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Open access

Christian T. Christensen, Lincoln Zotarelli, Kathleen G. Haynes and Charles Ethan Kelly

Solanum chacoense is a wild relative of potato (Solanum tuberosum) that is of interest because of its many desirable traits, but it exhibits variations in tuber dormancy across accessions. The objective of this study was to determine an appropriate gibberellic acid (GA3) concentration and soak time treatment to encourage sprout development across four accessions of S. chacoense (A, B, C, and D) from the 174 accessions of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Potato Genebank. Twelve treatments were created by using four concentrations of GA3 (0, 50, 100, and 150 μg·mL−1) across three soak periods (5, 45, and 90 minutes). Small (average weight, 1.4 g), medium (2.6 g), and large (5.6 g) tubers were distributed among all treatments. Percentage of tubers sprouted, time to sprouting, sprout length, and sprout number per tuber were analyzed to determine the effectiveness of GA3 treatments on dormancy breaking. GA3 concentrations of 50, 100, and 150 μg·mL−1 partially broke dormancy within accessions B and C. None of the tested treatments were effective for breaking dormancy in accession D within 46 days after treatment. Accession A showed weaker dormancy, thus producing a similar percentage of sprouted tubers across all GA3 treatments. Soak time had no significant effect on all parameters measured. Larger tubers produced greater sprout number per tuber and percentages of sprouted tubers. Soaking tubers in 50 μg·mL−1 of GA3 may be an effective treatment for S. chacoense accessions with mild dormancy, but alternative methods to break dormancy may be required for S. chacoense accessions with stronger dormancy.

Open access

Ronald C. Stephenson, Christine E.H. Coker, Benedict C. Posadas, Gary R. Bachman, Richard L. Harkess, John J. Adamczyk and Patricia R. Knight

Due to difficulty in monitoring insect pests, applications of insecticides are frequently conducted on a calendar schedule. However, seasonal variability in pest populations leads to these calendar schedules sometimes being inaccurate. Threshold-based insect management strategies, including use of thresholds with conventional pesticides and with use of organic pesticides only, were compared with a conventional calendar approach for yield, management cost, and production value of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Effect of cultivar was considered by inclusion of the long season cultivar Celebrity and the short season cultivar Early Girl Bush. These factors were compared for spring and fall seasons during two production years. Greatest total and marketable yields were obtained from use of conventional pesticides according to action thresholds. Use of organic insecticides according to thresholds did not affect yields in comparison with a calendar-based approach. Proportion of fruit rated unmarketable was greater with use of organic insecticides due to reduced efficacy and residual of control. Production costs for the organic threshold-based approach were greater due to increased number of insecticide applications required. Gross margin for both conventional and organic threshold-based insect pest management was greater than for the conventional calendar method. Increased economic return for conventional threshold-based management was due to increased yields. Increase in return for organic threshold management was based on premiums received for organically grown tomatoes. Adoption of conventional threshold-based insect pest management by small-scale producers has the potential to increase production efficiency and value, as well as increase environmental sustainability of production. Economic feasibility of organic production requires access to markets willing to pay significant premiums for organic produce. Further research to evaluate economic and yield impacts of production practices for small-scale farms is needed.

Restricted access

Camila P. Croge, Francine L. Cuquel, Paula T.M. Pintro, Luiz A. Biasi and Claudine M. De Bona

Antioxidants are compounds with varied chemical structures that are affected by biotic and abiotic factors. The objective of this study was to characterize and compare bioactive compounds and the antioxidant capacity of fruit from four blackberry cultivars produced under different climatic conditions. Ascorbic acid content, total polyphenols, flavonoids, monomeric anthocyanins and antioxidant activity of the fruit were evaluated, and high levels of bioactive compounds as well as antioxidant activity were observed regardless of the cultivar or growing location. The results showed that bioactive production is affected by the cultivar and environment. Furthermore, the antioxidant potential of the blackberry fruit depends on the total phenolics and anthocyanin.

