Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 42,371 items for

In Honduras, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is an economically important crop for farmers because of its high domestic consumption, year-round production, and high export potential. However, tomato production faces challenges such as diseases and pests and is confounded by climate change, all of which reduce productivity and quality. Evaluating the adaptation of tomato cultivars is critical to ensuring the long-term sustainability and resilience of the horticulture sector in the region. The objective of this study was to identify tomato lines with adaptability, high yield, pest, and disease resistance under greenhouse and open field production conditions for the Honduran market. Ten tomato lines and two commercial hybrids were evaluated between Feb and Jul 2022 in San Antonio de Oriente, Francisco Morazán, Honduras. Desirable traits related to vegetative growth, productivity, fruit quality, and resistance to insect pests and diseases were measured. Seven lines were highly adapted and had high vegetative growth. The tomato lines were not significantly different in terms of tomato yellow leaf curl disease and late blight disease index; however, the fruit borer susceptibility varied, with AVTO1908 being the most susceptible. The highest performing line was AVTO1903, which had the greatest total marketable yield in both the open field (101.3 t⋅ha−1) and greenhouse (62.1 t⋅ha−1). Additionally, AVTO1903 and AVTO1915 had good quality traits (roundness index, total soluble solids, and dry matter), thus demonstrating their potential for sustainable and high-yielding cultivation in Honduras. The growth and productivity of the tomato lines were highly influenced by the environment. This work highlights the advantages of introducing exotic cultivars to combat the effects of climate change and ensure sustained production; however, further research is needed to ensure that local farmer and consumer demands are met.

Open Access

Cover crops between rows in orchards can improve the development of soil resources and increase agricultural productivity. However, there have been few reports of cover crops that can act as a “green manure” in apple orchards across arid and semiarid zones. This study investigated the effects of planting interrow vegetation on soil properties and apple tree performance during a 32-month experiment. There were six treatments: clean cultivation as a control; natural grass planting; planting with ryegrass; planting with alfalfa; planting with tall fescue; and planting with villous wild pea cover crops. The treatments primarily affected the 0- to 20-cm surface soil layer. Soil carbon, nitrogen, and enzyme levels initially decreased (during the first 12–24 months); then, they increased (24–32 months). The cover crops significantly increased nutrient contents (soluble organic carbon, microbial carbon and nitrogen, alkaline dissolved nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, and ammonium nitrogen) in the 0- to 20-cm soil layer by more than 19.6% and increased the related enzyme activities by more than 25.2%. The alfalfa and wild pea alleys had a stronger effect on the soil environment than the control, natural grass, ryegrass, and tall fescue alley treatments; however, after 32 months, the alfalfa treatment inhibited fruit tree growth and development. This was unexpected because alfalfa seemed to have a positive effect on soil fertility characteristics. Under local ecological conditions, villous wild pea had the greatest effect on apple orchard productivity and significantly increased short branching by 15.9%, fruit weight per fruit by 12.6%, yield per plant by 8.6%, and soluble sugar content by 10.5% compared with clean cultivation. The correlation analysis showed that there were significant or highly significant positive correlations between fruit tree performance and soil carbon, nitrogen, and enzyme activity levels as the soil layer depth increased. Therefore, under local ecological conditions, cover crops have a greater effect on orchard surface soil fertility than on deeper soils, and intercropping with villous wild pea potentially produces the greatest improvement in apple orchard productivity.

Open Access

To investigate and compare hardwood species based on their carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage capacity, a study of the C and N content of the bark and wood of nine common hardwood broadleaves in Novi Pazar, southwestern Serbia, was conducted. Compared with sycamore maple, Norway maple, common ash, common hornbeam, black locust, European beech, Turkey oak, and sessile oak, field maple has the highest C/N ratio in wood (37.05 ± 3.23), representing the best hardwood species for biomass production.

Open Access

Online sales of plants are relatively new compared with other products. An online survey was used to measure online and in-store plant/flower spending from 1290 participants. Participants were satisfied with their online plant/flower purchases and spent $31.86 more on plants/flowers through online retailers than in stores. Participants’ social media use increased their in-store plant/flower spending but not online spending. Using Amazon, Google, and farm-direct online retailers increased both in-store and online plant/flower spending. Demographic characteristics did not influence online or in-store spending, except income which had a positive effect.

