Sensitivity of Seed Germination of Amaryllis to Light and Temperature

in HortScience
Authors:
William J. CarpenterOrnamental Horticulture Department, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611

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Eric R. OstmarkOrnamental Horticulture Department, IFAS, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611

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Abstract

Amaryllis, (Hippeastrum × hybridum Hort.) seed germination was light-independent, but temperature influenced the germination rate. Constant 25°C promoted higher total germination (86%), fewer days (8.3) to germinate, and a shorter span of days (4.3) than other constant temperatures or alternating temperatures of 25°–30°, 20°–30°, 15°–25°, 25°–35°, or 15°–35°. Exposures to 10° or 40° for 1 to 3 days during various seed germination phases reduced germination by 14% to 23% and delayed radicle emergence, but 40° for 1 to 3 days caused larger reductions in germination than comparable durations at 10°. Exposure of seeds to 10° or 40° between days 2 and 4 caused the largest reductions in total germination.

Contributor Notes

Professor of Ornamental Horticulture.

Laboratory Technician.

Received for publication 21 Mar. 1988. Florida Agricultural Experiment Station Journal Series no. 8831. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper therefore must be hereby marked advertisement solely to indicate this fact.

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