Open access

Yuan Li, Arend-Jan Both, Christian A. Wyenandt, Edward F. Durner and Joseph R. Heckman

Although not considered an essential nutrient, silicon (Si) can be beneficial to plants. Si accumulator species such as pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo var. pepo) can absorb Si from soil. Si uptake may reduce plant susceptibility to fungal diseases such as cucurbit powdery mildew (Podosphaera xanthii and Erysiphe cichoracearum). We previously reported that wollastonite, an Organic Materials Reviews Institute–approved natural mineral, can increase soil Si level, increase soil pH, provide pumpkin plants with Si, and increase their resistance to powdery mildew. In this study, we examined the optimum application rate of wollastonite for pumpkins grown in pots and exposed to cucurbit powdery mildew. We confirmed that wollastonite has liming capabilities similar to regular limestone. Regardless of the application rates, wollastonite and limestone showed similar effects on soil chemistry and plant mineral composition. Pumpkin plants grown with the lower doses of wollastonite amendments (3.13 and 6.25 tons/acre) had the greatest tissue Si concentrations and demonstrated the greatest disease resistance. We conclude that wollastonite is a useful material for organic cucurbit (Cucurbitaceae) growers who want to increase soil pH and improve plant resistance to powdery mildew at the same time. Applying wollastonite at rates beyond the amount required to achieve a desirable soil pH for pumpkin production did not further increase Si uptake, nor did it further suppress powdery mildew development.

Open access

Tripti Vashisth and Taylor Livingston

Previous research has shown that Huanglongbing {HLB [causal agent Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas)]}-affected sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) trees have a reduced root-to-shoot ratio, potentially due to the high rate of root death. The diminished root system cannot support the existing aboveground canopy and a cycle of imbalance begins. As a result, the tree enters into a continuous carbohydrate stress cycle and, eventually, the tree declines. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate pruning as a strategy to adjust the root-to-shoot ratio to improve growth and productivity of HLB-affected trees. In Jan. 2015, a 3-year trial was initiated on a 14-year-old grove of ‘Hamlin’ sweet orange on Swingle citrumelo (Citrus paradisi × Poncirus trifoliate) rootstock that was symptomatic of HLB and produced less than 180 lb of fruit per tree. The four pruning treatments were as follows: 1) 0% pruning (no canopy removal), 2) 25% pruning (canopy removed), 3) 50% pruning (canopy removed), and 4) 80% pruning (canopy removed). In a split-plot design, two sources of fertilizer were evaluated in combination with the pruning: 1) conventional fertilizer [CNV (dry granular)] applied at 200 lb/acre nitrogen (N) in five split applications per year, and 2) controlled-release fertilizer (CRF) applied at 150 lb/acre N, split in three applications per year. Within each pruning treatment, half of the trees received CNV and the other half received CRF. The fertilizer treatments were applied in each of the 3 years; however, pruning was performed only once in the beginning of the experiment. The trees that were pruned produced new vegetative growth that looked healthy with no visual HLB symptoms (initially); however, the trees remained positive for CLas throughout the study as determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The 80% pruned trees grew vigorously over the course of 3 years but remained significantly smaller in canopy than control trees (0% pruning) for both CRF and CNV treatments. The 25% and 50% pruned tree canopies grew back and were similar in canopy size as 0% pruning (control) treatment by the end of year 2. At the end of the study, the use of CRF on 25% pruned trees resulted in a significantly higher leaf area index as compared with trees receiving CNV. A significant positive linear correlation was observed between canopy volume and root density; the root density decreased with intensive pruning. A significant positive correlation was also observed between canopy volume and yield, and a negative correlation between canopy volume and fruit drop. There were no significant increases in yield resulting from any pruning or fertilization treatments compared with controls (0% pruning). However, with the use of CRF, the amount of N and frequency of application were reduced. Overall, our results indicate that pruning did not improve the productivity of HLB-affected trees over the course of 3 years. Therefore, severe pruning is not a viable option to rejuvenate the HLB-affected trees.

Open access

Isaac T. Mertz, Nick E. Christians and Adam W. Thoms

Amino acids have been reported to improve turfgrass growth compared with mineral nutrition; however, amino acid catabolism in plants has not been well studied. A number of turfgrass fertilizers contain amino acids; however, some amino acids may be more effective additives in fertilizers than others. Three amino acids that could be effective nitrogen sources for plant growth are the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs). The BCAA leucine (L), isoleucine (IL), and valine (V) could be effective additives because they are nonpolar and hydrophobic, which can promote plant uptake of these compounds. Although the effect of exogenously applied BCAA on plant growth is not well known, BCAAs have been reported to increase protein synthesis in humans, and that rate of increase is related to the intake ratio of L to IL and V. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of L, IL, and V as a nitrogen sources on creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera) and to investigate the effect of BCAAs on plant growth when all three are applied as a combination. Using specially made rooting tubes, L, IL, and V were applied in a complete factorial and compared with equal urea nitrogen at four rates, as well as an untreated control. Where all three BCAAs were applied in combination, the application ratios of 2:1:1 and 4:1:1 (L:IL:V) were tested. At 63 days after seeding, there were no differences in root length, root weight, or shoot weight; however, BCAA 2:1:1 and 4:1:1 increased creeping bentgrass shoot density by 24% and 32%, respectively, compared with equal urea nitrogen. Where shoot density was increased, nitrogen application rate had no effect. On the basis of these results, BCAAs applied in a complete combination using ratios of 2:1:1 or 4:1:1 (3.03 lb/acre N) will provide a greater creeping bentgrass shoot density compared with equal urea nitrogen.

