‘Keepsake’ Strawberry

in HortScience

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Contributor Notes

Current address: Department of Genetics, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Agrónomos, Edificio Gregor Mendel (C-5), Campus de Rabanales, University of Cordoba, 14071 Córdoba, Spain

Corrresponding author. E-mail: Kim.Lewers@USDA.gov.

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    Pedigree of ‘Keepsake’ strawberry, developed at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, MD. Seed parents are represented above pollen parents.

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    ‘Keepsake’ strawberry fruits, produced in plasticulture at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Beltsville Agricultural Research Center, Beltsville, MD.

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    ‘Keepsake’ strawberry fruit storage quality compared with other cultivars grown in plasticulture at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Beltsville Research Center, Beltsville, MD, from 2016 through 2018. From field harvests of fruits showing no signs of decay, up to 12 fruits were selected for shelf-life evaluation and placed in a labeled clear plastic egg carton, calyx down. These fruits were further selected to be free of signs of injury and relatively uniform in size, shape, and maturity. Fruits in the egg cartons were stacked in plastic egg boxes stacked two boxes high and covered in a black plastic trash bag. The fruits were stored in a walk-in cooler set at 0 °C. At 1 week and 2 weeks, the number of fruits in each egg carton that showed signs of decay or degradation was recorded. A single fruit could be both decayed and degraded. The yearly estimates for decayed or degraded fruits at 1 week and 2 weeks were used in an analysis of variance for genotypic comparison across years. Portion degraded at 1 week provided greater separation of means that at 2 weeks. Portion decayed at 2 weeks showed greater separation of means than at 1 week. Numbers in parentheses after cultivar names indicate the number of years evaluated for this analysis.

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    ‘Keepsake’ strawberry fruit size compared with other cultivars grown in plasticulture at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Beltsville Research Center, Beltsville, MD, from 2010 through 2018. Ten randomly selected nondecayed fruits were weighed to obtain an average fruit weight for each plot and harvest. The average of all plot × harvest averages for a cultivar was reported as that cultivar’s “average fruit size” for the year. The largest of those plot × harvest averages was reported as that cultivar’s “large fruit size” for the year. Each year’s average for average fruit size (grams/fruit), and largest average fruit size (grams/fruit) for each cultivar was used in an analysis of variance. Numbers in parentheses after cultivar names indicate the number of years evaluated.

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    ‘Keepsake’ strawberry total annual yield and non-decayed yield compared with other cultivars grown in plasticulture at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Beltsville Research Center, Beltsville, MD, from 2010 through 2018. For each plot at each harvest, decayed fruits were harvested into separate containers from fruits that showed no sign of decay. The containers were weighed separately. Yields were adjusted for plant stands. Each year, analyses of variance (ANOVAs) were performed for total yield and nondecayed yield for comparison within year. The yearly estimates for total yield and nondecayed yield were used in a second analysis of variance for genotypic comparison across multiple years. Numbers in parentheses after cultivar names indicate the number of years evaluated.

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    ‘Keepsake’ fruiting season compared with other cultivars grown at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Beltsville Research Center, Beltsville, MD, in 2011, a year representative of the season relationships between these cultivars. Plots were harvested twice weekly, and the harvests combined for each week. Yields were adjusted for plant stands and reported as grams/plant each week. Earliglow is a standard early-season cultivar, Keepsake, Camarosa, Chandler, and Flavorfest fruited midseason; Allstar is a standard mid-to-late-season cultivar; and Ovation is a standard late-season cultivar.

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