Emergence, Growth, and Freezing Tolerance of Tomato Seedlings Grown from Uniconazole-treated Seed

in HortScience
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  • 1 Department of Agronomy and Horticulture, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602
  • | 2 Department of Horticulture, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523
  • | 3 Department of Agronomy and Horticulture, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602

Seeds of Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. UC 82L were treated with hypertonic priming solutions containing KNO3 and K3PO4(10 g·liter-1 each), and various concentrations of uniconazole before sowing. Treatment of the seed with priming solution only hastened emergence by ≈ 2 days compared to untreated seed sown directly from the packet, but did not affect total emergence after 12 days. Addition of uniconazole to the priming solution had no significant effect on speed of emergence or total emergence after 12 days compared to the primed control. Seed priming plus uniconazole at 1 or 10 mg·liter-1 reduced seedling height after 2 weeks by ≈ 20% compared to the primed control. Uniconazole had no effect on the mortality of either hardened or nonhardened seedlings exposed to below-freezing temperatures for 3 hr. These data suggest that treatment of tomato seed with hypertonic solutions containing uniconazole would be of little practical value in protecting seedlings from freeze damage. Chemical names used: (E)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-4,4-dimethyl-2-(1,2,4-triazol-yl)penten-3-ol (uniconazole).

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