Open Access

‘Coy’ alder-leaf mountain mahogany (Cercocarpus montanus) is a new cultivar developed from a species native to the western United States with potential for use in xeriscaping, rock gardens, and water-efficient landscaping. However, efficient propagation methods are not well developed for it. In this study, cutting propagation of ‘Coy’ alder-leaf mountain mahogany was investigated over 3 years to evaluate the effects of wounding method, rooting hormone, type of cuttings collected, and time for cutting collection on rooting. In May, Jul, and Sep 2020, 2021, and 2022, nondormant hardwood subterminal cuttings and/or semihardwood terminal cuttings were collected for wounding studies. Before the treatment with 3000 mg·L−1 indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) in powder, cuttings were wounded either by scraping one side (scrape) or by perpendicular cuts around the base (cut), and cuttings without additional wounding were used as the control. Similarly, subterminal and terminal cuttings of ‘Coy’ alder-leaf mountain mahogany were collected during the same time and were used for hormone treatments. Cuttings were treated with 1000 or 3000 mg·L−1 IBA in powder or 1000/500 or 3000/1500 mg·L−1 IBA/NAA (1-naphthaleneacetic acid) in solution. Wounding by cut or scrape increased the rooting percentage. In addition, most cuttings wounded by the scrape method had better rooting than those wounded with cuts. On the basis of hierarchical cluster analyses, cuttings treated with 3000 mg·L−1 IBA in powder had greater rooting than those treated with other hormones. Therefore, our research showed that successful rooting of subterminal or terminal stem cuttings of ‘Coy’ alder-leaf mountain mahogany can be achieved through wounding using scrape method and by treatment with 3000 mg·L−1 IBA in powder.

Open Access

The University of Connecticut Extension Sustainable Landscapes program seeks to develop an invasive plant training program to equip stakeholder groups of varied experiential backgrounds with the information needed to evaluate, manage, and mitigate populations of invasive species in Connecticut. A mixed methods needs assessment was conducted to explore diverse viewpoints about invasive plant education. Data were collected from 233 survey respondents and three focus group interviews. Landscape professional/contractors and municipal employees totaled 41.1% of respondents when combined, and home gardeners totaled 27.9%. The greatest programmatic need identified by survey respondents was invasive plant management options and strategies, with Japanese knotweed considered the most problematic invasive plant from a list of 16 species. Focus group participants expressed enthusiasm about targeted educational programming, such as efforts focused on land management principles, species identification, state regulatory agencies, and pesticide application. Many shared the need for enhanced public education efforts and resource availability. A hybrid approach, including virtual and in-person components, was recommended as the ideal delivery modality for an invasive plant training program.

Open Access

Selenium is an essential mineral for both humans and animals. Around 0.5–1 billion individuals globally suffer from selenium deficiency, which can result in a range of illnesses. Hence, the cultivation of selenium-enriched agricultural items can serve as a potent strategy to mitigate selenium deficiency. This study aimed to examine the effect of selenium on the quality, and phytochemical and mineral content of red currant (Red Lake) and jostaberry. The study was conducted in 2022 and 2023. Different doses of selenium (0, 4, and 8 mg⋅kg−1) were sprayed on the fruits three times with 10-days intervals starting from the first formation of the fruits after flowering. Upon completion of the study, various factors were assessed including cluster and berry properties, water-soluble dry matter content, pH levels, titratable acid content, ascorbic acid levels, antioxidant activity, and total phenolics content. The mineral composition of the fruit peel, pulp, and seed was also measured. In jostaberry, the highest values of cluster weight, cluster height, and 100-berry weight were obtained with 8 mg⋅kg−1 selenium application. As the selenium dosage increased, the levels of ascorbic acid, antioxidant activity, and total phenolic content increased, with the highest values determined to be 0.063 mg⋅mL−1, 63.23% DPPH, and 3752.22 mg⋅g−1, respectively, at 8 mg⋅kg−1. In the Red Lake variety, it has been determined that the 4 mg⋅kg−1 dose is effective in terms of cluster weight, cluster width, and cluster height attributes. The highest values for ascorbic acid, antioxidant activity, and total phenolic content were determined to be 0.029 mg⋅mL−1, 53.42% DPPH, and 3117.17 mg⋅g−1, respectively, at the 4 mg⋅kg−1 dose. The selenium content was found to be highest in the peel and pulp of jostaberry at 8 mg⋅kg−1, and in Red Lake, it was obtained at the 4 mg⋅kg−1 application. As a result, an 8 mg⋅kg−1 dose of selenium could be recommended for jostaberry, and a 4 mg⋅kg−1 dose could be recommended for Red Lake.

Open Access