 9240 South Riverbend Avenue, Parlier, CA 93648
  • 3 Kearney Agricultural Center, 9240 South Riverbend Avenue, Parlier, CA 93648
  • 4 Department of Pomology, University of California, Davis, CA 95616

Japanese plum (Prunus salicina Lindel. `Casselman') trees exposed to three atmospheric ozone partial pressure treatments were sprayed with a summer application of Volck Supreme oil (1% aqueous solution) to control an outbreak of spider mites (Tetranychus spp.). Phytotoxic effects were observed on the foliage of trees in the plots exposed to ambient or higher atmospheric ozone partial pressures 5 days following spray application. Foliage on trees exposed to 0.044 and 0.081 μPa·Pa-1 ozone [12-h mean (8 Apr. to 12 June 1992)] partial pressures developed water spotting and more foliage abscission than trees exposed to charcoal-filtered air (0.024 μPa·Pa-1 ozone). Thus, ozone air-pollution stress may predispose plants to increased phytotoxicity from summer oils.

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Contributor Notes

Current address: Boyce Thompson Inst. for Plant Research at Cornell Univ., Tower Rd., Ithaca, NY 14853-1801Univ. of California, Cooperative ExtensionDept. of Viticulture and Enology, Univ. of California-Davis.
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