Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 42,358 items

In Honduras, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is an economically important crop for farmers because of its high domestic consumption, year-round production, and high export potential. However, tomato production faces challenges such as diseases and pests and is confounded by climate change, all of which reduce productivity and quality. Evaluating the adaptation of tomato cultivars is critical to ensuring the long-term sustainability and resilience of the horticulture sector in the region. The objective of this study was to identify tomato lines with adaptability, high yield, pest, and disease resistance under greenhouse and open field production conditions for the Honduran market. Ten tomato lines and two commercial hybrids were evaluated between Feb and Jul 2022 in San Antonio de Oriente, Francisco Morazán, Honduras. Desirable traits related to vegetative growth, productivity, fruit quality, and resistance to insect pests and diseases were measured. Seven lines were highly adapted and had high vegetative growth. The tomato lines were not significantly different in terms of tomato yellow leaf curl disease and late blight disease index; however, the fruit borer susceptibility varied, with AVTO1908 being the most susceptible. The highest performing line was AVTO1903, which had the greatest total marketable yield in both the open field (101.3 t⋅ha−1) and greenhouse (62.1 t⋅ha−1). Additionally, AVTO1903 and AVTO1915 had good quality traits (roundness index, total soluble solids, and dry matter), thus demonstrating their potential for sustainable and high-yielding cultivation in Honduras. The growth and productivity of the tomato lines were highly influenced by the environment. This work highlights the advantages of introducing exotic cultivars to combat the effects of climate change and ensure sustained production; however, further research is needed to ensure that local farmer and consumer demands are met.

Open Access

‘Coy’ alder-leaf mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus montanus) is a new cultivar developed from a species native to the western United States with potential for use in xeriscaping, rock gardens, and water-efficient landscaping. However, efficient propagation methods are not well developed for it. In this study, cutting propagation of ‘Coy’ alder-leaf mountain mahogany was investigated over 3 years to evaluate the effects of wounding method, rooting hormone, type of cuttings collected, and time for cutting collection on rooting. In May, Jul, and Sep 2020, 2021, and 2022, nondormant hardwood subterminal cuttings and/or semihardwood terminal cuttings were collected for wounding studies. Before the treatment with 3000 mg·L−1 indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) in powder, cuttings were wounded either by scraping one side (scrape) or by perpendicular cuts around the base (cut), and cuttings without additional wounding were used as the control. Similarly, subterminal and terminal cuttings of ‘Coy’ alder-leaf mountain mahogany were collected during the same time and were used for hormone treatments. Cuttings were treated with 1000 or 3000 mg·L−1 IBA in powder or 1000/500 or 3000/1500 mg·L−1 IBA/NAA (1-naphthaleneacetic acid) in solution. Wounding by cut or scrape increased the rooting percentage. In addition, most cuttings wounded by the scrape method had better rooting than those wounded with cuts. On the basis of hierarchical cluster analyses, cuttings treated with 3000 mg·L−1 IBA in powder had greater rooting than those treated with other hormones. Therefore, our research showed that successful rooting of subterminal or terminal stem cuttings of ‘Coy’ alder-leaf mountain mahogany can be achieved through wounding using scrape method and by treatment with 3000 mg·L−1 IBA in powder.

Open Access

Selenium is an essential mineral for both humans and animals. Around 0.5–1 billion individuals globally suffer from selenium deficiency, which can result in a range of illnesses. Hence, the cultivation of selenium-enriched agricultural items can serve as a potent strategy to mitigate selenium deficiency. This study aimed to examine the effect of selenium on the quality, and phytochemical and mineral content of red currant (Red Lake) and jostaberry. The study was conducted in 2022 and 2023. Different doses of selenium (0, 4, and 8 mg⋅kg−1) were sprayed on the fruits three times with 10-days intervals starting from the first formation of the fruits after flowering. Upon completion of the study, various factors were assessed including cluster and berry properties, water-soluble dry matter content, pH levels, titratable acid content, ascorbic acid levels, antioxidant activity, and total phenolics content. The mineral composition of the fruit peel, pulp, and seed was also measured. In jostaberry, the highest values of cluster weight, cluster height, and 100-berry weight were obtained with 8 mg⋅kg−1 selenium application. As the selenium dosage increased, the levels of ascorbic acid, antioxidant activity, and total phenolic content increased, with the highest values determined to be 0.063 mg⋅mL−1, 63.23% DPPH, and 3752.22 mg⋅g−1, respectively, at 8 mg⋅kg−1. In the Red Lake variety, it has been determined that the 4 mg⋅kg−1 dose is effective in terms of cluster weight, cluster width, and cluster height attributes. The highest values for ascorbic acid, antioxidant activity, and total phenolic content were determined to be 0.029 mg⋅mL−1, 53.42% DPPH, and 3117.17 mg⋅g−1, respectively, at the 4 mg⋅kg−1 dose. The selenium content was found to be highest in the peel and pulp of jostaberry at 8 mg⋅kg−1, and in Red Lake, it was obtained at the 4 mg⋅kg−1 application. As a result, an 8 mg⋅kg−1 dose of selenium could be recommended for jostaberry, and a 4 mg⋅kg−1 dose could be recommended for Red Lake.