Restricted access

Mingyuan Xu, Yingwei Wang, Qianbo Wang, Shenglei Guo, Yang Liu, Jia Liu, Zhonghua Tang and Zhenyue Wang

In this investigation, changes in growth and photosynthetic parameters were used to explain the effects of drought stress on morphology and photosynthesis of Eleutherococcus senticosus. Liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectroscopy (MS) was used to determine the content of eleutheroside B, eleutheroside E, isofraxidin, hyperoside, rutin, and kaempferol under different drought stress conditions to explain the effects of drought stress on secondary metabolism of Eleuthero. Growth and photosynthetic physiological parameters showed that drought stress could inhibit the growth and photosynthesis of Eleuthero. The compounds studied showed the same cumulative trend in various organs of Eleuthero under different drought stress conditions, with the highest content in the moderate drought stress group and the lowest in the severe drought stress group. Among them, the content of eleutheroside B was found to be higher in the 5-year-old stem. The content of eleutheroside E was higher in the 3-year root. The content of isofraxidin was highest in the 5-year-old root. The content of hyperoside, rutin, and kaempferol were higher in the 3-year-old leaves. The results show that a wet soil environment was beneficial to growth and photosynthesis of Eleutherococcus senticosus, and moderate drought stress is conducive to the accumulation of its active ingredients.

Open access

Natalie Bumgarner, Sheri Dorn, Esther McGinnis, Pam Bennett, Ellen Bauske, Sarada Krishnan and Lucy Bradley

Many fields of research converge to assess the impact of plants on human health, well-being, and nutrition. However, even with a recent history of horticulturists contributing to human–plant interaction work, much of the current research is conducted outside the context of horticulture and specifically outside of consumer horticulture (CH). To connect CH to research being conducted by other disciplines that explore the role of plants in improving human quality of life, a workshop was held on 1 Aug. 2018 in Washington, DC, at the American Society for Horticultural Science (ASHS) annual conference. The workshop focused on current food science, nutrition, and crop-breeding efforts to enhance nutrition and flavor, and human health and well-being research related to nature and plant interactions in an increasingly urban population. Following these presentations regarding potential research linkages and collaboration opportunities, a facilitated discussion identified ways to improve future CH research and foster collaborative work. Action items identified included connecting research and vocabulary to help cultivate an interest in plants in younger generations; supporting awareness of collaborative opportunities with health, nutrition, urban planning, and public health practitioners; ensuring CH is known to administrators; and taking responsibility for initiating communication with colleagues in these areas.

Open access

Anthony L. Witcher, Fulya Baysal-Gurel, Eugene K. Blythe and Donna C. Fare

Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) is a valuable nursery product typically produced as a field-grown crop. Container-grown flowering dogwood can grow much faster than field-grown plants, thus shortening the production cycle, yet unacceptable crop loss and reduced quality continue to be major issues with container-grown plants. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of container size and shade duration on growth of flowering dogwood cultivars Cherokee Brave™ and Cherokee Princess from bare-root liners. In 2015, bare-root liners were transplanted to 23-L (no. 7) containers and placed under shade for 0 months (full sun), 2 months (sun4/shade2), 4 months (sun2/shade4), or 6 months (full shade) during the growing season. In 2016, one-half of the plants remained in no. 7 containers and the other half were transplanted to 50-L (no. 15) containers and assigned to the same four shade treatments. In 2015, plant height was greatest with full shade for both cultivars, whereas stem diameter and shoot dry weight (SDW) were greatest in full shade for Cherokee Brave™. In 2016, both cultivars in no. 15 containers had greater plant height, stem diameter, root dry weight (RDW), and SDW. Full shade resulted in the greatest height, stem diameter, RDW, and SDW for Cherokee Brave™, and improved overall growth for ‘Cherokee Princess’. However, vigorous growth due to container size and shade exposure increased the severity of powdery mildew (Erysiphe pulchra) in both years. Substrate leachate nutrient concentration (nitrate nitrogen and phosphate) was greater in no. 15 containers but shade duration had no effect.