ALTERNATIVE N FERTILIZATION STRATEGIES FOR PEARS

in HortScience
Authors:
Habib KhemiraDepartment of Horticulture, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR 97331

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T. L. RighettiDepartment of Horticulture, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR 97331

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David SugarDepartment of Horticulture, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR 97331

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A. N. AzarenkoDepartment of Horticulture, Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR 97331

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Current N fertilization practices, where high spring applications are utilized, may lead to excessive vegetative growth. However, high rates may not be required to maximize fruit yield and quality. Therefore, alternative strategies to minimize shoot growth while still providing the N needs of the tree were investigated. Mature `Comice' and `Bosc' pear trees were given one of the following treatments: a spring soil (SS) application of NH4NO3 nitrate at 112.5 kg/ha rate, a similar application in the fall after harvest (FS), a fall foliar (FF) spray of a 7.5% urea solution after harvest (FF), or no N (Control). Trees that received a FF application had the same leaf and fruit N content as control trees, but they yielded more fruit The SS application gave more vigorous trees than FF application. Yield, however, was not different.

A 15N enriched urea solution was applied at harvest as either a foliar spray, soil application, or combination of both treatments to mature `Comice' trees. Flower buds from trees that previously received a foliar treatment had 37% of their N derived from the foliar N application. No labeled N was detected in buds from the soil treatment These results indicate that vegetative and reproductive N requirements of fruit trees may be managed separately.

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