TRANSPORTATION ROUTES FOR LATIN AMERICAN PRODUCE IMPORTS INTO THE UNITED STATES

in HortScience
Authors:
David H. PichaDept. of Horticulture and Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness, LSU Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

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Roger A. HinsonDept. of Horticulture and Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness, LSU Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

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The origin and distribution of counter-seasonal fresh fruit and vegetable imports from Latin America into the U.S. was evaluated. Infrastructure comparisons were made among various U.S. ports of entry capable of receiving perishables. Economic comparisons were made utilizing different transportation routes. Market boundary analyses indicated significant cost savings would result from changing existing transportation routes to certain final U.S. destinations. Currently the port of Philadelphia receives the majority of South American fruit which is mostly shipped break bulk or palletized. South Florida ports (Miami and Port Everglades) receive the majority of Central American and Caribbean fruits and vegetables which are mostly shipped containerized. Interest exists among Latin American exporters to diversify their U.S. ports of entry in order to avoid distribution bottlenecks. Future trade routes will likely see an increased utilization of more economical U.S. Gulf of Mexico ports.

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