Plant Productivity in Controlled Environments

in HortScience
Authors:
Frank B. SalisburyPlant Science Department, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-4820

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Bruce BugbeePlant Science Department, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-4820

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Abstract

To assess the cost and area/volume requirements of a farm in a space station or Lunar or Martian base, a few laboratories in the United States, the Soviet Union, France, and Japan are studying optimum controlled environments for the production of selected crops. Temperature, light, photoperiod, CO2, humidity, the root–zone environment, and cultivars are the primary factors being manipulated to increase yields and harvest index. Our best wheat yields on a time basis (24 g·m–2·day–1 of edible biomass) are five times good field yields and twice the world record. Similar yields have been obtained in other laboratories with potatoes and lettuce; soybeans are also promising. These figures suggest that ≈30 m2 under continuous production could support an astronaut with sufficient protein and about 2800 kcal-day-1. Scientists under Iosif Gitelzon in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia, have lived in a closed system for up to 5 months, producing 80% of their own food. Thirty square meters for crops were allotted to each of the two men taking part in the experiment.

Contributor Notes

Work reported in this paper was supported by NASA–Ames Cooperative Agreement no. NCC 2-139 and by the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station. This is UAES paper no. 3556.

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