‘Alisio 15®’: An Early-maturing Peach Cultivar for the Fresh Fruit Market

in HortScience

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‘Alisio 15®’, a new peach [Prunus persica (L.) Bastch] for the fresh market, resulted from a cross made in Murcia (Spain) as part of the IMIDA-NOVAMED breeding program with the aim of breeding new early-ripening cultivars with dark red skin, good size, and high sugar content as an improvement over other early cultivars currently available. This cultivar combines very early-season ripening, extensive red-blushed skin, and very good eating quality of the fruit. Few peaches in the Mediterranean area are marketable in the very early season (mid-April to early May) and the European-wide demand for early-maturing peaches exceeds supply. In this respect, the new cultivar, Alisio 15®, has the potential to contribute to the supply of fresh fruit and provide an improvement in the quality of early fruit.

Origin

‘Alisio 15®’ originated from an open pollination of the selection S2099, which was obtained from a cross between ‘Candor’ and the low-chill requirement cultivar Flordaprince released by the University of Florida (Okie, 1998; Sherman et al., 1982) (Fig. 1). The open-pollinated seeds were collected in 2005 at the Torreblanca Field Station, Torre Pacheco, Murcia, Spain, and the seeds were germinated through in vitro embryo rescue and grown in the greenhouse until planting in Mar. 2006. Seedlings fruited for the first time in May 2007.

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.

Pedigree of ‘Alisio 15®’ peach.

Citation: HortScience horts 50, 2; 10.21273/HORTSCI.50.2.312

‘Alisio 15®’ was preselected in a high-density planting of seedlings in the Torreblanca Field Station, Torre Pacheco, Murcia, Spain (lat. +37°46' N, long. 0°53' W). The location where the seedlings were grown is an altitude of 36 m above sea level (m.a.s.l.) with an average chill accumulation of 400 to 600 h below 7 °C, mostly as a result of the prevailing maritime climate. The selection was grafted on ‘Garnem®’ (Garfi × Nemaguard, P. amygdalus × P. persica) rootstock and planted at the same location. The tree and fruit were evaluated in 2010, 2011, and 2012. Trees also propagated on ‘Garnem®’ were planted in Hoya del Campo, Abarán, Murcia, Spain [lat. +38°14' N, long. 1°20' W], 200 m.a.s.l., and with a chill accumulation of 570 h below 7 °C.

Description

The low-chill requirements of this cultivar are indicated by its adaptation to the climatic conditions of southeast Spain. The tree is semiupright and vigorous with no blind nodes. The flower density is high (48 flowers/m), with two flowers per node at least, and blooming is uniform (Frett et al., 2013; Reig et al., 2013). The flowers are medium–large size, pink, showy, and pollen-fertile. The leaves are lanceolate in shape with crenulated margins and globose leaf glands. Leaves are dark green and medium-sized (163 mm long, 47 mm wide, and the petiole 11 mm) based on a random sample of 30 shoots and leaves taken from the midpoint of each shoot (Fig. 2).

Fig. 2.
Fig. 2.

Fruits, leaves, and flowers of ‘Alisio 15®’ peach.

Citation: HortScience horts 50, 2; 10.21273/HORTSCI.50.2.312

The major advantages of ‘Alisio 15®’ relative to current cultivars are its earliness and attractiveness. The fruit is oblate with a recessed tip and of medium weight (110 to 120 g) (Table 1). The suture is not very pronounced, and the fruit skin has a fine, short, and netted pubescence. The entire fruit surface is an attractive mottled dark red (Fig. 2), even in non-sun-exposed fruits of the tree, and with some spots. The fruit flesh is an attractive bright yellow, melting, clingstone, and with good fresh eating quality. At the commercial maturity stage, the fruits are sweet (10.6 °Brix on average) with medium acidity (10.2 g of malic acid/L) (Table 1). The fruit development period for this selection averages 88 ± 5 d. ‘Alisio 15®’ ripens 1 week before ‘Zaibulo®’ and ‘Plagold 5®’, the earliest peach varieties grown in the Mediterranean production area (Fig. 3). Under the climatic conditions in Murcia (Spain), the ripening date is the first week of May, when there is very limited competition from peaches produced in other European countries.

Table 1.

Bloom and ripening date, and main qualitative traits of ‘Alisio 15®’ fruit at Torreblanca and Hoya del Campo (Murcia, Spain).

Table 1.
Fig. 3.
Fig. 3.

Bloom and harvest period of ‘Alisio 15®’ relative to other peach cultivars in La Hoya del Campo (Abarán, Murcia, Spain) during 2012.

Citation: HortScience horts 50, 2; 10.21273/HORTSCI.50.2.312

Molecular Characterization

Molecular characterization of ‘Alisio 15®’ and the selection parent S2099 was performed using microsatellites [simple sequence repeat (SSR)] following Maghuly et al. (2005). Genomic DNA was isolated from young fresh leaves using the DNeasy Plant Mini Kit (Qiagen). The following 16 primer pairs flanking microsatellites, previously developed in Prunus, were assayed (Table 2): BPPCT001, BPPCT007, BPPCT008, BPPCT015, BPPCT017, BPPCT025, BPPCT038, CPPCT006, CPPCT017, CPPCT022, CPPCT044, UDP96-005, UDP98-022, UDP98-409, UDP98-410, and UDP98-412. Fluorescently labeled microsatellite fragments were analyzed on an ABI 3730 capillary sequencer (Genómica-Campus Moncloa del Parque Científico de Madrid, www.fpcm.es). Fragment sizing was performed using the GeneMapper analysis software (Applied Biosystems, Carlsbad, CA). The SSR fingerprinting provides a tool to uniquely indentify this cultivar with a very low probability of confusion with other cultivars.

