Ancymidol Rates and Application Timing Influence Asparagus Transplant Growth

in HortScience
Authors:
Paul R. AdlerDepartment of Horticultural Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108

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Robert J. DufaultDepartment of Horticultural Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108

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Luther Waters Jr.Department of Horticultural Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108

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Abstract

Single applications of ancymidol at 0.03, 0.12, 0.50, or 1.0 mg/plant were soil applied to asparagus seedlings (Asparagus officinalis L.) 3.5, 5.5, or 7.5 weeks after seeding. Increasing ancymidol rates from 0.03 to 1.0 mg/plant decreased bud number, fern dry weight, but not shoot number at all application times. When ancymidol was applied at 1.0 mg/plant at 3.5 weeks it reduced fleshy root production, but in plants treated at 5.5 to 7.5 weeks, it did not reduce fleshy root production. Increasing ancymidol rates from 0.03 to 1.0 mg/plant reduced the crown dry weight of plants 5.5 weeks and younger. Ancymidol from 0.03 to 1.0 mg/plant applied to 3.5-week-old plants increased the partitioning of dry matter into fern rather than crowns, but delaying application to 7.5 weeks after seeding reversed this relationship suggesting increased carbohydrate storage. Application of ancymidol from 0.03 to 1.0 mg/plant to plants 5.5-weeks-old or younger was considered detrimental to plant growth. Ancymidol at 0.50 mg/plant or less applied to 7.5-week-old plants enhanced the production of a stocky, compact transplant. Chemicals used. Ancymidol: α-cycloprophyl-α-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-pyrimidinemethanol.

Contributor Notes

Graduate Research Assistant. Present address: Dept. of Horticulture, Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Assistant Professor. Present address: Texas A&M Univ., Agr. Res. and Extension Center, 2415 East Highway 83, Weslaco, TX 78596.

Associate Professor.

Received for publication 21 May 1984. Journal article No. 13,962 of the Minnesota Agr. Expt. Sta. Financial assistance was provided by the Governor’s Council for Rural Development. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper therefore must be hereby marked advertisement solely to indicate this fact.

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