PRUNING EFFECTS ON COLD HARDINESS OF TWO WOODY ORNAMENTAL PLANT TAXA

in HortScience
Authors:
C.L. HaynesDepartment of Horticulture, Univeristy of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Georgia Experiment Station, Griffin, GA 30223-1797

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O. M. LindstromDepartment of Horticulture, Univeristy of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Georgia Experiment Station, Griffin, GA 30223-1797

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M. A. DirrDepartment of Horticulture, Univeristy of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Georgia Experiment Station, Griffin, GA 30223-1797

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The effects of timing of pruning in relation to cold hardiness of X Cupressocyparis leylandii (A. B. Jacks. and Dallim.) Dallim. and A. B. Jacks. `Haggerston Grey' and Lagerstroemia L. `Natchez' were evaluated on 6 test dates from August 1989 to March 1990. Pruning treatments decreased the cold hardiness of both taxa compared to unpruned controls on 5 test dates. Cold tolerance of `Haggerston Grey' decreased for 4 to 5 months following the August and October pruning compared to the unpruned controls. `Haggerston Grey's cold tolerance were reduced by 6C in February. October and December pruning of `Natchez' reduced cold hardiness by 4C in January. However, cold hardiness of January and February pruning treatments was similar to unpruned controls. In general, the data indicated that plants of `Haggerston Grey' pruned in October through February were less cold hardy than plants pruned in August. Ideally, `Natchez' crape myrtle should be pruned in late winter.

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