Table 2.

Molecular characterization of the peach genotypes ‘Alisio 15®’ and its parent S2099 using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers.

Table 2.

Availability

This cultivar obtained by the IMIDA-NOVAMED peach breeding program was developed for the market by NOVAMED S.L. (Murcia, Spain). For bud wood availability, please contact NOVAMED PEACH SL.

Literature Cited

  • AranzanaM.J.García-MasJ.CarbóJ.ArúsP.2002Development and variability analysis of microsatellite markers in peachPlant Breed.1218792

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • CiprianiG.LotG.HuangH.G.MarrazzoM.T.PeterlungerE.TestolinR.1999AC/GT and AG/CT microsatellite repeats in peach [Prunus persica (L) Batsch]: Isolation, characterization and cross-species amplification in PrunusTheor. Appl. Genet.996572

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • DirlewangerE.CrossonA.TavaudP.AranzanaM.J.PoizatC.ZanettoA.ArúsP.LaigretL.2002Development of microsatellite markers in peach and their use in genetic diversity analysis in peach and sweet cherryTheor. Appl. Genet.105127138

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • DirlewangerE.GrazianoE.JoobeurT.Garriga-CalderéF.CossonP.HowadW.ArúsP.2004Comparative mapping and marker-assisted selection in Rosaceae fruit cropsProc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA10198919896

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • FrettT.J.GasicK.ClarkJ.R.ByrneD.GradzielT.CrisostoC.2013Standardized phenotyping for fruit quality in peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch]Journal of the American Pomological Society.66214219

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • MaghulyF.Borroto FernandezE.RuthnerS.PedrycA.LaimerM.2005Microsatellite variability in apricots (Prunus armeniaca L.) reflects their geographic origin and breeding historyTree Genet. Genomes1151165

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • OkieW.R.1998Handbook of peach and nectarine varieties. Performance in the southeastern United States and index of names. Agriculture Handbook no. 714. U.S. Department of Agriculture–Southeastern Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory Byron GA

  • ReigG.AlegreS.GatiusF.IglesiasI.2013Agronomical performance under Mediterranean climatic conditions among peach [Prunus persica L. (Batsch)] cultivars originated from different breeding programmesSci. Hort.150267277

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • ShermanW.B.LyreneP.M.MortensenJ.A.SharpeR.H.1982‘Flordaprince’ peachHortScience17988

  • TestolinR.MarrazzoT.CiprianiG.QuartaR.VerdeI.DettoriM.T.PancaldiM.SansaviniS.2000Microsatellite DNA in peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) and its use in fingerprinting and testing the genetic origin of cultivarsGenome43512520

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

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Contributor Notes

We thank to Julio del Olmo, Marcos López, Belén López, and Pablo Cosmen for technical assistance in developing the cultivar.

To whom reprint requests should be addressed; e-mail antonio.carrillo4@carm.es.

Article Sections

Article Figures

  • View in gallery

    Pedigree of ‘Alisio 15®’ peach.

  • View in gallery

    Fruits, leaves, and flowers of ‘Alisio 15®’ peach.

  • View in gallery

    Bloom and harvest period of ‘Alisio 15®’ relative to other peach cultivars in La Hoya del Campo (Abarán, Murcia, Spain) during 2012.

Article References

  • AranzanaM.J.García-MasJ.CarbóJ.ArúsP.2002Development and variability analysis of microsatellite markers in peachPlant Breed.1218792

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • CiprianiG.LotG.HuangH.G.MarrazzoM.T.PeterlungerE.TestolinR.1999AC/GT and AG/CT microsatellite repeats in peach [Prunus persica (L) Batsch]: Isolation, characterization and cross-species amplification in PrunusTheor. Appl. Genet.996572

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • DirlewangerE.CrossonA.TavaudP.AranzanaM.J.PoizatC.ZanettoA.ArúsP.LaigretL.2002Development of microsatellite markers in peach and their use in genetic diversity analysis in peach and sweet cherryTheor. Appl. Genet.105127138

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • DirlewangerE.GrazianoE.JoobeurT.Garriga-CalderéF.CossonP.HowadW.ArúsP.2004Comparative mapping and marker-assisted selection in Rosaceae fruit cropsProc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA10198919896

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • FrettT.J.GasicK.ClarkJ.R.ByrneD.GradzielT.CrisostoC.2013Standardized phenotyping for fruit quality in peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch]Journal of the American Pomological Society.66214219

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • MaghulyF.Borroto FernandezE.RuthnerS.PedrycA.LaimerM.2005Microsatellite variability in apricots (Prunus armeniaca L.) reflects their geographic origin and breeding historyTree Genet. Genomes1151165

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • OkieW.R.1998Handbook of peach and nectarine varieties. Performance in the southeastern United States and index of names. Agriculture Handbook no. 714. U.S. Department of Agriculture–Southeastern Fruit and Tree Nut Research Laboratory Byron GA

  • ReigG.AlegreS.GatiusF.IglesiasI.2013Agronomical performance under Mediterranean climatic conditions among peach [Prunus persica L. (Batsch)] cultivars originated from different breeding programmesSci. Hort.150267277

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • ShermanW.B.LyreneP.M.MortensenJ.A.SharpeR.H.1982‘Flordaprince’ peachHortScience17988

  • TestolinR.MarrazzoT.CiprianiG.QuartaR.VerdeI.DettoriM.T.PancaldiM.SansaviniS.2000Microsatellite DNA in peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) and its use in fingerprinting and testing the genetic origin of cultivarsGenome43512520

    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

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