Effect of High Soil Moisture on Quality of Muskmelon1

in HortScience
Authors:
John A. WellsU.S. Department of Agriculture, Science and Education Administration, Agricultural Research, U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC 29407

Search for other papers by John A. Wells in
ASHS
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close
and
Perry E. NugentU.S. Department of Agriculture, Science and Education Administration, Agricultural Research, U.S. Vegetable Laboratory, Charleston, SC 29407

Search for other papers by Perry E. Nugent in
ASHS
Google Scholar
PubMed
Close

Abstract

‘Edisto’ and Saticoy Hybrid’ muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) were grown at 2 soil moisture levels. Soil moisture was negatively correlated with soluble solids content (SSC) in the fruit of both cultivars and negatively correlated with dry matter, ascorbic acid, β-carotene, and sucrose content in ‘Edisto’ and with ascorbic acid content in ‘Saticoy’. In both cultivars, SSC was highly correlated with ascorbic acid, sucrose, and dry matter content. The SSC, a commonly used measure of fruit quality, may be misleading unless the effect of soil moisture is considered.

Contributor Notes

Received for publication February 7, 1980.

The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper must therefore be hereby marked advertisement solely to indicate this fact.

Research Chemist and Research Horticulturist, respectively.

Mention of trade names is made for identification purposes only, and does not constitute an endorsement by the U.S. Department of Agriculture over any other suitable product.

  • Collapse
  • Expand