Vapor Heat: A Potential Treatment to Disinfest Tropical Cut Flowers and Foliage

in HortScience
Authors:
James D. HansenHawaii Institute of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 461 West Lanikaula Street, Hilo, HI 96720

Search for other papers by James D. Hansen in
ASHS
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
,
Arnold H. HaraHawaii Institute of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 461 West Lanikaula Street, Hilo, HI 96720

Search for other papers by Arnold H. Hara in
ASHS
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
, and
Victoria L. TenbrinkHawaii Institute of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 461 West Lanikaula Street, Hilo, HI 96720

Search for other papers by Victoria L. Tenbrink in
ASHS
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Vapor heat treatments to disinfest tropical cut flowers and foliage were evaluated using a commercial facility. Efficacy was determined for specific durations against representative Hawaiian quarantine pests on their plant hosts. Nymphs and adults of aphids, soft and armored scales, mealybugs, and thrips were killed after 1 hour at 46.6C, and both life stages of aphids and armored scales along with mealybug nymphs after 2 hours at 45.2C. Injury to several varieties of Hawaiian floral commodities (Araceae, Musaceae, Zingiberaceae, Heliconiaceae, Orchidaceae, Marantaceae, Lycopodiaceae, Agavaceae, Proteaceae) during these treatments was determined. Large heliconias, most red ginger, bird-of-paradise flowers and leaves, and most foliage were not damaged; anthuriums, pincushion protea, and orchid flowers and foliage were very sensitive to vapor heat. Treatment modification was needed to reduce plant injury to these commodities without losing efficacy. The number of shelf-life days of the treated plant material was estimated from the visual ratings.

  • Collapse
  • Expand