VARIABILITY IN FOURTH DERIVATIVE LEAF SPECTROSCOPY OF FRAGARIA SPP. AND ITS RELATIONSHIP TO PHOTOSYNTHESIS

in HortScience
Authors:
Chuhe ChenWashington State University Research and Extension Unit, 1919 N.E. 78th St., Vancouver, WA 98665

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J. Scott CameronWashington State University Research and Extension Unit, 1919 N.E. 78th St., Vancouver, WA 98665

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Stephen F. KlauerWashington State University Research and Extension Unit, 1919 N.E. 78th St., Vancouver, WA 98665

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Accumulated attendance and fourth-derivative spectra were measured using intact leaf samples at mom temperature for 80 genotypes of four Fragaria species. Attendance peak wavelength and amplitude data of all samples was pooled and yielded 25 common bands for Fragaria. Of these, 14 chlorophyll bands and two phototransformed bands were consistent with French's (1972) model.

Peak wavelengths and amplitudes which represent major bands in F. chiloensis and F. × ananassa spectra were also determined separately. While peak wavelengths of the two species were identical, variation was noted in peak amplitude. The signals of the bands at Cb640, Cb649, Ca670, Ca673, Ca675-676, Ca684 and Ca693 in F. chiloensis were significantly stronger than those in F. × ananassa. Ca677 and Ca695 were stronger in F. × ananassa.

The greatest difference among Fragaria species was found in the amplitude of Ca693. The amplitude of this peak was greatest in F. chi/oensis (0.0025) and smallest in F. virginiana (-0.0005), The cultivated hybrid of these two species, F. × ananassa, was intermediate (0.0008), Preliminary evidence suggests that certain genotype-specific spectral characteristics may relate directly to observed differences in photosynthetic biology among these species.

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