Open Access
Authors: and

Drought and salinity affect turfgrass growth and development adversely. Plant growth-promoting microorganisms (PGPMs) have been shown to have the capability of improving resistance to biotic stressors in plants. The objective of this research was to determine the efficacy of six commercial PGPMs on enhancing the drought and salinity resistance of kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis). The six PGPMs evaluated were Beauveria bassiana (strain GHA), Bacillus subtilis (strain GB03), Azadirachtin, Bacillus firmus (strain 1-582), Trichoderma harzianum Rifai (strain T-22) combined with Trichoderma virens (strain G-41), and Bacillus subtilis (strain QST713). Three cultivars—Kenblue, Moonlight, and Waterworks—were seeded in the greenhouse. Two-week seedlings were exposed to saline (sodium chloride at 6 dS⋅m–1 three times per week) or drought (tap water once per week) conditions, and no stress (irrigated with tap water three times per week) for 4 weeks. Results show that drought and salinity inhibited turf growth, with the greatest reduction in root dry weight (50.3% in drought conditions and 31.4% in saline conditions). ‘Kenblue’ performed better than ‘Waterworks’ and ‘Moonlight’ in all growth indices except for root length. Beauveria bassiana and B. subtilis had a similar or better result in enhancing turfgrass growth and development compared with the untreated turf under stress. Our results suggest that certain PGPMs have the potential to improve abiotic stress resistance in turfgrass.

Open Access

Thirty sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas var. batatas) genotypes were evaluated for yield, resistances to weevil or nematode pests, and consumer acceptance across three field trials planted at Pepe‘ekeo, Hawai‘i Island between 2017 to 2020. At harvest, storage roots were graded according to market standards, followed by scoring for damage by sweetpotato weevil (Cylas formicarius elegantulus), rough sweetpotato weevil (Blosyrus asellus), or nematodes; namely root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) or reniform nematode (Rotylenchus reniformis) in each market class. There were significant differences in marketable yields among accessions when data were analyzed statistically across all three field trials, as well as individually. ‘Regal’ (PI 566650) and ‘Sumor’ (PI 566657) were among the top three highest-yielding genotypes for Trials 1 and 2 (when no insecticides were applied to control weevils), and among the top six highest-yielding genotypes for the joint analysis across three trials. Significant differences among genotypes for combined sweetpotato weevil damage (incidence of sweetpotato weevil alone or incidence of both weevils together) were found in the joint analysis across three trials. ‘Regal’ was among the lowest seven genotypes for combined sweetpotato weevil damage, supporting earlier reports of its moderate resistance to this pest. In addition, two genotypes produced by the World Vegetable Center (Shanhua, Taiwan) (WT-320 and WT-108), were among the lowest genotypes for combined sweetpotato weevil damage, in agreement with earlier reports of their substantial resistance to this pest. Providing access to diverse germplasm will help farmers react to increasing pest pressure, while still allowing for high marketable yields. In addition, breeding and selection for pest resistance could be an important addition to integrated pest management of sweetpotato in Hawai‘i.

Open Access

Health and quality of the root system are imperative to ensure the successful establishment of a citrus tree after transplant from the nursery into the field. Containerized citrus production in enclosed nurseries restricts root growth and can result in root circling and intertwining. This may hinder root expansion and result in root girdling after transplant, negatively affecting tree establishment and growth. The root structure of a transplanted citrus tree can also be affected by the container type used in the nursery. Containers with root-pruning properties like chemical pruning or air pruning reduce root circling and may produce superior root systems compared with regular, nonpruning containers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different nursery containers on root physiological and morphological traits and plant performance over 15 months of growth in the nursery. Three container types, chemical pruning containers, air-pruning containers, and standard nursery containers, were compared. The chemical pruning containers were standard citrus nursery containers with a mixture of copy hydroxide [Cu(OH)2] and copper carbonate (CuCO3) [10% copper (Cu)] applied to the inner wall. Pruning occurs upon contact of the roots with the Cu on the wall of the containers. The air-pruning containers were custom-sized Air-Pots in which pruning occurs on holes in the wall of the containers upon contact of the roots with the air. Two rootstocks, US-812 and US-942 (Citrus reticulata × Poncirus trifoliata), were included for comparison in the nongrafted stage and 12 months after grafting with ‘Valencia’ orange (Citrus sinensis). Chemical root pruning positively influenced tree height, shoot mass, leaf area, rootstock trunk diameter, and the nonfibrous root biomass. No differences among container types were observed for the fibrous root biomass, but chemical pruning produced more roots that were finer with a higher specific root length and a higher respiration rate. In contrast, air pruning produced more roots that were thicker compared with the other containers. Most of the leaf nutrients were lower in trees grown in the chemical pruning containers compared with the standard containers, except for Cu and zinc (Zn), which were highest in the former. Trees growing in air-pruning containers were not significantly different in growth from trees growing in standard containers.

Open Access

The nursery industry produces and sells plants for landscape and environmental purposes and represents a major sector within the US agricultural industry. In recent years, the nursery industry has undergone rapid growth as a result of various factors, including increased demand from housing development and pandemic-fueled interest in home horticulture. As with any industry, the nursery industry must adapt to changes in societal trends to sustain growth. In the wake of unprecedented societal and supply chain issues stemming from the global coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, the American Society for Horticultural Science Nursery Crops Professional Interest Group gathered experts in various disciplines to provide their opinions and insights into the future of the nursery industry, focusing specifically on the changes and challenges the nursery industry will face in the coming decade. Nursery crop specialists spanning the United States identified three primary areas that will steer the future momentum of the nursery industry: consumer trends, natural resources, and labor. Six experts were selected to represent these areas in a workshop held Jul 2022 at the American Society for Horticultural Science Annual Conference in Chicago, IL, USA. This article was developed to disseminate to the greater scientific community the discussions held and insight shared during that workshop.

Open Access