Relationship between Fruit Respiration, Bruising Susceptibility, and Temperature in Sweet Cherries

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  • 1 Pomology Department, University of California, Kearney Agricultural Center, 9240 South Riverbend Avenue, Parlier, CA 93648
  • 2 Pomology Department, University of California, Kearney Agricultural Center, 9240 South Riverbend Avenue, Parlier, CA 93648

Respiration rate and bruising incidence were assessed in new cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivars adapted to high temperatures. `Bing', `Brooks', `Tulare', and `King' respiration rates were evaluated at 0,5,10, and 20C, and bruising susceptibilities at 0, 10, 20, and 30C. `Bing' was the least susceptible to bruising and had the lowest respiration rate at all temperatures. Respiration rate increased with temperature in all cultivars. Impact bruising damage was greatest in all cultivars when fruit flesh was below 10C. Vibration damage was not influenced by fruit temperature. Our results suggest that the cherry cultivars assessed should be handled at temperatures between 10 and 20C during packing to minimize bruising damage. Due to increased respiration rates at higher temperatures, however, fruit should be cooled to 0C within 4 to 6 hours after harvest.

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Univ. of California Cooperative Extension, Tulare County.
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