Waterlogging Tolerance of 57 Plant Species Grown Hydroponically

in HortScience

Plans for hydroponic experiments, as well as the flooding of watersheds for ecological restoration, require abundant evaluation information regarding plant species adapted to waterlogged environments. In this study, we observed the growth rate and phenotypes of 57 plant species, including nine provenances of four species grown hydroponically. The 57 species were from 22 families and 33 genera, and their waterlogging tolerance (WT) was classified into five categories according to the results of the evaluation: excellent, good, ordinary, poor, and very poor. We found that 60% of these plant species were able to survive in hydroculture for more than 10 weeks. They showed new shoot growth and had a survival rate of more than 60%. Species with excellent or good WT developed new leaves rapidly under waterlogging stress, whereas species with ordinary or poor WT exhibited old leaves dropping from the stem soon after waterlogging stress. In addition, phenotypic divergence occurred among provenances of the same species under waterlogging stress.

Contributor Notes

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (grant no. 31600307), the Forestry Science and Technology Innovation Project from the Forestry Department of Guangdong Province (grant no. 2017KJCX033), and the Science and Technology Planning Project of Guangdong Province (grant nos. 2015A020209139 and 2015B020207002).

We thank Xiaomei Deng, Hao Huang, Boyong Liao, and Xiangbin Zhou for germinating seeds; Juncheng Li for technical assistance; Xinsheng Hu for language improvement; and Rongjing Zhang and Huiming Lian for their valuable information about growth rate of tree seedlings under natural conditions.

Corresponding authors. E-mail: maling@scau.edu.cn or xychen@scau.edu.cn.

Article Sections

Article Figures

  • View in gallery

    Regeneration time of leaves. The old-leaves period indicates that all fully expanded leaves existed when the experiment started. The new-leaves period indicates that all leaves expanded fully after the experiment start date. The coexisting old- and new-leaves periods indicate that at least one old leaf and one new leaf coexisted. The no-leaf period indicates that no fully expanded leaves exist.

  • View in gallery

    Frequency distribution of phenotypes of surviving species. A, new shoots grew; B, leaves wilted and dropped from the stem; C, growth slowed or ceased; D, all leaves withered or dropped rapidly, with the terminal bud remaining alive; E, the entire plant withered rapidly.

  • View in gallery

    Quantized and weighted seedling growth rate (SGR) under natural conditions, survival rate after 10 weeks (SR2), phenotypes (phy), fresh biomass growth rate (FBGR), and waterlogging tolerance (WT) of 57 plant species in hydroculture [shown in two graphs (A and B) and in the same order as in Supplemental Table 1]. The letters on the right of the bars indicate the WT class of each species: E, excellent; G, good; O, ordinary; P, poor; VP, very poor.

Article References

  • AmadorM.L.SanchoS.BielsaB.Gomez-AparisiJ.Rubio-CabetasM.J.2012Physiological and biochemical parameters controlling waterlogging stress tolerance in Prunus before and after drainagePhysiol. Plant.144357368

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • Bailey-SerresJ.Cho LeeS.BrintonE.2012Waterproofing crops: Effective flooding survival strategiesPlant Physiol.16016981709

  • CarsjensC.NgocQ.N.GuzyJ.KnutzenF.MeierI.C.MullerM.FinkeldeyR.LeuschnerC.PolleA.2014Intra-specific variations in expression of stress-related genes in beech progenies are stronger than drought-induced responsesTree Physiol.3413481361

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • DuB.G.JansenK.KleiberA.EiblmeierM.KammererB.EnsmingerI.GesslerA.RennenbergH.KreuzwieserJ.2016A coastal and an interior Douglas fir provenance exhibit different metabolic strategies to deal with drought stressTree Physiol.36148163

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • GomathiR.Gururaja RaoP.N.ChandranK.SelviA.2015Adaptive responses of sugarcane to waterlogging stress: An overviewSugar Tech.17325338

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • GuoX.Y.HuangZ.Y.XuA.C.ZhangX.S.2011A comparison of physiological, morphological and growth responses of 13 hybrid poplar clones to floodingForestry84112

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • HerreraA.2013Responses to flooding of plant water relations and leaf gas exchange in tropical tolerant trees of a black-water wetlandFront. Plant Sci.4106

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • IrfanM.HayatS.HayatQ.AfrozS.AhmadA.2010Physiological and biochemical changes in plants under waterloggingProtoplasma241317

  • JaegerC.GesslerA.BillerS.RennenbergH.KreuzwieserJ.2009Differences in C metabolism of ash species and provenances as a consequence of root oxygen deprivation by waterloggingJ. Exp. Bot.6043354345

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • KimY.H.HwangS.J.WaqasM.KhanA.L.LeeJ.H.LeeJ.D.NguyenH.T.LeeI.J.2015Comparative analysis of endogenous hormones level in two soybean (Glycine max L.) lines differing in waterlogging toleranceFront. Plant Sci.6714

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • KreuzwieserJ.RennenbergH.2014Molecular and physiological responses of trees to waterlogging stressPlant Cell Environ.3722452259

  • LaanP.ClementJ.M.A.M.BlomC.W.P.M.1991Growth and development of Rumex roots as affected by hypoxic and anoxic conditionsPlant Soil1362749753

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • LiuS.Z.2004Modern practical soilless culture techniques. China Agriculture Press Beijing P.R. China

  • PagnussatG.C.LanteriM.L.LombardoM.C.LamattinaL.2004Nitric oxide mediates the indole acetic acid induction activation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade involved in adventitious root developmentPlant Physiol.135279286

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • VisserE.J.W.VoesenekL.A.C.J.VartapetianB.B.JacksonM.B.2003Flooding and plant growthAnn. Bot.91107109

  • YeY.TamN.F.Y.WongY.S.LuC.Y.2003Growth and physiological responses of two mangrove species (Bruguiera gymnorrhiza and Kandelia candel) to waterloggingEnviron. Exp. Bot.49209221

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • YildizD.NzokouP.DeligozA.KocI.GencM.2014Chemical and physiological responses of four Turkish red pine (Pinus brutia Ten.) provenances to cold temperature treatmentsEur. J. For. Res.133809818

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Article Information

Google Scholar

Related Content

Article Metrics

All Time Past Year Past 30 Days
Abstract Views 57 57 57
Full Text Views 14 14 14
PDF Downloads 11 11 11